DIY Advice - Reaching 6ft to apply sealant or how to get close?

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by Tempest, Aug 26, 2018.

Tags:
  1. Tempest

    Tempest
    Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2002
    Messages:
    8,050
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    Horley, Surrey
    Ratings:
    +3,383
    First some history.

    I have a Conservatory fitted to my bungalow, and ever since it was 1st installed it was known the drop, so the rain would run off into the gutter, was on the shallow side. Not much of an angle.
    But that's what it had to be and what we wanted.

    The actual roof was some new at the time, about 3" thick, triple wall construction I cannot find online now, with aluminium bars, and to seal against the weather, lead strip was used, tucked up under the roof tiles, and then, shaped around the shape of the room panels and spars.

    There has been a little water ingress due I'm sure to this lead lifting, and roof moss causing water to back-track due to the very shallow slope.
    So, I wish to find a way to seal this.

    My problem is, I can't reach it from a ladder on the ground as I can only physically reach half way across the roof depth of 6ft.
    I do not wish to lay on the roof and put my weight on it, due to it's age.
    Ideally I'd kneel on the house roof, but gravity and the angle means I'm going to fighting falling down and onto the conservatory roof all the time.

    I'm thinking Clear Silicon Sealant, and/or very flexible weatherproof repair tape.
    But I need to get there.

    I did think about making some weird DIY super long silicon gun on the end of a bit of wood, but there would be no precision and trying to see what I was going from 6ft away.

    How can I get to the blue bit in the image below.?

    I did wonder about a plank of wood, on the roof tiles, and supported on a ladder other end, but that's going to want to slip down the roof and does not sound very safe.

    Of course a cherry picker would be ideal but way overkill and expensive to hire.

    Any ideas how I can get to that blue area with my hands to get close?

    [​IMG]
     
  2. IronGiant

    IronGiant
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2003
    Messages:
    65,172
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    .
    Ratings:
    +44,843
    A big board placed on the conservatory roof?
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
    • List
  3. Tempest

    Tempest
    Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2002
    Messages:
    8,050
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    Horley, Surrey
    Ratings:
    +3,383
    I could use something like that to spread my weight.
    Actually you just gave me a thought that I'd not considered, which is quite simple.

    I can use some wood and prop on the inside to act as a weight support.
    It's just this roof plastic has become a bit brittle due to sun over the years so I'm trying to avoid damage. Or at worst falling thru it.

    But if I supported the inside, then used foam, and wood on the outside to lay on, in theory that should be ok I'd guess....
     
  4. John7

    John7
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2004
    Messages:
    2,741
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    136
    Ratings:
    +923
    Wouldn't it be easier to seal the join from inside the conservatory, where the roof meets the wall or am I missing the point?
     
  5. IronGiant

    IronGiant
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2003
    Messages:
    65,172
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    .
    Ratings:
    +44,843
    As the roof is 3" thick, you'd potentially get it pooling up on top of the sealant. Depending on the direction the channelling runs it could then potentially run down inside the polycarbonate if the ends are exposed/aren't sealed very well.
     
  6. Tempest

    Tempest
    Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2002
    Messages:
    8,050
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    Horley, Surrey
    Ratings:
    +3,383
    It's hard to explain exactly and too much to draw, so I'll take a few photo's when it stops bloody raining! Tomorrow to hopefully make it clearer and perhaps you can offer some other ideas about best way to help weatherproof it.

    In all honestly it needs a new roof, which is turn would be new facia boards as thats what it's fixed to I'm sure.

    Sure you won't be able to get the same roof, so it would need a rip it all off, and fresh roof, which it will need, but I'd guess still got a few years in it still yet, and I'm guessing I'd be looking at quite a few £1000 for someone to do this.

    The conservatory walls?, windows and door are all fine, still. I fitted new handles on the windows a few months ago, and you'd never guess it's age. It's just the roof that's taken the hit.

    I think I recall them saying it was some fancy new European roof design at the time, as the sections of roof are about 12" wide each one, 3" thick, triple wall, and an aluminium spar every 12" also, it all slid together and overlapped. Way better quality than they typical thin rood stuff.

    I had an off-cut I stupidly threw away years ago!

    Just taken a couple of pics from inside. Not that it really shows much.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  7. swiftpete

    swiftpete
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2006
    Messages:
    5,073
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    136
    Location:
    Notts
    Ratings:
    +1,240
    The metal support bars should hold your weight if you spread it across them. Just lay a ladder over the top of the roof and climb onto it.
     
  8. Tempest

    Tempest
    Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2002
    Messages:
    8,050
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    Horley, Surrey
    Ratings:
    +3,383
    Yes, they did in the past, but due to the damp, over the years affecting the wood the back of the roof is fixed to, it's strength is much diminished, and whilst the roof is still ok, I worry the whole rear would not take my weight without support underneath to take the loading.
     
  9. IronGiant

    IronGiant
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2003
    Messages:
    65,172
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    .
    Ratings:
    +44,843
    If it's that questionable, maybe you should bite the bullet and get it replaced?
     
  10. Tempest

    Tempest
    Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2002
    Messages:
    8,050
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    Horley, Surrey
    Ratings:
    +3,383
    Well it's not going to fall down in the next 5 mins ;)

    It's needed dealing with for years really, but just putting it off due to major expense.
    with me fixing what needs to be fixed, sealing it, I'm sure it must have another 5 years in it still.

    Will put photo's up in this thread tomorrow, it will be obvious what needs sorting out.
    It does not need to be neat. Just work.

    That thick black tar stuff would be great, but yuk, black.
    If you can get it clear, or perhaps even white, then with a trowel I could cover the suspect join all over and I'm sure fix it :)

    Perhaps you can get it in clear/white.

    You know the stuff I mean, like a really super thick sticky paste that's too thick to paint, you have to smear it on, and it sort of semi dries but stays flexible. (as long as it does not eat into plastic!)
     
  11. Tempest

    Tempest
    Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2002
    Messages:
    8,050
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    Horley, Surrey
    Ratings:
    +3,383
  12. IronGiant

    IronGiant
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2003
    Messages:
    65,172
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    .
    Ratings:
    +44,843
  13. nvingo

    nvingo
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2007
    Messages:
    3,068
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    133
    Location:
    Cambridgeshire
    Ratings:
    +658
    Crazy idea, but I don't know if you could slide out or remove the roof panels? It would probably need the top strip unclipping, then the panels would lift out?
    Then a ladder placed up to the inside wall would give you the access you seek.
     
  14. Tempest

    Tempest
    Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2002
    Messages:
    8,050
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    Horley, Surrey
    Ratings:
    +3,383
    Due to the way it's put together I feel it's one of those things that once you start it's all in.
    You'd need to remove the whole length Gutter, then the whole length cover strip?
    Then have access to the bare ends, which then you'd need to break silicon sealing both ends to even start, and then you'd ruin the rest of it.
    It's the kind of thing once you started, your really be committed to replacing the whole things really.
    Good thinking though :)


    Thanks.
    The colour is better :)
    Given they have a picture of a brush I'm guessing this is more thick paint like that, a actual paste that needs to be troweled on.

    At the moment I can only think of, silicon squeezed up where the gap has appeared between the led flashing and the plastic roof to simply fill any gaps.
    Some form of weatherproof very flexible and sticky tape to go over this join, or some thick paste to do the same. Or a combination of two of these.
    It does not need to look pretty really. Just be a good seal and stay stuck into place and not lift.
     
  15. Tempest

    Tempest
    Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2002
    Messages:
    8,050
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    Horley, Surrey
    Ratings:
    +3,383
    Ok, as promised an update with Photo's

    I'm sure it will be apparent, seeing the photo's the issue I wish to deal with.

    And also yes, looks a bit grotty now. It was always just a nice semi transparent misty white roof, and still the same from inside, but as you can see the outside it taking some pretty yukky brown discoloration now that's actually gone into the plastic.
    Thankfully it's not too bad looking from inside.

    Still got a few years in it yet (shame about the looks) but wish to deal with the water/join issue.

    As I mentioned yesterday, the very shallow drop/angle has never helped really.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  16. IronGiant

    IronGiant
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2003
    Messages:
    65,172
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    .
    Ratings:
    +44,843
    My plan would be to lift the lead half an inch or so, clean under it, seal under it, then push the lead back into place. Which means getting good access to it via crawler boards :smashin:
     
  17. Tempest

    Tempest
    Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2002
    Messages:
    8,050
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    Horley, Surrey
    Ratings:
    +3,383
    Indeed yes, the lead was never flexible enough to fully match the contours of the roof-top plastic, and, as you can see, due to the very shallow angle, and moss or even wind, can mean the water can too easily back track up under the lead, which is what's been happening for years.

    As you say, needs to be REALLY dried out, perhaps a vacuum with fine nozzle to suck out debris, then wack in something like that thick paste like roof repair gunge you need to trowel on, to totally block these gaps, perhaps even then for double protection a layer of the bitumen stick on strip on top of that ?

    But as I said..... I need to reach it really.

    Which means me on the concertvaory roof, or me on the house roof, but that's working downhill and liable to fall/roll onto the conservatory roof.

    Or a 6ft mastic gun ;)
     
  18. Tempest

    Tempest
    Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2002
    Messages:
    8,050
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    Horley, Surrey
    Ratings:
    +3,383
    Ohh look what i found ;)

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  19. IronGiant

    IronGiant
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2003
    Messages:
    65,172
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    .
    Ratings:
    +44,843
    Awesome :)
     
  20. jassco

    jassco
    Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2009
    Messages:
    6,008
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Ratings:
    +2,903
    Alternatively you could get some roofing ladders and attack it from the top
     
  21. Tempest

    Tempest
    Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2002
    Messages:
    8,050
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    Horley, Surrey
    Ratings:
    +3,383
    Thanks, yeah, I did see on Google the ladders you get that hook over the top of the roof.
    I could hire a couple of those I guess.
    I will admit, having been up on the roof a few times before, whilst from the ground it does not look high or very steep, when up there is feels a LOT higher and steeper!
    And Gravity feels strong in wanting to make you come down!

    Perhaps I can get some 6 year old child to do it for me ;)
     
  22. Tempest

    Tempest
    Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2002
    Messages:
    8,050
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    Horley, Surrey
    Ratings:
    +3,383
    Now this may sound very laurel and hardy like, but I did think, if I got a tow rope, tie it to a large metal weight (I have some) throw the rope over the roof, and tie around my waste, then I'd be unable to fall, as the weight would be over the roof and down the other side. :)

    [​IMG]
     
  23. tommitch

    tommitch
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2016
    Messages:
    613
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    96
    Location:
    London
    Ratings:
    +655
    Looking at the photos, I'd being doing it how you've already said, get a few acrows and support the roof from below then lay some boards on top of the roof, access to the flashing will be a lot easier from the front, rather than on top from the house roof.
     
  24. Doug the D

    Doug the D
    Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2010
    Messages:
    8,629
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    Dorset
    Ratings:
    +13,800
    I can't tell from your post if you're joking or not. If not, please, please don't attempt this.

    As someone who's worked at height for years, I can tell you that most accidents involving height happen in the home by DIYers not suitably trained, using the wrong kit for the job. You will just hurt yourself or someone else.

    You don't seem overly confident working in the most safe manner suggested so far (crawling boards), so you certainly are not going to be safe hanging from a rope.

    I know you don't have £000's to hand for a new roof, I appreciate that - but could you not get a quote from someone that knows what they're doing to just seal your existing roof? You will then be in a position to get the job done right and more importantly, safely.

    Crawling boards will work fine for some people but not others - I don't know how fit you are, or how heavy you are.
     
  25. Robbowal

    Robbowal
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    May 6, 2013
    Messages:
    529
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    96
    Location:
    London
    Ratings:
    +664
  26. Chocci

    Chocci
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2017
    Messages:
    51
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    11
    Location:
    Shoreham-by-Sea
    Ratings:
    +24
    Put a board on each corner at 45 degrees then a long board between the two
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • List
  27. Tempest

    Tempest
    Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2002
    Messages:
    8,050
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    Horley, Surrey
    Ratings:
    +3,383
    I was kinda joking really, though in theory a rope and counter weight over the roof should work :)

    Boards on roof with support underneath to take weight (just in case) sounds most practical.

    Weight wise I'd imagine most builders would be a fair bit heavier than me at around 11 stone 7 lbs.

    I just object to paying someone lets say £300 to apply £30 max worth of sealant.

    I don't mind paying professionals (that is a very lose term I know) for somethings so basic.
    If it's something complex, or structural etc, then fine, but I just find it hard when it's a simple task to be done. (given I have to probably work a week to pay them for half a days work!)
     
  28. nvingo

    nvingo
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2007
    Messages:
    3,068
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    133
    Location:
    Cambridgeshire
    Ratings:
    +658
    By the same token, if you had to pay professional scaffolding erectors to give 'proper safe access' for yourself to carry out the actual work (and dismantle after) would also cost more than employing someone to carry out the work.
     
  29. Tempest

    Tempest
    Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2002
    Messages:
    8,050
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    Horley, Surrey
    Ratings:
    +3,383
    I think it depends on how silly the health and safety is at the time :)

    Like how Virgin will nail a wire around the whole outside of your house, as opposed to just running it up the wall, into the loft and dropping down in the room.
    As they are not allowed to go into lofts anymore.

    You still do have people who use common sense, I'm guessing solo builders/craftsmen.
    As people who took the chimney down from the bungalow was just a couple of ladders, and rope and did a excellent job for a reasonable price.
    I'm guessing perhaps others who work for a larger company would insist of full scaffolding, and planks and such like to ensure the safety of the workers in the event of something.

    I don't wish anyone to ever take big risks, and would hate anyone to get hurt, but sometimes, health and safety can seem to just get a bit OTT.
     
  30. Doug the D

    Doug the D
    Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2010
    Messages:
    8,629
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    Dorset
    Ratings:
    +13,800
    I know everyone thinks that H&S is the devil's work, but it's really not :). I'm not a H&S militant, but I work for a company that takes it seriously and I've quite enjoyed going home at the end of my working day in one piece for the past 10 years.

    Scenarios like yours are not as much about H&S as people think too - can you imagine how expensive it is for a company like Virgin to replace your bedroom ceiling when their engineer puts his foot through it? Times that by however many lofts they could potentially work in and that figure is huge. Far cheaper to pay for the additional 10 metres of coax cable on each job :smashin:
     

Share This Page

Loading...
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice