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Digital SLR advice needed for SLR Newbie!

Discussion in 'Photography Forums' started by Roohster, Jul 24, 2005.

  1. Roohster

    Roohster
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    Finally taken the plunge and bought a digital SLR... and realised how little I know!
    First question - when I transfer pictures to my laptop, they go across at 72 PPI, no matter how I do it.
    The pictures are huge - 48" x 32", but at this low resolution... or have I got it all wrong?
    I know when I transfer file from my old Ixus, they used to be 180 or 300 PPI.
    Am I doing someting wrong?
     
  2. MarkE19

    MarkE19
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    Well to transfer my pictures I put the CF card into a USB reader. Open a folder of the reader on the PC and just drag them across to another folder. This way I get an exact copy of those on the CF card.

    Mark.
     
  3. Roohster

    Roohster
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    That's exactly what I'm doing.:confused:
     
  4. seany

    seany
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  5. RobertP

    RobertP
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    I'm no expert on print settings but I think that is all it is you are seeing.

    The picture from the camera is x pixels across by y pixels high - end of story.
    Depending on how you space those pixels out across an inch on a sheet of paper you will get various picture sizes if you print the picture.

    I'd guess there is some setting that is preset to 72 ppi when you transfer the files? And what are you viewing them with - maybe that makes the preset print resolution?

    Trying to confirm it is just about print setting I tried a search - came up with this link to Bob Atkins site which confirms it is and explains it.
     
  6. martynk

    martynk
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    72 dpi is a default setting in PS - it doesn't really mean anything. You can change the settings in PS - use "Image" + "Image Size" then pick the ones you want. I suggest you select "Bicubic" resampling for this. Most other editing software should have similar options. You don't have to bother about this if you're having prints done commercially - just tell them what size of prints (inches or cms) you want, and they'll print at 300 dpi or the next best setting, depending on the size and the resolution of the original files.
     
  7. adrianl

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    The only 'fixed' thing about the file is the size in pixels. The ppi figure just depends arbitrarily on ht edimensions you (or the software) sets. 72dpi is the standard windows screen resolution (on a Mac it's 96dpi but no matter). If the file is being displayed at 72dpi it just means you're viewing at 'actual size'.

    Don't know what image viewing software you're using but there will always be an option to scale to size of screen. The dpi only becomes 'fixed' when you define the dimensions in an app like Photoshp when you plan to print out the file. If the horizontal size is say 2560 pixels wide, and you stipulate a print 10 inches wide, then the actual ppi is 256ppi. Don't tick the 'resample' box as you don't want the actual number of pixels in the image to change, unless you're deliberately resizing it for say emailing a smaller file, or trying to 'upsample' to print large.
     
  8. Roohster

    Roohster
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    Thanks for that guys!

    So, what resolution should I change them to for printing?
    I've been using 300 dpi with quite good results, any point going higher?
    Using a Canon Pixma ip4000 printer.

    Cheers.
     
  9. dejongj

    dejongj
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    Don't bother changing it for your printer, the printer-driver will take care of it when you need a certain size....

    Haven't you read any of the previous links *smile*
     
  10. tomson

    tomson
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    You've got those the wrong way round.
     
  11. MattB1

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    I think there's some confusion here between PPI and DPI. With regards to PPI (Pixels per inch), 72 PPI is just the number used by most apps for screen viewing your images probably because you wouldn't notice a significant difference on screen if this was increased.
    Digital pictures are a fixed number of pixels high by a fixed number of pixels wide depending on the resolution of the camera. When you print a picture though you'd normally increase PPI to 200 or 300 so that the resulting print is good quality. Because images are a fixed number of pixels this will shrink the size of the resulting print.

    e.g
    A 2mp image = 1600 * 1200 pixels at 300 PPI would result in a print of 5.22" * 4".

    DPI is used when reffering to printers as the number of dots of ink the printer will print per inch and has no direct relationship to PPI. Obviously the higer DPI of the printer, the better the results.
     

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