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Display query

Discussion in 'Desktop & Laptop Computers Forum' started by shodan, Feb 15, 2005.

  1. shodan

    shodan
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    Just a settings question for yous..
    My pc, 2.4Ghz, P4, grphics card Nvidia FX5200 -with 256ram, monitor is HP Pavillion MX70 - 17" CRT monitor

    What sort od display settings should I be running?

    At the mo it is set to 1280x1024 True Colour (32 bit) 60hz.
    I understand what all those things mean but I don't quite follow how they all work together so I'm wondering if you can advise me on better settings for the display as there seems to be hundreds I could choose from and when I start going through them all I just get confused... :rolleyes:

    The machine isn't used as HTPC (yet) as I watch dvd's on a normal TV and the S-vid out from the pc is crap. Even if I did the whole doogle thingy to make it a RGB scart from the pc to the tv I doubt it woubt be better than my normal dvd player and I'd have to turn the computer on everytime I wanted to watch a film and the keyboard and muose keys arn't long enough to stretch from the TV area to the sofa etc. etc. (Please feel free to correct me on any of this!!).

    Also, if I did decide to start using it as HTPC, what sort of changes should I make? The computer bit itself is a HP Pavillion 462.uk 4.gb HD and 256RAM memory..

    OK, enough rambling from me, I've even bored myself he so lord knows how you are feeling!!! :D
     
  2. KraGorn

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    For a digital display the ideal is to have a desktop resolution the same as the display, aka. 1:1 mapping. CRTs don't have a fixed pixel arrary so the resolution for those becomes less critical and here you're best off using trial and error to find the best settings.

    Next, if your display allows multiple refresh rates .. many digital panel systems are stuck at 60hz .. you want to set 50hz to view PAL video/film, 60hz for NTSC video and 48hz for NTSC film.

    You processor is fine for normal DVD playback and a bit of post-processing (though scaling may tax it), the FX5200 is okay for a normal TV, though you'd want to switch to a Radeon 9600 or perhaps an nVidia 6200 (assuming an AGP version exists) if you were to move to a large screen/projector.

    Hard disk space isn't a requirement unless you want to play ripped DVDs, or get into recording TV programmes, at which point you'll be looking at 160Gb or more.

    Does this help? :)
     
  3. shodan

    shodan
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    Thanks KraGorn!

    I think I may not have put the info in the right way on my first post... I mean to say that I am using the pc with the monitor it came with (MX70) and wondered about the best display settings for it!

    The rest of the drivle I wrote was asking about HTPC and saying that I tried it once and it was pants, but are my componants up to scratch for using the PC with my tv for dvd's and internet surfing? Would it be a great improvement if I had a converter (cable or dongle thingy) to go RGB SCART?

    When you mentioned "digital display" are you talking about the likes of pj's and plasma and LCD? My CRT monitor isn't digital is it?

    Many thanks!

    Oh, and just out of curiosity, whats the difference between NTSC film and NTSC video?
     
  4. KraGorn

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    Indeed, "digital display" does refer to those kinds of display, basically anything that isn't a CRT which has a fixed array of pixels. For a CRT use the resolution that gives the best image as there's no 'native' resolution to target, use the appropriate refresh rate.

    Certainly that PC is more than capable of being used for playing DVDs and with a TV tuner for watching programs. You'll find it starts running out of steam if you try to use video post-processing to increase PQ but you'd not be going down that road with a CRT is all probability.

    The difference between film and video is that video is normally 'shot' at 30fps whereas film is 24fps. For reasons I don't really understand you often get smoother playback at 48hz (or 72) even though NTSC is supposed to be a 60hz system. PAL seems to be 25fps no matter what its' source, not sure why.

    Basically I observe these differences and do what I'm told, I don't claim to understand why. :D
     
  5. shodan

    shodan
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    OK, thanks very much then mate! Nice one! Balls to it, I'm not going to bother untill I get a PJ.. (And by then the internet will all be handled by holograms instead of monitors anyway...).

    Just one other query, while I have your attention.... ;-)

    How come I can get a bunch of films on the 10gb hard drive of my Pace Twin and the a/v quality is absolutely spot on yet if I put a dvd on the hard drive (or file share a film onto the hd ;-) ) the quality is less then inspiring...?
     

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