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DIY Surround Sound Speaker Stands - Copper Pipe

Discussion in 'Home Cinema Building DIY' started by thabenksta, Dec 16, 2004.

  1. thabenksta

    thabenksta
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    It took me awhile to come up with a good idea for Speaker Stands, but I found the perfect econimcal solution, Copper Pipes.

    [​IMG]

    It's a simple design.

    [​IMG]


    Read the full article
     
  2. eviljohn2

    eviljohn2
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    That's a great idea, I was going to suggest the H type base but you already mention that in the full article! I keep thinking that pipes are a very good way to design speaker stands as they're strong but light (the ideal speaker stand has zero mass and is completely solid and stable for those that don't know). :)
     
  3. thabenksta

    thabenksta
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    I'd like to figure out a way to add weight to the base. I was thinking if there was something that I could melt and inject into the base pipes.

    BTW: here's a pic of the H-base.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. Mat-Moo

    Mat-Moo
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    Why not just fill the pipes with sand or something?
     
  5. thabenksta

    thabenksta
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    That was suggested at another forum. Great idea, I think I'll do that.
     
  6. gaz

    gaz
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    or lead
     
  7. MikeRJ

    MikeRJ
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    Molten lead would melt all the solder joints! Lead shot might be ok, though it's expensive which defeats the cheap DIY theme.

    What is the theory behind this? As long as the stand is rigid and well damped to prevent any resonances, what difference does the mass make?
     
  8. eviljohn2

    eviljohn2
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    Reasonably simple to follow although there's 2 ways to approach it. The first is that we really just want the speaker to float in free space completely stationary. Obviously this is a bit impractical but making the stand as close to this model can only be a good thing.

    More importantly, we have to assume that the speaker stand will be oscillated by the speaker mounted on it. A stand with very low mass per unit volume will stop oscillating very quickly whilst a heavier stand will continue to oscillate once it's been started. Naturally, the trade-off here is in rigidity so a compromise needs to be found.

    It follows that the ideal stand is completely solid but with very low mass. The obvious way is to make it out of a material with a very high frequency resonance (impractical) and to load it in such a way that there's very little mass in the support but a large amount at the base to hold it steady. A number of "high-end" stands are designed according to these principles, but also demonstrating that well engineered items needn't be hard to design and construct (particularly for the DIYer when it comes to stands/racks) if the right thought processes are used. The idea that "heavier is better" is something of a misconception here. :)
     
  9. MikeRJ

    MikeRJ
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    Looking at it the other way, a lighter stand will have larger amplitude vibrations imparted to it by the speaker, a heavier one will have lower amplitude.

    The time taken to stop an oscillation is determined ONLY by the damping factor, not the weight. Taking all that into account it would seem a very heavy, but well damped stand would be the prime choice for the optimum acousticaly dead solution.
     
  10. Londondecca

    Londondecca
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    In my experience, lighter speakers seem to prefer heavy (high mass) stands whereas heavy speakers benefit from lighter (open) stands.
     
  11. cornelis

    cornelis
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