DIY mounting JVC N7 projector on ceiling - advice please

techted

Active Member
Was hoping for some DIY advice :)

I had a Sony 270es projector (14kg) that was professionally installed using a low profile mount on a drop down ceiling. The drop down ceiling itself was custom built with the intention of having the drop down screen, Atmos speakers and the projector to be mounted/installed into it.

Fast forward a few years, have gotten a used JVC N7. It is heavier at 20kg (an extra 7kg compared to the previous projector) and the existing screw holes don’t match so will have to insert the screws in a slightly different place.

I need some advice as the manual doesn't provide any instructions or recommendations as to mounting. It is only straight forward instructions of how to attach the mount to the projector.
  • the previous install used 5 screws in a cross formation. Will use the same centre position.
  • the ceiling is made of MDF board
  • there is definitely wood studs in there
(to avoid any comments on my ceiling colour, it and the walls will be repainted dark soon)

Photos of the ceiling where the projector will go
  • orientation: the plug is where the rear of the projector will be
  • existing screw holes are visible
  • pencil marks show the square outline of where the new mount will be
  • pencil marks also show the position of the available screw holes on the new mount
  • the centre screw will remain the same, the other four will have to be repositioned
  • the metal cubes are neodynium magnets that mark were nails exist which indirectly indicate where the wood studs are (tried using a stud finder but the one I have isn't so good with finding wood studs vs metal/electric pipe; also tried the classic knuckle knock technique but results are ambiguous)

Is using the same 5 screws enough to hold the extra weight? Should I use more screws?

Is there something else I might be missing or am I overthinking it?

EDIT (18 Feb 2022): I remembered that the installer made a video of the installation and posted it on his website and I can see the framework under the drop ceiling. See last photo below. There is a beam in the form of a cross where the projector mount screws are screwed into.


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kenshingintoki

Distinguished Member
what have u posted or ceiling? looks BLACK!

Also the N series looks glorious! massive. I have mine on a table too at the moment lol.
 
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techted

Active Member
what have u posted or ceiling? looks BLACK!

Also the N series looks glorious! massive. I have mine on a table too at the moment lol.

There is a starscape in the centre of the ceiling which is black felt but the ceiling periphery is white which will soon be repainted dark.

It is massive! Have to slouch on the seats at the moment otherwise the top of our heads block the projector!
 
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kenshingintoki

Distinguished Member
There is a starscape in the centre of the ceiling which is black felt but the ceiling periphery is white which will soon be repainted dark.

It is massive! Have to slouch on the seats at the moment otherwise the top of our heads block the projector!
lmao me too!!! literally had to slouch yesterday hahaha!
 
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Ill recommend building a box to put the projector in, so you can keep it standing on its feet, that way its less likely that dust will get on the panels inside the projector, which is quite a problem on the ceiling-mounted units.
 
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swiftpete

Distinguished Member
You’ll know if you’re hitting a joist or screwing straight into plasterboard as there’s much more resistance with a joist. I’d use 100mm screws into the joist though rather than those which look to be 40mm. The other 2 short ones into the plasterboard won’t be doing a whole lot. 100mm are what I used for peace of mind as I didn’t want it falling on someone’s head.
 
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pagenotfound

Active Member
As you are decorating, is cutting a bit of an access hole into the plasterboard an option for you?

I did this when I self installed my HD1. Didn't have a joist to screw into so made a decent sized hole to fit some timber noggins that I could then screw into. Once the plasterboard I cut away was fixed back in place and filled, all looked good and knew I had a decent bit of timber to fix to. All covered with the installed projector anyway. Only regret is that I didn't provision for a safety cable. Maybe a job for another day/next projector. (14 years of HD1 and counting though)
 
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alebonau

Distinguished Member
Is using the same 5 screws enough to hold the extra weight? Should I use more screws?
dry wall ? no...

there is only one surety ... screws go into wood behind the plaster...
Am almost sure 3 of the screws will be on a wood stud (the 3 that are in a line front to back), not so confident on the other two. The installer used shorter screws on 2 of the 5 which is making me wonder ...
get your installer back to remount if unsure.. but have to find the wood...use a stud finder if need be... or use a pin punch... to find the beams... ie you [oke through with a pin/needle punch till goes upto wood but wont go further.. tells you where wood is..

this mount is a flush one and will be impossible to use to align your projector to your screen. for an N7 projector what is best recommended is a chief mount or storm mount. or better still the crimson mount you can buy with its own custom jvc plate from mike G/craig peer on AVS.


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you dont have to use the pole extension can just attach direct to the ceiling. will get a custom jvc plate so holes line up. the mount will with precision let you align the projector exactly wiht the screen and then lock up so wont move...

but please if unsure bet a pro to do the installation for you. these are VERY heavy projectors with off centre (front heavy) load. and need careful and secure mounting.. no mounting to just plaster and decent coach bolts into wood to solidly secure.
 
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techted

Active Member
dry wall ? no...

there is only one surety ... screws go into wood behind the plaster...

get your installer back to remount if unsure.. but have to find the wood...use a stud finder if need be... or use a pin punch... to find the beams... ie you [oke through with a pin/needle punch till goes upto wood but wont go further.. tells you where wood is..

Thanks for the tips! Been reading reviews for stud finders and they seem to be hit and miss. Don't suppose you could recommend a really good one that doesn't cost a lot?


this mount is a flush one and will be impossible to use to align your projector to your screen. for an N7 projector what is best recommended is a chief mount or storm mount. or better still the crimson mount you can buy with its own custom jvc plate from mike G/craig peer on AVS.

My previous projector was mounted using a low profile mount as well, the main reason being is that my ceiling height is relatively low at 2.1m. If you add the height of the N7 and the mount, the distance between the floor and the projector will be only about 1.8m. Fortunately I am not a tall person (1.7m) but even then my head will already be quite close to it. If I use a mount that is thicker, may potentially keep hitting the projector with my head. (Need to pass by the projector on a regular basis to get to the my disc collection)

The way the holes are designed on the mount looks like it is made to swivel left and right prior to tightening the screws. Am thinking with a laser measure, I can check that the mount is perfectly parallel to the screen before securing it and placing the projector.

I'll check out those other mounts you mentioned though and see.
 
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swiftpete

Distinguished Member
If you’re going into the old holes you won’t need a stud finder. It looks like 3 of them are in the joist so an impact driver to drive 3 100mm screws in should do the job. The other ones are optional afterwards that are only going into plasterboard, they’ll not really be holding any weight but you might as well put them in.

If you’ve found the joist there’ll be resistance the whole way in. If it’s just plasterboard as soon as you’ve gone through the plasterboard the screw will drive in really easily with no resistance. You’ll definitely know the difference once you try and screw one in. You will need an impact driver though to get long screws into wood, you won’t get them in with a hand screwdriver.

The good thing is as your projector is front heavy it looks like your joist goes front to back so the big screws will be in line with the weight. If you can have someone give you a hand sliding the two mounts together once you’ve got the top bit on the ceiling it would be good. I did it by myself with my epson 9400 and I was sweating cobs in case I dropped it and thousands of pounds exploded into nothingness. Thankfully I didn’t!

Good luck, it really isn’t tough to do now the holes are marked out already.
 
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techted

Active Member
ADDENDUM (18 Feb 2022): I remembered that the installer made a video of the installation and posted it on his website and I can see the framework under the drop ceiling!

There is a joist in the form of a cross where the projector mount screws are screwed into. (The top of the photo is where the projector goes)

If all 5 screws screw into a joist, would it support a 20kg projector? Or should I add more?

I vaguely recall the installer saying the framework could support a man and he did a quick pull up himself while holding onto the framework.

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techted

Active Member
If you’re going into the old holes you won’t need a stud finder. It looks like 3 of them are in the joist so an impact driver to drive 3 100mm screws in should do the job. The other ones are optional afterwards that are only going into plasterboard, they’ll not really be holding any weight but you might as well put them in.

If you’ve found the joist there’ll be resistance the whole way in. If it’s just plasterboard as soon as you’ve gone through the plasterboard the screw will drive in really easily with no resistance. You’ll definitely know the difference once you try and screw one in. You will need an impact driver though to get long screws into wood, you won’t get them in with a hand screwdriver.

The good thing is as your projector is front heavy it looks like your joist goes front to back so the big screws will be in line with the weight. If you can have someone give you a hand sliding the two mounts together once you’ve got the top bit on the ceiling it would be good. I did it by myself with my epson 9400 and I was sweating cobs in case I dropped it and thousands of pounds exploded into nothingness. Thankfully I didn’t!

Good luck, it really isn’t tough to do now the holes are marked out already.

Thanks for your comment. I have additional info that I posted just before this post. Do you reckon 5 screws that all screw into a joist is enough to support 20kg?

Also found out that the drop ceiling is MDF board.
 
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5 large wood screws in to a wooden beam will very comfortably support 20kg! You could probably hold 20kg with a single screw so 5 would be more than enough!!

Way OTT but if you want to go belt and braces - use 5 of these in to the joists - pre drill a pilot hole first with a 4mm drill and use an impact driver if you have one…

 
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alebonau

Distinguished Member
Thanks for the tips! Been reading reviews for stud finders and they seem to be hit and miss. Don't suppose you could recommend a really good one that doesn't cost a lot?
installers dont rely just on stud finders. they use stud finder usually only to roughly place. then use pin punch - needle punch to find and make sure where wood is ..which way runs etc. there are plenty of good brands.. bosch ?

re the old holes you want to make sure actually going into the wood and the screws used look too puny... for larger coach screws/bolts you usually pre drill a pilot hole (this is mentioned on the packed to wood screws) then screw in and it bites with enough ability to retain

My previous projector was mounted using a low profile mount as well, the main reason being is that my ceiling height is relatively low at 2.1m. If you add the height of the N7 and the mount, the distance between the floor and the projector will be only about 1.8m. Fortunately I am not a tall person (1.7m) but even then my head will already be quite close to it. If I use a mount that is thicker, may potentially keep hitting the projector with my head. (Need to pass by the projector on a regular basis to get to the my disc collection)
these mounts will add what 50-75mm at most ? as they can mount direct/flush to the ceiling. the drop due to that is not a lot ? the benefit is alignment with precision...and will stay there. can lock it up and if there are structural changes... ie any movement in the house...shrinking movement etc you can align back up in seconds. when you use these precision mounts you will realise just how easy it is with those to line up and be wondering why ever used anything else !
 
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techted

Active Member
It is up! Thanks all for the advice.

Next - painting the ceiling dark

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techted

Active Member
Looks great. What's the brand of the Flush mount that you used? I'm not familiar with that one.
I found two low profile mounts for JVC projectors online - Techniq and JVC. There are a few online retailers that sell them. I ended up going with the latter.

 
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