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digitalv35mm (picture quality)

Discussion in 'Photography Forums' started by G.M, Nov 30, 2002.

  1. G.M

    G.M
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    I've got a 2million pixel digital camera. In terms of picture quality, how does this compare to a 35mm compact camera?
    regards,
    G.M.
     
  2. KarlRobinson

    KarlRobinson
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    Film grain or resolution on any size is 1000dpi

    So, 10 x 8 = 10000 x 8000 pixels, 5 x 4 = 5000 x 4000 pixels
    2 1/4 = 2250, 35mm = 1417 x 944

    Obviously these all need to be optical and not interpolated, also taking into account focal length.
     
  3. shoehorn

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    I read somewhere that you'd need twenty million (plus) pixels to match 35mm camera - but I'd assume that would be for a higher end one.....
     
  4. BigAde

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    I think I read that same article.

    Think it was along the lines of:
    In theory you would need 20 mega-pixels to match the resolution of 35mm film. But you also need to consider the degradation from the lens. I think it concluded that realistically a 6MP digital camera would be needed to get similar resolution to a good 35mm with good lenses. A compact 35mm is unlikely to offer such good lenses, so perhaps 3MP may be a more realistic comparison.

    No idea how true this all is - it's just my recollection of an article I read in a magazine once.
     
  5. KarlRobinson

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    The reason most articles quote higher figures is because of the CCD size within a camera. If you reproduced a 35mm, a 24 x 36mm CCD would be needed, as only high end SLR's have this a higher resolution is needed on a smaller CCD to grab the same level of detail.
     
  6. nunew33

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    karl if I understand you right then, discounting lens, a 1.3 megapixel ccd has the capability to capture the same detail as a 35 mm film. But its size combined with the quality of the lens determines the ability for the digital image to match that of the analog. So a 4 mp decent compact will definately provode the basis for a better print than a good 35mm compact, but although having a theoretical higher theoretical resoultion, would struggle to match a semi decent SLR with semidecent optics.

    Is this the reason why the canon EOS 1 has a relatively lower resolution than some cameras yet still yields a higher price?
     
  7. KarlRobinson

    KarlRobinson
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    I think the EOS 1 has a high price because of the true size CCD, I'm sure it will drop.

    The trouble with resolution vs 35mm is how do you determine when the 35mm has maxed out. You could say excessive film grain, lack of focus etc etc, then you can scan a 35mm to almost any res with a good scanner.

    I think the only way you really compare is to output a digital camera image to a film recorder the scan it back in, or have very high quality interpolation within your software.
     

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