Discussing the impact of Brexit

mcbainne

Distinguished Member
Well, well, well...fishing minister played no part in the discussions and didn’t even bother to read the deal when it was released. Perfectly sums up these muppets

 

Ron Hilditch

Well-known Member
Which of our one elected politicians will you contact to reverse this decision?


The article suggests “bowing to pressure from farmers”, would that be similar back door deals?
If they do bow to pressure from farmers? We can contact Defra. Who did you contact when the 67 exemptions were granted by the EU Commision?
Two sets of rules and accountability. The first one for the British Government and they must be held to the highest standards. And for people like you and many others the EU always gets a free pass. Quite a back handed complement for the British Government.
 

weaviemx5

Distinguished Member
If they do bow to pressure from farmers? We can contact Defra. Who did you contact when the 67 exemptions were granted by the EU Commision?
Two sets of rules and accountability. The first one for the British Government and they must be held to the highest standards. And for people like you and many others the EU always gets a free pass. Quite a back handed complement for the British Government.
As you can see, I didn’t give the EU a free pass, I never even mentioned them. I was simply quoting your post, suggesting that now we’re out of the EU we only have our own politicians to worry about, and pointing out that it’s still not actually that simple.

With regards to the “back room deal”, I assume you also have no evidence for that being why the EU exclusions were applied (I’m not saying it wasn’t), but the halcyon idea that our own Politicians/Government are somehow virtuous is a little naive.
 

Ron Hilditch

Well-known Member
As you can see, I didn’t give the EU a free pass, I never even mentioned them. I was simply quoting your post, suggesting that now we’re out of the EU we only have our own politicians to worry about, and pointing out that it’s still not actually that simple.

With regards to the “back room deal”, I assume you also have no evidence for that being why the EU exclusions were applied (I’m not saying it wasn’t), but the halcyon idea that our own Politicians/Government are somehow virtuous is a little naive.
Never said our Government are virtuous. The point was we know who to contact. Been in touch with my MP many times and he has always replied. It was you who seemed to infer, I wouldn't know who to contact?
If it was a case if contacting someone in Brussels to express concern, you would have been right. Because they were 28 nations all with their own concerns, sometimes in conflict eith each other. Would it have been an MEP, the person in charge of the CAP? In fact neither is the answer, as they have no power at all!
 

weaviemx5

Distinguished Member
Never said our Government are virtuous. The point was we know who to contact. Been in touch with my MP many times and he has always replied. It was you who seemed to infer, I wouldn't know who to contact?
If it was a case if contacting someone in Brussels to express concern, you would have been right. Because they were 28 nations all with their own concerns, sometimes in conflict eith each other. Would it have been an MEP, the person in charge of the CAP? In fact neither is the answer, as they have no power at all!
Surely you’d still contact your local MP, who could then escalate your issue through Parliament to address within the EU?
 

ChuckMountain

Distinguished Member
If they do bow to pressure from farmers? We can contact Defra. Who did you contact when the 67 exemptions were granted by the EU Commision?
We could contact the EU equivalent and escalate via our MEP. Do you really think that Defra have a hotline for these things? Who would you contact there? Why would you get a better response?
 

seville

Active Member
We did but we also had rations after the war for a long time.

Don't remember that being on the side of the bus or a benefit of the leave campaign ... :D
Yes. I forgot about the rations. But never mind. We have wrestled our sovrnteeee back from the evil EU. That's all there is to it.

No, it was not on the side the bus. The truth is, and not matter how much they deny it, even the Einsteins in the Leave electorate didn't know the workings and mechanics of the EU Customs Union and the Single Market.
 

Ron Hilditch

Well-known Member
We could contact the EU equivalent and escalate via our MEP. Do you really think that Defra have a hotline for these things? Who would you contact there? Why would you get a better response?
The chain is much smaller and therefore easier to access. Doesn't matter which Party they belong too. The Parliamentary Committees have multi-party membership and do have real power. So I would contact James Cartledge and keep in touch, until I got an answer. Done it more than once in the past and if needed will do it in the future. He is always helpful and listens. Do I expect it to influence Government Policy. Unlikely, but at least he needs to understand how we feel. It is too late complaining after the event. Seemingly the mistake too many of you Remainers made before the Referendum.
 

weaviemx5

Distinguished Member
So I would contact James Cartledge and keep in touch, until I got an answer. Done it more than once in the past and if needed will do it in the future. He is always helpful and listens.
His opinions ahead of the referendum certainly make for interesting reading;


- Sovereignty v trade

Whilst much of the Europe debate is highly legalistic and technical, one might summarise the journey of our membership as one of effectively exchanging sovereignty for economic benefit; pooling sovereignty over the years with our European partners, in order to maximise our benefit from trade and investment. I worry that leaving the EU would amount to us doing the opposite - gaining sovereignty at the expense of our economy.

..I can only vote on the position we are in now and I profoundly believe that Brexit is a step too far because it would entail very significant economic risk. Conversely, I regard our position of being in the EU but not in the euro as a very strong 'unique selling point' to the international investors upon whom we depend. I therefore take the view that it is in Britain's national economic interest to remain in a reformed EU.

- Leave v remain

I do not adhere to far-fetched arguments that either scenario of leave or remain will lead to some kind of doom-laden outcome in which the world collapses around us. However, I cannot imagine that many members of the public would wish to leave the EU if they thought it would make them poorer, and to do so would be a national humiliation. The challenge is therefore to look at the two options and try and work out which is most likely to be beneficial to our overall prosperity.

If we leave:

It is argued that we could 'cut red tape'. I know the 'petty rules' of Brussels can be maddening, but I am not convinced an 'independent' UK Government would be any less bureaucratic, and in fact, if we wanted to continue accessing the single market (and to do otherwise would be truly economically harmful) we would still need to abide by the rules of the EU - but without the ability to influence them!
 

klaxhu

Well-known Member
The cost of our weekly shop went up after we joined the Common Market. Give you one, Cane Sugar do we would buy Beet Sugar from Europe. All the Cane Sugar factories in the UK shutdown.
Sugar, Coffee and spices used to also rule the world. Times move on, and so should we. Or do you still go around in a horse carriage around town as transport?

It is called evolution. But all old people want is for things to stay the way they were. The young always disagree.

Again, nothing to do with the EU. Your solution is protectionism which is proven not to work in capitalism / a free market.
 

seville

Active Member
When we joined the EU many food items were no longer on the shelves. Food products from New Zealand, Australia and the West Indies were no longer available, due to punitive EU tariffs or even banned.
Food items were no longer on the shelves when we joined the EU? Well, all through out the years we were members, our shelves were so full we were spoilt for choice. A couple of weeks of leaving and we've begun to see empty shelves in our supermarkets.
 

richp007

Distinguished Member
The state of this response; I mean he can barely string a sentence together on it.

They never had a clue. Now after just two weeks there's talk of handing out compensation already....


....and of course he's now bumbled his way into another fiasco with the compensation remark, as he wasn't meant to say anything....


If even Tory Laura is saying it could get messy....
 
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klaxhu

Well-known Member
Never said our Government are virtuous. The point was we know who to contact. Been in touch with my MP many times and he has always replied. It was you who seemed to infer, I wouldn't know who to contact?
If it was a case if contacting someone in Brussels to express concern, you would have been right. Because they were 28 nations all with their own concerns, sometimes in conflict eith each other. Would it have been an MEP, the person in charge of the CAP? In fact neither is the answer, as they have no power at all!
We explained this several times: you voted for MEP‘s as well, you are represented. Stop saying you were not represented in the EU, it is just simply not true.
 

mcbainne

Distinguished Member
The state of this response; I mean he can barely string a sentence together on it.

They never had a clue. Now after just two weeks there's talk of handing out compensation already....


....and of course he's now bumbled his way into another fiasco with the compensation remark, as he wasn't meant to say anything....


If even Tory Laura is saying it could get messy....
This is brexit in a nutshell, an unmitigated shambles delivered by imbeciles, far from the ‘sea of opportunity’ promised

Fishermen now threatening to dump their rotting fish at the gates of WM


 

barkinglama

Member
^^^
The guy tweeting from Lochfyne langoustines Ltd admitted in earlier tweets that he did not vote in the referendum... 🤔
There were images where his business promoted brexit though
 

seville

Active Member
This is brexit in a nutshell, an unmitigated shambles delivered by imbeciles, far from the ‘sea of opportunity’ promised

Fishermen now threatening to dump their rotting fish at the gates of WM


Boris Johnson: "...massive opportunities...for Scotland and for the whole of the UK with the increase in quotas that we get from the deal: 25%..before the end of the transition period; hundreds of thousands of tons more fish....."

Yes, Prime Minister; but there is this small thing called glut. In case you hadn't noticed, Brexit has put up more trade barriers undermining the security of the EU market for our fish. The EU is not a captured market anymore so the question is: Can we sell this much vaunted increased quotas quickly and effectively?

It's no use smugly talking up "Brexit opportunities" when we've seen that our catch can very well end up rotting at the bottom of the dock. What if France or Spain decide to reduce their orders; what are we going to do then? Subsidise the UK fishing industry for all eternity? Invest in a cannery and put every single thing that comes from our waters in tin cans while humming "Rule Britannia", maybe?
 

ostewart

Well-known Member
The government have finally admitted they turned down the proposal for visa free tours by musicians, after trying to blame the EU. I know many people involved with the live music industry and this is utterly moronic, for an industry that contributes so much to be dealt a blow like this when it's on its knees.

 

richp007

Distinguished Member
The government have finally admitted they turned down the proposal for visa free tours by musicians, after trying to blame the EU. I know many people involved with the live music industry and this is utterly moronic, for an industry that contributes so much to be dealt a blow like this when it's on its knees.

No-one is shocked. Apart from perhaps Ron who insisted it was the big bad EU's fault. Of course :laugh:

Piss poor but entirely expected. I think I posted something about how they'd made a "counter-offer" but this mysterious offer was nowhere to be found either :rolleyes:
 

Unlucky Alf

Well-known Member
fudgeing hell, can you imagine what the DM would say if the roles of the EU and UK were reversed? They’d probably be calling for anyone caught bringing a ham sandwich in to be hung from the nearest lamppost
 

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