Discussing the impact of Brexit

LexDiamond

Active Member
Depends on where you live, he made big bold promises to the fishing communities and it's time to deliver
I would be inclined to think though that fishing remains irrelevant until level playing field is agreed to, which looks unlikely. I can’t see there being no level playing field but a fishing deal as that would mean no deal in general but only a deal on fishing and that would only favour the other party.
 

richp007

Distinguished Member
It sounds all too much like they are cutting off their nose to spite their face. Fishing doesn't contribute a lot to our economy, and if we had a trade deal with other countries there is give and take. So surely a good deal with the EU is preferable where we continue to have free trade of services, whilst EU countries can benefit from our fishing waters. That would be logical as we benefit more from services we sell to EU companies, than we do from the fishing industry, and they benefit more from our fishing waters than we do.

But no, Boris has said he will protect fishermen, even if that means no trade deal and a bigger hit to the economy.

The state aid debate will also be an interesting one to watch, less regulations and a free-for-all market won't be good for post brexit UK, in my opinion.
We don't want weak state aid rules.

Here is Foster's weekly Brexit piece. A good summation of where we are.


(If behind a paywall use the link in this tweet)


"Either Mr Cummings will have to give up the full sovereignty “do whatever you want” version of life after Brexit; or the EU will indeed have to accept that such a bargain-basement FTA cannot merit such an unprecedented level of co-operation on state aid, as the UK argues.

To get a deal, pragmatism will need to triumph over dogmatically held positions — on both sides. And yet the truth is that Brexit has never been a practical enterprise. If the chasm cannot be bridged, we’ll say that we should have seen it coming all along."
 

mcbainne

Distinguished Member
I would be inclined to think though that fishing remains irrelevant until level playing field is agreed to, which looks unlikely. I can’t see there being no level playing field but a fishing deal as that would mean no deal in general but only a deal on fishing and that would only favour the other party.
Once again it's only irrelevant if it doesn't immediately affect you or your community, i agree it's is almost totally irrelevant for the majority in the country but my area is different. The fishermen i know, including within my family all have high expectations because that's 100% totally what Brexit is all about for them. Level playing fields mean nothing, they were promised a set of realities if Brexit happened, it has now they expect BoJo to deliver
 

LexDiamond

Active Member
Once again it's only irrelevant if it doesn't immediately affect you or your community, i agree it's is almost totally irrelevant for the majority in the country but my area is different. The fishermen i know, including within my family all have high expectations because that's 100% totally what Brexit is all about for them. Level playing fields mean nothing, they were promised a set of realities if Brexit happened, it has now they expect BoJo to deliver
So you envision a deal where there is no level playing field (basically a no deal) but the U.K. hands over fishing rights anyway?

Fair enough, but I’m inclined to think fishing is a red herring.
 

richp007

Distinguished Member
John Hume has passed today.

Respected on all sides, he was a political giant in helping achieve peace and bringing about the end of the troubles. Important that work is not forgotten.


Was also an advocate of the EU.


Well worth a read as well (not too long) -


With perhaps this part a perfect summation for me -

"He could be deeply critical of European institutions for not living up to the aspirations embedded in the EU Treaties, but he invariably saw Europe as a productive framework for resolving a range of contemporary problems. His view was "the democratic nation state was no longer a sufficient political entity to allow people to have adequate control" over economic and technological developments. He wanted to "optimise the real sovereignty of the peoples of Europe rather than ossifying our democratic development around limited notions of national sovereignty." As far as he was concerned, sovereignty and independence had changed their meaning in the post-Cold War of the 1990s. Shared sovereignty and interdependence at European level would, he believed, rid Ireland of its age-old obsession with Britain."

A great pity we don't have more like him now.
 
Last edited:

richp007

Distinguished Member
I don't hold that against him, RIP John.
Nor should anyone of course.

He showed though it was still possible to be critical when required, whilst at the same time supporting the principle. Which I think is true of many who voted to Remain as well. We know it isn't perfect.

Just a pity that neither side has many voices (if any) like his anymore.
 

klaxhu

Well-known Member
Who here was talking up the UK US future trade? You have the mic...

What leverage or tactics? We cannot even seem to be able to keep up with the pace that these negotiations need, let alone “win” in the process.

“One email, dated last month, warned that British plans to make Silicon Valley giants pay more tax risked a roadblock in trade negotiations. The Government aims to impose a digital services tax that will target Google and Facebook, among others, but faces pressure from the US trade department to wait for the OECD to agree international rules.”

 
Last edited:

richp007

Distinguished Member
Apparently the WA has to go.

You know, that thing they all voted for.

Well played.


To avoid their own budget black hole, the EU gets £39billion as a “divorce payment” from us, reflecting our share of the current EU budget. But it gets worse. Buried in the fine print, unnoticed by many, is the fact we remain hooked into the EU’s loan book.

"But didn't anyone read the fine print? Whose job was that....?

You can't be half in the EU & half out, the problem is the WA. It costs too much & it denies us true national independence. This WA giving the EU future control over us has to go. Now Britain faces a £160billion #EU loans bill AFTER #Brexit

"Maybe it shouldn't have been a 'go' in the first place then...."
 
Last edited:

mitch

Distinguished Member
Apparently the WA has to go.

You know, that thing they all voted for.

Well played.


To avoid their own budget black hole, the EU gets £39billion as a “divorce payment” from us, reflecting our share of the current EU budget. But it gets worse. Buried in the fine print, unnoticed by many, is the fact we remain hooked into the EU’s loan book.

"But didn't anyone read the fine print? Whose job was that....?

You can't be half in the EU & half out, the problem is the WA. It costs too much & it denies us true national independence. This WA giving the EU future control over us has to go. Now Britain faces a £160billion #EU loans bill AFTER #Brexit

"Maybe it shouldn't have been a 'go' in the first place then...."
Hilarious reading the replies from Brexiteers claiming Boris should walk away as this is is Theresa Mays deal:rotfl: Meanwhile
 
Last edited:

Panavision

Well-known Member
Apparently the WA has to go.

You know, that thing they all voted for.

Well played.


To avoid their own budget black hole, the EU gets £39billion as a “divorce payment” from us, reflecting our share of the current EU budget. But it gets worse. Buried in the fine print, unnoticed by many, is the fact we remain hooked into the EU’s loan book.

"But didn't anyone read the fine print? Whose job was that....?

You can't be half in the EU & half out, the problem is the WA. It costs too much & it denies us true national independence. This WA giving the EU future control over us has to go. Now Britain faces a £160billion #EU loans bill AFTER #Brexit

"Maybe it shouldn't have been a 'go' in the first place then...."

Now playing the victim card. It's the EU's fault.

Blaming Theresa May for the WA is something I'm reading more often on the internet. My friend is certainly blaming her.

Mate, just leave without a deal. :D
 

mitch

Distinguished Member
You never give it a rest do you! Just have patience, only a few months to wait now.
Give what a rest? This is Johnson’s deal the one the press were lauding him for getting when it was apparently impossible but now it turns out it’s actually a bit sh*t and IDS who actually voted for it is now saying we need to renege on it. It’s pathetic of brexiteers to try and pin this on May as this is what they voted on Johnsons oven ready deal.
 

psikey

Distinguished Member
Give what a rest? This is Johnson’s deal the one the press were lauding him for getting when it was apparently impossible but now it turns out it’s actually a bit sh*t and IDS who actually voted for it is now saying we need to renege on it. It’s pathetic of brexiteers to try and pin this on May as this is what they voted on Johnsons oven ready deal.
Constant negatives and "told you so" snippets about the decision to leave. Nothings decided until its all decided according to EU so really all just pointless speculation until the people "In The Room" make their choices.

I come to see any new info I might have missed and just old reruns. I'm sure you will have to have the last word :rolleyes:
 

richp007

Distinguished Member
Now playing the victim card. It's the EU's fault.

Blaming Theresa May for the WA is something I'm reading more often on the internet. My friend is certainly blaming her.

Mate, just leave without a deal. :D
It's risible to be honest, but we knew it was going to happen.

Anyway, leaving without a deal is potentially going to come with another big price. Similar-ish to the standards issue this one, but this time about the chemical industry.

Obviously no-one expected the average Joe voter to have any idea about this sort of thing, but the reality of what leaving will actually entail is now beginning to be laid bare.

The intricacy of unravelling our relationship was always ultimately going to prove complex, with the likes of this being just one such element.

(clicking on the article link from the tweet should bypass the paywall)


 

psikey

Distinguished Member
Interesting assessment from FT

How Brexit may strengthen the west

Extract:

In the long run, the relationship between the EU and the UK could settle down into something analogous to the relationship between the US and Canada. The Canadians/British have no desire to join the US/EU. They accept that an asymmetry in power with a much larger neighbour is the consequence of maintaining their political independence. But both sides in these lopsided partnerships can still benefit from deep economic integration and strategic co-operation based on shared interests, values and geography.
But it now looks as if the Russian president got it wrong. Far from weakening the west, Brexit may end up strengthening it. Without Britain as a member, the EU is once again progressing towards “ever closer union”. And a stronger EU will be a more effective partner for a post-Donald Trump America.​
For its part, a stronger and more confident EU need no longer fear that Brexit is the first step towards the destruction of the European project. It could therefore afford to be less defensive and more creative in building a new relationship with the UK. In the long run, Britain should aspire to establish a new “special relationship” with Brussels to complement its existing “special relationship” with Washington. These two key partnerships would place the UK back at the centre of a revived western alliance.


Sounds like we need a Canada type deal as Boris wants. I'm happy to be like a Canada off USofE rather than just become a state of the USofE.
 
Last edited:

Similar threads

The latest video from AVForums

Podcast: Home AV, TV, Tech News & Reviews, Plus The Best of July 2020

Trending threads

Top Bottom