DH67CF Consumer Infrared Headers

talos2010

Standard Member
Hi,

Getting a Intel DH67CF motherboard and it has a Consumer Infrared Headers - does anybody know if this is usable as a standard eHome receiver, and if so where I can get hold of a IR receiver?
 

talos2010

Standard Member
For anyone interested it took 9 days from payment for it to arrive at my door. No duty to pay, and worked perfectly.
 
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LittleGreyCat

Standard Member
Just started looking now - anyomne else found a CIR receiver?

AIUI a CIR receiver is for receiving from a remote control.

IR device is for two way communication over IR e.g talking to mobile phones.

My Asrock Z68 Extreme4 Gen 3 MoBo has both headers.

As I am looking for HTPC functionality a CIR receiver would probably be a good thing (unless a USB based IR receiver mounted on the case can do the same job).

Cheers

LGC

P.S. found The Internet Group
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/IR-Receiver-w-Cable-Intel-CIR-Media-Extreme-MBs-/230648964964
who claim to be the only CIR suppliers anywhere.

Also found
http://shop.inteset.com/Products/13-ir-receiver-wcable-and-mounting-bracket-for-cir-mb-with-mce-backlit-remote.aspx
who also claim to be the only CIR suppliers anywhere.

Which looks like
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/IR-Receiver-w-Cable-CIR-MB-MCE-Back-Lit-Remote-/330581178980
which is very slightly cheaper - The Internet Group again.

Still no luck with a UK supplier.
 
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talos2010

Standard Member
I searched everywhere for one in the UK but couldn't find one. Getting a CIR will be the same as getting a Microsoft eHome receiver. The advantages of the CIR are that (assuming your mobo supports it), you can power up from S5 (off), you don't use up a USB port, and don't have a fugly receiver box.

One disadvantage of using CIR is that you will generally find the IR reception is not as good (less angle, slightly less range) than using the Microsoft receiver - this does depend on the IR opening of the case though.
 
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jameson_uk

Well-known Member
Ordered one from the internet group's Ebay site. Turned up yesterday but not sure I will get chance to try it until the new year. Will let you know how it goes (also got one if their MCE receivers too to check that out too)
 

LittleGreyCat

Standard Member
Now confused myself a bit.:rolleyes:

The IRDA header is five pin with one dummy,
The CIR header is four pin.

IRDA has:

IRTX
IRRX
GND
+5VSB

CIR has:

IRTX
IRRX
GND
ATX+5VSB

So what is the difference between the two connections?
Both have a TX/RX pair, a GND and +5V

Does the IR receivers handle different frequencies?

Otherwise, can you connect an IRDA receiver to the CIR header?

Cheers
LGC
 

WheresMyArtisan

Active Member
They are totally different protocols. IRDA is basically a serial port via infra red, and only for very short range. CIR uses RC-5 (I think).

While they both have transmit, receive, power and ground they are fundamentally different. Plugging one into the other would be like plugging a phone into a network socket - it wouldn't work!

Thinking about it, I don't know why the CIR has a transmit - it must be used for some devices.

I'm sure wikipedia would tell you everything about either of them.
 

LittleGreyCat

Standard Member
They are totally different protocols. IRDA is basically a serial port via infra red, and only for very short range. CIR uses RC-5 (I think).

Wiki bashing, but mostly Linux related sources, suggests that RC6 is the current most used CIR protocol but that there are no published standards and a wide variety of modulation frequencies are used.

IRDA has a formalised stack along OSI principles.

CIR is just a serial bit stream with minimal structure.

There is some confusing overlap e.g. some IRDA receivers can handle CIR data.

I do know that my old Compaq PDA could generate TV control codes and I'm pretty sure that was an IRDA device.

<snip>

Thinking about it, I don't know why the CIR has a transmit - it must be used for some devices.

As I understand it the CIR transmit allows a PC (or other media device) to control another media device e.g. your PC could control your TV or CD player or amplifier just like any universal remote control.

I'm sure wikipedia would tell you everything about either of them.

You'd think.

Unfortunately not, or at least not a straightforward answer to "What is the difference between CIR and IRDA?" but it did provide a lot of (mostly old) further reading references.

I think it is more or less (ignoring all the side issues):

CIR is for remote controls, and is a very simple dumb protocol but has a 10m range.

IRDA is for data transfer between devices such as phones, laptops and PDAs. It is a robust protocol with published standards.
It is usually short range, in the order of 1m or less.
It has fallen out of fashion with the recent popularity of Bluetooth.
Some IRDA devices can communicate using CIR protocols with CIR devices.
The opposite does not apply.:)

Cheers

LGC
 

jameson_uk

Well-known Member
Just to say I have had a play with both the CIR and USB receivers from intesat. The CIR one worked once I had installed the driver and enabled it in the bios. In fact it worked flawlessly with my official MCE remote and keyboard. even wakes from totally off without having to wire it up to the power switch.

The other remote did install straight away as an eHome receiver but some if the extended buttons did not work straight away (things like the guide button, recorded TV etc). Will go back and play at a later date as I think this is down to me not the product but with the CIR receiver working without effort I will stick with that for a bit.
 

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