Disabled parking

a l e x

Distinguished Member
What is it with lazy sods parking in disabled bays?!

I've no problem with people who genuinely need them using them but come on! I'm sat waiting for the gf parked up and some fat lazy slob just rocked up, dumped his car in a disabled bay and waddled off into costa. There must be 50 empty spaces here!

There's another car too... Brand new, tiny merc convertible. The 20 year old running into boots really doesn't look too disabled...

Lazy sods.

Rant over. ;)
 

LeeDicko

Well-known Member
The thing that really bugs me, is a lot of people don't understand why they are there.

Sure it's closer to the shop or whatever, but the more important thing is that the spaces are wider, meaning it's easier for people to get wheelchairs etc. in.

Just imagine if you were a wheelchair user and all the disabled spaces were taken so you had to park somewhere else (where there was a space free beside you too) and by the time you got out of the shop someone had parked beside you (not their fault, they don't know!) so you don't have enough room to get your chair in.

You'd end up having to wait in the car park before the person beside you had finished doing their bits and pieces before you could go home! (yes this has happened to me lol).

Such is life I suppose, can't let it get ya down!
 

signs

Banned
I blame greedy shopping centres , make all spaces wider so we don't need a frikin can opener to get out of our cars I say :)
 

BomoLad

Well-known Member
I don't see the problem unless a disabled person is actually prevented from parking somewhere. Otherwise it's like being annoyed at someone casually standing in the exit way to a building. "Bastard, look at him, what if this place suddenly burns down and he's stuck in the way". Unless the situation arises it's a futile annoyance.

But a lot of people who moan about this also use disabled toilets or the ramped entrance to a building. Why is preventing someone temporarily from parking any more of an evil than temporarily stopping them entry to somewhere or momentarily from having a crap?
 
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Thug

Moderator
It bugs me too.
Both of my parents are disabled (due to age related illness) and if I see an able bodied person parking in a disabled bay it winds me up.
Ok, if its a 24 hour shop and in the dead of night with an empty car park then fair enough, but how many times do we see these people doing their weekly shop or take the last space just to make it easier for them. Its just selfish.
 

Mr.D

Distinguished Member
I think its not such a big deal as long as there are plenty of other spaces available in the disabled zone and they are just going to be 5 mins.

However if everyone took this attitude they would be blocked all the time.

We have a disabled badge for my eldest daughter which we only use when she is travelling , even then we won't always use a disabled spot. Quite often I've had busy bodies come up and glare at me for parking in a disabled spot. The fact they haven't noticed my daughter is no excuse for their self righteous attitude.

Not every disabled person is in a wheelchair and disabled people have every right to drive flash cars too.

You can also do a search and see what I had to do with an unsympathetic neighbour who insisted on parking outside our house despite them having a driveway.
 
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aVdub

Banned
One that bugs me is those that abuse the disabled badges they might have and the person it's being used for is not in the car when it's being used in a disabled bay/double yellows!
 
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mariosx

Active Member
If it was up to me, cars that are illegally parked in disabled bays would be vandalised. Simple as that.
 

Wahreo

Distinguished Member
Problem with the Brits is that they don't say anything. They simply moan about it to their Wife or post a topic on a forum about it.

Carry a notepad in the car and leave a note on their windscreen or politely confront them.

Whack some vaseline on your stiff upper lip and this country would be a better place for it.:)
 

sophies hero

Active Member
I know this wont be a popular view but i dont agree with there even being disabled spaces.

We're constantly forced in to equal rights these days and a disabled person can expect to apply for any job they see fit and be treated the same as an able bodied person so why cant they be expected to cross a car park before they spend an hour shopping like the rest of us?

Its the same with parent bays (and i have a young child and one on the way) its nobody elses problem my wife wants to go the shops with our daughter.

I do take your point that the extra width of bays are needed but surely the most sensible thing would be to put the extra wide spaces right at the back where lazy people wont use them and the disabled people can have free choice if they want/need to use them?
 

a l e x

Distinguished Member
Problem with the Brits is that they don't say anything. They simply moan about it to their Wife or post a topic on a forum about it.

Carry a notepad in the car and leave a note on their windscreen or politely confront them.

Whack some vaseline on your stiff upper lip and this country would be a better place for it.:)

Funny you say that - much to the gfs annoyance I couldn't help myself and said something to both of them!
 

njdbaxter

Well-known Member
If it was up to me, cars that are illegally parked in disabled bays would be vandalised. Simple as that.

if it was up to me, half the people with disable badges would have them taken off them. A lot got them years ago and after mobility/injury improved, they were never reacessed, so happily stroll about with ease yet park in a disabled bay. If they can walk around a mall for a few hours they really don't need a disabled badge or to park close to the mall.
 

Jules

Distinguished Member
Not all disabilities are outwardly visible. My dad is 81 and looks quite healthy, but he has a problem with his nerve endings which means he can walk quite normally but only for a very short distances.
When he starts off he looks like a spritely senior citizen but he quickly starts to lose control of his legs and his balance.

Also people with heart or lung problems won't immediately look disabled.

It winds me up when people assume the worst about people using disabled parking spaces.
 

njdbaxter

Well-known Member
Its the same with parent bays (and i have a young child and one on the way) its nobody elses problem my wife wants to go the shops with our daughter.


have you ever gone shopping with a infant or young child. They tend to wonder off. The parent bays are there for the kids safety, not just so they have more room to open car doors.

i'd rather parents where given family spaces, than for a infant or young child to wonder off and get ****ted by my car when leaving the car park.

however they should soley be used by those with young children. Do you really need to park in a family space if you kid is 10 or older
 

njdbaxter

Well-known Member
Not all disabilities are outwardly visible. My dad is 81 and looks quite healthy, but he has a problem with his nerve endings which means he can walk quite normally but only for a very short distances.
When he starts off he looks like a spritely senior citizen but he quickly starts to lose control of his legs and his balance.

Also people with heart or lung problems won't immediately look disabled.

It winds me up when people assume the worst about people using disabled parking spaces.

if he can suddenly lose control of his legs and balance like you say, then should he be driving?
 

sophies hero

Active Member
have you ever gone shopping with a infant or young child. They tend to wonder off. The parent bays are there for the kids safety, not just so they have more room to open car doors.

i'd rather parents where given family spaces, than for a infant or young child to wonder off and get ****ted by my car when leaving the car park.

however they should soley be used by those with young children. Do you really need to park in a family space if you kid is 10 or older

I've been shopping loads of times with my 2yr old. Not once have i let her "wonder off" in a car park.
 

sophies hero

Active Member
Not all disabilities are outwardly visible. My dad is 81 and looks quite healthy, but he has a problem with his nerve endings which means he can walk quite normally but only for a very short distances.
When he starts off he looks like a spritely senior citizen but he quickly starts to lose control of his legs and his balance.

Also people with heart or lung problems won't immediately look disabled.

It winds me up when people assume the worst about people using disabled parking spaces.

With respect if he cant walk that far would the extra 30-40m across a car park make much difference to the shopping trip?
 

sophies hero

Active Member
Not all disabilities are outwardly visible. My dad is 81 and looks quite healthy, but he has a problem with his nerve endings which means he can walk quite normally but only for a very short distances.
When he starts off he looks like a spritely senior citizen but he quickly starts to lose control of his legs and his balance.

Also people with heart or lung problems won't immediately look disabled.

It winds me up when people assume the worst about people using disabled parking spaces.

With respect if he cant walk that far would the extra 30-40m across a car park make much difference to the shopping trip?
 

Mr.D

Distinguished Member
We're constantly forced in to equal rights these days and a disabled person can expect to apply for any job they see fit and be treated the same as an able bodied person so why cant they be expected to cross a car park before they spend an hour shopping like the rest of us?

We have a society that does everything it can to avoid unecessarily penalising people's existence because of a disability they have. Something as inconsequential as having a disabled bay in a car park is a trivial concession to deal with from society's point of view.

The reason that disabled badges are controlled and allocated on an individual basis is primarily because "normal" people like you do not have the necessary knowledge and experience to adequately judge who merits one and who doesn't.

If you feel that you are constantly "forced" in to accepting equal rights for all then I suggest you re-evaluate why you feel that way in the first place before you critique the practicalities of its application in the real world.
 

BomoLad

Well-known Member
When I see someone park in a disabled pay who isn't disabled I look at their car parked surrounded by four or five empty spaces either side and think - that monster! What if 10 people who have a special form of disability whereby it gets worse unless they simultaneously park symmetrically with at least nine other disabled drivers, suddenly turn up?

I once saw someone in Tesco lean temporarily on one of those disabled scooter machines with the basket on the front to tie their shoe lace. I would have punched them in anger if children weren't watching.

Like the parking incident it was someone in theory stopping a hypothetical disabled person from doing something for a brief period of time. Nothing gets my goat more than that.
 

Jules

Distinguished Member
I have no issue with anyone popping into a disabled toilet or using one of many free disabled parking bays at a quiet time.

The point I was making is simply that you should never judge someone on their appearance.
Just because someone looks able bodied, does not mean they have the physical capacity to carry out daily tasks without some considerable difficulty.
 

Saldawop

Distinguished Member
If it was up to me, cars that are illegally parked in disabled bays would be vandalised. Simple as that.

And anybody caught cowardly vandalising a car should probably be left in a state where they need a disabled badge.

Sent from my GT-N7100 using Tapatalk 2
 

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