Difference between HA, HG, HX, HE video mode?

Alex Ethridge

Standard Member
Using Panasonic HDC-TM700 camcorder. On page 66 of the downloaded manual, it lists four recording modes, HA, HG, HX and HE; but, all are listed in the manual at 1920x1080. HA favors picture quality and HE favors file size.

The recording times available on a given media are different; but, aside from that I cannot find any information anywhere that tells me (aside from file size) what is different about the files these recording modes make.

My guess is that the compression is different. In other words, the least compression is at HA (and maybe less lossy) and more compression at HE and therefore maybe more lossy. Is that right? If not, then what?

It would be nice if someone could refer me to some documentation on this.

Here's the manual if you care to download it. Relevant pages are 66 and 147; but, aside from file sizes being different, there's nothing of value there.
http://service.us.panasonic.com/OPER...CHS700-MUL.PDF
 

PhilipL

Well-known Member
Hi

Using Panasonic HDC-TM700 camcorder. On page 66 of the downloaded manual, it lists four recording modes, HA, HG, HX and HE; but, all are listed in the manual at 1920x1080. HA favors picture quality and HE favors file size.

The recording times available on a given media are different; but, aside from that I cannot find any information anywhere that tells me (aside from file size) what is different about the files these recording modes make.

My guess is that the compression is different. In other words, the least compression is at HA (and maybe less lossy) and more compression at HE and therefore maybe more lossy. Is that right? If not, then what?

It would be nice if someone could refer me to some documentation on this.

Here's the manual if you care to download it. Relevant pages are 66 and 147; but, aside from file sizes being different, there's nothing of value there.
http://service.us.panasonic.com/OPER...CHS700-MUL.PDF

It is quality v size. HA mode is the best quality, I wouldn't bother with any of the lower modes unless you are very stuck for space.

As you have guessed, smaller files equal more compressed and poorer quality.

Regards

Phil
 

Emerton

Active Member
To answer your question, higher quality uses higher bitrate, = more storage memory used.
Higher quality (bitrate) settings may make life more difficult for editing on PC with border line spec, but as PhilipL says, you may as well shoot at best quality if there is no reason not to.
 

Alex Ethridge

Standard Member
Thanks for the replies. I don't understand bitrate; but, I do understand more compression producing lower quality.

So I am sure I understand this, all modes for this camera (HA, HG, HX, HE) make 1920x1080 frames at 60 frames per second and the only difference is the amount of compression. Is that correct?
 

Emerton

Active Member
Strictly speaking, bitrate is not the same as compression, but the principle still applies- the better the quality, the more memory is gobbled up.
 

Martini2771

Standard Member
I'll offer you opportunity to compare these modes by most important measure: picture!

I've been bothered by this question at the very beginning, so I filmed in (almost) every mode and uploaded raw file to YouTube. All are filmed in Intelligent Auto

Tip: you can start multiple browsers and play each video in each browser, so both or all videos are at your screen at once.

1080/50p: YouTube - ‪Panasonic HDC-SD700 1080/50p (28 Mbps)‬‏
HA: YouTube - ‪Panasonic HDC-SD700 HA (17 Mbps)‬‏
HG: YouTube - ‪Panasonic HDC-SD700 HG (13 Mbps)‬‏
HX: YouTube - ‪Panasonic HDC-SD700 HX (9 Mbps)‬‏

Sorry, I didn't uploaded HE mode, but... is a bit worse than HX :)

Cloudy and a little misty afternoon like this is not the best place to compare, but at least something...
 

EngIan

Novice Member
Just to correct one small error in the original post (I assume it was an error or a misread).

The HE mode although it outputs 1920x1080 pixel format video, in fact works by only recording a 1440x1080 pixel video stream. The 1440 horizontal pixels are mapped back to 1920 pixels during replay processing.
 

Bob++

Active Member
Two questions:
1. Do all modes record "progressive"? as opposed to "interlaced".

There is a button to switch between "i" and "p"

2. Do all modes record at 50 frames per second?

If it was purchased in the UK then yes - obviously Americans get 60

If anyone could confirm this, I would greatly appreciate it. :thumbsup:

hope this helps
 

grahamlthompson

In memoriam
Strictly speaking, bitrate is not the same as compression, but the principle still applies- the better the quality, the more memory is gobbled up.

The two are entirely related if the same compression system is used (H264/AVC in this case) and the same output. Take 1080i50 at 12mbps compared to 17mbps, at the lower bitrate more of the original data is lost. You don't normally get the choice though on a camcorder the bitrate is fixed according to the amount of video data you are recording.

Basically for HD recording on a UK camcorder ) the bitrates used increase as follows

1440 x 1080 interlaced (25 fps)
1920 x 1080 interlaced (25 fps)
1920 x 1080 progressive (50 fps)
 

grahamlthompson

In memoriam
Two questions:
1. Do all modes record "progressive"? as opposed to "interlaced".

2. Do all modes record at 50 frames per second?

If anyone could confirm this, I would greatly appreciate it. :thumbsup:

Not normally though I can't speak for the specific camcorder. Generally only 720p at 1280 x 720 and 1080p at 1920 x 1080 offer 50 fps recording (the latter is not blu-ray compliant). Some may add 1920 x 1080 at 24fps (blu-ray standard) or 1920 x 1080 at 25 fps.

For 1080 line recording the lowest quality will normally be 1440 x 1080 interlaced followed by 1920 x 1080 both interlaced 25 fps.
 

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