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Differences between DV and analogue

Discussion in 'Camcorders, Action Cams & Video Editing Forum' started by arief_lim, Jul 11, 2002.

  1. arief_lim

    arief_lim
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    Hi all,
    I'm new in this video thing, so maybe you guys could help me out...
    I have Sony DCR-TRV140E camcorder, right now I'm using a TV tuner card to transfer the video into computer, using S-Video cable, it can do 29fps with drop frame about 10% and the quality is fair enough...
    But now, I'm considering to buy a DV card or 1394 card to do the transfer, but i'm still wondering what other benefit I could get besides better movie quality?
    Is it going to have non-drop frame if you use a DV card?
    Last question, which codec is the fastest with decent video quality to use?

    By the way my comp spec is:
    Celeron 566
    RAM 196 MB
    HD 15GB
    SpaceTV Tuner card

    Software for capture: VirtualDub

    Thanks......
     
  2. kevenh

    kevenh
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    With DV video, if you use a 1394 port to transfer the video to your pc, the video on the pc is exactly the same as on the camera.
    Because it's just a file transfer.

    Hope that little snippet helps, 'cos I'm wonderring if I misunderstood your questions!
     
  3. Dubbing Mixer

    Dubbing Mixer
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    The time code issue is complex. But, if I were you I would set the camera up to do 25fps (Unless of course it's a US import NTSC only.)
     
  4. arief_lim

    arief_lim
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    kevenh:
    Using 1394 port, is it just like copy a file from the camera into computer? If that so, the transfer time would be more faster than if I capture it using a capture card?

    Dubbing Mixer:
    What did u mean by timecode? actually I was considering to get the camera into 25fps as the video system I use is PAL..

    Sorry if my english is bad....
    Thanks
     
  5. kevenh

    kevenh
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    Arief,
    I hadn't realised English wasn't your natural language!

    Anyway, just a quick cut'n'paste from some DV glossary web page I found: -

    Digital Capture Cards : Generally in the form of a PCI card that needs to be sloted into your PC. The card provides a firewire interface allowing a digital camcorder to be connected to the computer. Add some software and you have a complete editing system.

    I don't know why there are half a dozen names for the same connection!
    I believe capture card, 1394, firewire, ohci, and IEEE1394 are all the same thing in the DV world

    Oh! The DV glossary is here. It's not very big :eek: but if it is accurate...
     
  6. kevenh

    kevenh
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    Timecode is information included when you record to the tape. It is in hours, minutes, seconds and frames.
    This is very useful when it comes to editing, and deciding which bits need to hit the cutting room floor, and which bits of video will make it.

    I have yet to get heavily involved in DV editing, but I've read that it's better to record black all along your tapes before using to film your material. This is to do with getting continuos timecode.
     
  7. Dubbing Mixer

    Dubbing Mixer
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    KevenH is correct on all counts.

    Arief,

    If you live in a PAL area and your camera is intended for that market, it will either record 50 fields per second interlaced to give 25 Frames Per Second or, it may do 25 fps progressive scan. In any event, it is likely the default time code will be 25fps.

    'Black and burst(ing)' tapes before use was more important with analogue but is still a good method of ensuring continuous time-code from beginning to end. There should be something in your camera manual about the specifics of this, but all it really means is recording black over the whole tape before you use it. (Leave the lens cap on) One tip which may help you in editing is to start each tape's time-code at a different hour. So, tape 1 starts at 01:00:00:00 and so on. Helps to identify which tape shots come from if you need to redigitise them into an editor at any point. (If the tapes are longer than an hour, you could make them start at 2 hour intervals.
     
  8. arief_lim

    arief_lim
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    kevenh
    Thanks a lot for your explanation and the links u provide me about further DV terms

    Dubbing Mixer
    Thanks a lot for your explanation although it's a bit confusing at first, but i'm sure i'll get a grip on it at no time...

    :)

    But hey I'm still have one last question if you guys don't mind...
    which codec do you think the best in quality and speed for compressing the video into VCD...
     

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