disadvantages of patch panel in a home network setting?

coolmanfever

Standard Member
Hello all,

I started a thread earlier on how to setup patch panel in small home networking setting and received lots of people recommending patch panel for good cable organization and different ideas on how to make the connections.

But are there any disadvantages of having patch panel in home network setup esp. for someone like me who will not touch and modify the network in the future once first setup?

I can think of few:
1.add extra cost to equipment setup because I need to buy patch panel and frame that panel can mount on
2. add another layer of complexity to the network. Instead of ethernet cable connect directly to switch, patch cables are needed to connect from panel to switch. As result, more cost is added to buy patch panel and add another point of error at patch panel keystone jack + RJ45 jack.
3. If the cable are stranded type, then more difficult to finish them in keystone jack on patch panel

What do you guys think? Any disadvantages?

1321079-12a2e3e16a4916e713a85d6b3ddbd96e.jpg
 

neilball

Well-known Member
As soon as you have a reasonable number of cables to terminate then a patch panel makes a lot of sense - it’s neater, more reliable (both in terms of initial termination success and long term operation as it avoids regular movement/flexing of solid core cabling), and makes cable identification much easier (no fighting through a tangled mess of cables to find the one you want).

It also allows the use of other rack mount accessories to keep things easy to manage & reconfigure. For example you can but patch leads of just the right length to avoid long snakes of unused cable piling up, and colour code connections to help easy visual identification.
 

mushii

Distinguished Member
Everything @neilball says. Additionally the CatX cable specification requires that either end is terminated into some form of punched down connector for fixed structured cabling and not terminated into RJ45 plugs.
 

Kristian

Well-known Member
1. Maybe a bit more, maybe not. Putting plugs on solid needs a decent crimper. Takes longer to terminate to Plugs so how valuable is your time. £20-£30 for a PP is naff all. You don’t need a frame, just screw/fix PP and switch to the cupboard sides if you don’t want a frame.
2. No more complex as you have to terminate the cable some how. Plugs much harder to do than PP. bought patch leads will just work. More stable as the solid cabling is fixed in place therefore want break under movement fatigue.
3. If you’ve used stranded then you’d use plugs so a moot point.

you’ve had good advice from four people to use a PP if solid core, at least three are professionals...
 

mushii

Distinguished Member
With all due respect @coolmanfever this thread is very disrespectful to all of the people who gave you advice in your previous thread. It reads like you don’t believe the advice that you were given in that thread and you have come here for a different answer to validate a pre-conceived position on the subject. You could have just as easily asked this question in that thread.

I am not posting this to berate you, but to give you some advice on good forum etiquette and how not to upset the people who give their time up to help you with their knowledge and expertise.
 

coolmanfever

Standard Member
With all due respect @coolmanfever this thread is very disrespectful to all of the people who gave you advice in your previous thread. It reads like you don’t believe the advice that you were given in that thread and you have come here for a different answer to validate a pre-conceived position on the subject. You could have just as easily asked this question in that thread.

I am not posting this to berate you, but to give you some advice on good forum etiquette and how not to upset the people who give their time up to help you with their knowledge and expertise.
sorry. my intend to create the thread is for education. I do believe the advices. I just want to hear what other people though about not going with patch panel. I still plan to ahead and get a patch panel. In fact based on the recommendation of everyone, I placed an order for the following items to start building patch panel and switch:

Amazon product
Amazon product
Amazon product
 

mickevh

Distinguished Member
The "patch panel" you linked is not what we mean by a patch panel - it's essentially just a facia for housing keystone jacks (which it looks like you'd have to purchase separately.)

The more common type of patch panels, and I suspect what most of us refer to, have IDC "punch down" blocks on the back. Here's one (I don't recognise the brand, it's just the first one I could find with pictures, there's plenty of others to choose from)...

Amazon product
 

coolmanfever

Standard Member
thanks. I would think keystone ones would be easier to fix if there is problem with jacket in the future?

Plus, I am getting contractor to hire someone to do the termination into patch panel. Maybe it is easier to find someone to converting in keystone than into built in panel?
 

neilball

Well-known Member
I’ve always found termination onto punch down blocks to be the easiest and most reliable termination methods, and it’s often easier to see clearly how the cable has been terminated. I prefer to use patch panels where their is a cable management bar at the rear of the panel and where the punch down blocks present the cable perpendicular to the panel, so the individual cables can be tied to the bar and don’t lie on top of each other along the length of the patch panel. But at the end of the day once the cables are properly terminated and (more importantly) properly tested/qualified/certified then it’s unlikely that the patch panel needs removing to check the connections again. It’s simply my preference to present the cabling neatly and tidily even where it’s not easily seen as it’s part of my systematic approach to work ie spend the time to do things properly and tidily even if the customer never gets to see.
 

mushii

Distinguished Member
I agree with @neilball. I find it easier to terminate the cables on the Patch Panels that have individual cable supports behind each IDC block. This kind

1604653729787.png


rather than this kind

1604653866347.png
 

mickevh

Distinguished Member
Isn't there some kind of stipulation for the higher (6A and up) that the cables are presented at 90 degrees (IIRC there's also some recommendations on max number in a bunch) so we can't lead them all in from the side like olden days...? (I haven't read any of the standards for years.)
 

The latest video from AVForums

Podcast: Q Acoustics Q3030i, Humax Aura, Roku Streambar & WandaVision Reviews and more...
Top Bottom