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Discussing the impact of Brexit

LM1405

Well-known Member
Did you chose that because you think implying somebody is gay is insulting? That gay is negative? I'm sure you didn't, I'm sure you're just lousy with wordplay and don't hold any unconscious homophobia, you don't come across like a person who thinks like that.
You simply have no idea. With the drivel you post.

I'm not offended at all, just cringing and a little embarrassed for you.
Dont be embarrassed or me, I'm not.
 

sploo

Active Member
Did you chose that because you think implying somebody is gay is insulting? That gay is negative? I'm sure you didn't, I'm sure you're just lousy with wordplay and don't hold any unconscious homophobia, you don't come across like a person who thinks like that.
I did take "mince" as a reference to "steak", and "sweet" for cake, so must admit I hadn't thought it was a homophobic jibe.
 

LM1405

Well-known Member
Not offended, just amused that, as S&C pointed out; the irony of using a racial stereotype to label somebody else a bigot. Genius. Long slow hand clap for you sir. Well done.
Amused? Like the post about the 6 million dead and the other 11 million in care homes.
 

kav

Distinguished Member
Anyway, back on topic and here's a new impact of Brexit

Schiphol Airport in the Netherlands isn't waiting until the end of the transition period and directs all British travellers to the Non EU immigration queue on arrival.

So this is what air travel will look like in 12 months.

Brexiteer complains he has to wait in queue at EU airport

We then have this delicious bit of Schadenfreude.

I was in Schipol a couple of times last week and saw this in action. It's swings and roundabouts. One time there was next to nobody in the queue and the British actually made it through quicker than the EU queue. The other time there was a long line. Seems like teething problems until they work out the most efficient way of doing it.

Edit: apologies, I replied to this at the start of catching up on my backlog and see it's subsequently been explained...
 
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Aj33

Well-known Member
I see this thread has somehow become even worse.

For those throwing bigot around, I suggest you look up the definition because it’s being used incorrectly a fair bit in here.

anyway, to address an earlier point:
Why not wait to judge me until you see how I respond to all the positive impacts of Brexit which I'm sure will be posted any time now.
Whilst that position is fair. I somehow doubt you will see what someone who voted for Brexit sees as a positive, as a positive. For you I suspect it will be a negative.
 

IronGiant

Moderator
S&C is being somewhat disingenuous as he is being judged on his past performance not what he might post in the future and I'm sure he knows it. "I can't recall anything I posted previously" is not a valid defence.

BTW a big :thumbsup: to sploo for his attempts to calm the waters today, it has been noticed :smashin:
 

Pacifico

Distinguished Member
Let me paste in the exact paragraph:

And an awful lot of lies. A lot of lies. And great disrespect to people far greater than him. His little whinge in the EU parliament some years ago being a great example: The story behind #facepalm man at Farage's 'never done a day's work' speech

Now let me do it again with some highlighting:

And an awful lot of lies. A lot of lies. And great disrespect to people far greater than him. His little whinge in the EU parliament some years ago being a great example: The story behind #facepalm man at Farage's 'never done a day's work' speech

Clear?
LOL, you are a card.. :D

You should try actually reading your own links in future. The exact words used were "Most of you have never done a days work in your life" - so as that did not apply to the guy in the picture it was not a reference to him and it wasn't showing him any respect - good or otherwise..

Just admit you made an error and move on with your life - there are bigger things to worry about.
 

Pacifico

Distinguished Member
I won't excuse the corruption, but I will dispute the claim she was unelected

She was elected President by the European Parliament on 16 July, with 383 to 327 votes by elected heads of state. This was subsequently confirmed by a majority vote by the parliamentary MEPs, again, who are all elected.
Well the Hereditary Peers in the House of Lords are also elected but I give them about as much democratic credibility as I do her.

 

Greg Hook

Moderator & Reviewer
Can we have a thread where we can have an intelligent discussion about Brexit? Or is it just going to be the usual suspects derailing every thread all the time?
 

Pacifico

Distinguished Member
Can we have a thread where we can have an intelligent discussion about Brexit? Or is it just going to be the usual suspects derailing every thread all the time?
I dont think you can - it will be continual rehashes of the 2016 referendum causes for ever more
 

Bl4ckGryph0n

Distinguished Member
Well it's sorta not. So the delay was caused by a training exercise which was caused by the new UK arrival protocols for next year which was caused by Brexit.

So yes, Brexit wasn't directly responsible for this delay this week, but it also was, and it's a good indication of what will happen next year.
Wrong again. It was just training. Schiphol has said nothing that the training was in relation to Brexit. In fact they clearly said it had NOTHING to do with Brexit.

And you wondered earlier why you were being pulled up in this.

From the horses mouth Brexit and beyond: what will change at Schiphol?

As I said before, this has been going on for weeks, especially in combination with the building work and changes at Schiphol. Nothing to do with Brexit.
 

Sonic67

Distinguished Member
Having a relatively tiny number of people (UK MEPs) being paid is a small "negative" for the trade, regulation, and free movement benefits of EU membership.
If that's your view, then you should have voted to remain.
It also removes significant freedoms from millions of UK citizens,
The problem was the significant freedoms given to everyone in the EU to come to the UK.
and opens up the potential for a small number of people to make money by reducing standards (such as workers' rights, or reduction in food quality standards); clearly to the detriment of the majority of the population.
Wrong again. Workers rights in the UK are already beyond that of the EU. How do you think we got them? Again, all too politically dangerous. Take holiday pay:


Reality Check verdict: Unlikely - the UK had paid holiday before it joined the EU, and it would be politically dangerous to cut it back now.


The EU is imposing zero-hours contracts, the end of collective bargaining, casualisation and poverty pay across Europe as a part of its structural adjustment programme known as austerity.

Even the European TUC, which recently campaigned for a ‘Yes ‘vote in the Greek referendum for more austerity, openly admits that “cuts in salaries, cuts in public services and weakening collective bargaining rights are all on the agenda”.



Workers rights – threatened by the EU
The EU has forced zero hours contracts and torn up trade union agreements in Ireland, Portugal and Greece as the price of the bailout.

EU.JPG


Yes; based on that funny stuff called evidence. I'm surprised that people appear to be able to deny reality, but they do.
Exactly.

Mostly cheap schoolboy jibes frankly. The daft thing is; there are genuine issues with the workings of the EU parliament that he could have raised, but they wouldn't make good soundbites for his social media.
Just home truths. Which they don't like.
 

Bl4ckGryph0n

Distinguished Member
I agree with your recent set of posts, but you might stir up some backlash with the above. I do get your point, but maybe that one is best left unsaid.
Hmm “you might be stirring up some backlash...best left unsaid”

How about properly denouncing it?

To me that comes across like you agree, just pretend to be a tiny bit smarter to not say it out loud. Most odd but not surprising.


I was in Schipol a couple of times last week and saw this in action. It's swings and roundabouts. One time there was next to nobody in the queue and the British actually made it through quicker than the EU queue. The other time there was a long line. Seems like teething problems until they work out the most efficient way of doing it.

Edit: apologies, I replied to this at the start of catching up on my backlog and see it's subsequently been explained...
Hmmm the British actually made it through quicker than the EU queue???? There is no “British queue”.

How does that work considering absolutely nothing has changed yet?

I’ve been several times over and as recent as last Tuesday. No changes at all. Schiphol themselves confirmed that as well.

I’m really curious what on earth you are on about?
 

kav

Distinguished Member
Hmm “you might be stirring up some backlash...best left unsaid”

How about properly denouncing it?

To me that comes across like you agree, just pretend to be a tiny bit smarter to not say it out loud. Most odd but not surprising.



Hmmm the British actually made it through quicker than the EU queue???? There is no “British queue”.

How does that work considering absolutely nothing has changed yet?

I’ve been several times over and as recent as last Tuesday. No changes at all. Schiphol themselves confirmed that as well.

I’m really curious what on earth you are on about?
When I was going through passport control (twice, once on Wednesday and once on Friday of last week), they had the existing signs with all the usual flags for use of the automatic passport checks. And above one they had a temporary UK flag with an arrow for UK people to go through. It was obvious it was temporary as the main sign/flags were prefabricated plastic and this was a sticker applied to the front of it. As I said, one time when going through, the line of people going through that way was almost empty and moved quicker than the EU line. The other time it was busier and took longer.

Perhaps it wasn't a British/EU split but that's how it appeared, and that's how people queueing treated it when I was going through (both times).
 

Bl4ckGryph0n

Distinguished Member
When I was going through passport control (twice, once on Wednesday and once on Friday of last week), they had the existing signs with all the usual flags for use of the automatic passport checks. And above one they had a temporary UK flag with an arrow for UK people to go through. It was obvious it was temporary as the main sign/flags were prefabricated plastic and this was a sticker applied to the front of it. As I said, one time when going through, the line of people going through that way was almost empty and moved quicker than the EU line. The other time it was busier and took longer.

Perhaps it wasn't a British/EU split but that's how it appeared, and that's how people queueing treated it when I was going through (both times).
Very odd, see the article from Schiphol themselves that I linked before. I did not see anything like that.

Besides why didn’t you use the eGates?
 

Sonic67

Distinguished Member
Crook? Probably. She's dodgy, and with a dubious history of competence.

Unelected? She was elected by the European Parliament; by MEPs; whom we elect.
Farage was elected by the people. She wasn't. We had the Franco-German alliance grabbing places and a criminal running the bank. What say did we have in it?

Why should the EU President be down to such dodgy horse trading? That seems closer to Stalinist Russia.


Peeking into Europe’s dystopia was certainly the right medicine for pre-Brexit Britain, guaranteed to convert erstwhile moderates into raging Brexiteers as they looked on, aghast, at the shocking disconnect between elites and people.

Everything that is wrong with the EU was shamelessly on display: a Franco-German stitch-up; smaller countries being bulldozed, especially Eastern Europeans; a constitutional coup which sidelined the (useless) European Parliament; the fact that so many of the new generation of EU leaders have had brushes with the law that would have terminated their careers in the US or UK; their explicit commitment to a “United States of Europe” and a “European army” (about which we keep being lied to); and the singing of a national anthem we were promised wouldn’t exist when the European constitution was voted down.

For the past three years, the debate in Britain has missed the point: Brexiteers argue that we must leave because we voted to do so, rather than because the EU is bad; Remainers that we musn’t leave because it’s too risky, rather than because the EU is good. But we’ve forgotten what unites 65 per cent of the public, including many Remainers: a profound dislike of the EU as it actually is, of its preposterous schemes, its authoritarian nature, its commitment to harmonising and centralising everything.


Even this from the proEU Independent.


The European parliament’s political groups have united to condemn the selection of the next European Commission president, branding the process an undemocratic stitch-up by national governments.

EU leaders chose Ursula von der Leyen as their pick to replace Jean-Claude Juncker as the leader of the European Union’s executive branch despite the fact she was not on the ballot paper as a candidate and has no manifesto.


The European Council effectively ignored the European parliament’s spitzenkandidat, or “lead candidate” system, which was supposed to inject an element of democracy into the selection of commission president – instead nominating the defence minister, who is largely unknown outside Germany.


Pro EU Guardian.


If the European parliament approves Ursula von der Leyen’s nomination in two weeks’ time, the German defence minister will make for an unusual European commission president: a consensus candidate who has won the approval of western liberals and eastern rightwingers, yet is proving divisive in her home country.

However, in Germany the prospect of a German filling the commission presidency for the first time in 52 years has been met with outcries across the political spectrum.



Ursula von der Leyen is suspected of poor management and nepotism over her department's allocation of contracts and its decision to hire a consultant as her deputy. A parliamentary committee is set to investigate.
You're now ruled by Dominic Cummings; who wasn't elected by anyone.
Wrong. He's a spad. No different to any other employed in government. Ministers can't know everything so they need advisors.

1581712849211.png
 

IronGiant

Moderator
I'm serio
If that's your view, then you should have voted to remain.
This is a really odd response that you roll out to a lot of people that obviously voted to remain.

Unless behaviour improves rapidly 2-4 people will be leaving this thread.
 

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