DIY: Door rubbing against lock-side jamb with new latch

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by sergiup, Feb 16, 2018.

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  1. sergiup

    sergiup
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    I'm trying to use the right terminology - watch me fail...

    I have a wooden door & frame which required a replacement of its (standard, Yale) night latch. This also meant replacing the keep. Now, the previous keep was held in place with two pretty small screws. With the new keep, I did the alleged right thing and tried to use the four much sturdier screws - only to find the door jamb starting to curve inwards. As far as I can see, the lock-side jamb / frame is too shallow and I might be hitting the wall, and I would either have to use shorter screws, or pre-drill through it, into the wall, and fit the keep with possibly even longer screws with wall plugs pushed all the way through, into the wall.

    I now also have to sand down the parts of the jamb/frame that are now rubbing against the door, unless the trick of fitting the keep with long screws and wall plugs compresses it back into place (we're only talking about 1-1.5mm deflection).

    Does this sound right? Would anyone (with far more experience) suggest anything else?

    Thank you! :thumbsup:
     
  2. IronGiant

    IronGiant
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    Remove the screws and see if the door jamb springs back into place. If it does, cut a few mm off the end of the screws with a hacksaw and re-insert them. You should have used screws that were shorter than the depth of the jamb, but I wouldn't replace the screws now you have cut a thread with these ones, just cut off the extra length.
     
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  3. rampant

    rampant
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  4. sergiup

    sergiup
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    Thanks; I've tried removing them and annoyingly it doesn't spring back into place, even with gentle persuasion from a rubber mallet - hence the idea to just sand it down a bit in the couple of places where it's rubbing...
     
  5. ThuGLy

    ThuGLy
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    Dyi! Dare you interfere!
     
  6. John

    John
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    Sorry, I can't get beyond the first sentence :rotfl::rotfl::rotfl:
     
  7. sergiup

    sergiup
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    Haha! Can't believe it took me two days to realise I'd mis-spelled that...
     
  8. sergiup

    sergiup
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    Sorted by employing the Mouse sander for a couple of vigorous minutes, no more rubbing. Door frame/jamb reinforcement will have to be a different project.
     

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