Devolo WiFi AC Repeater Review

EndlessWaves

Distinguished Member
Unfortunately, the overall performance was disappointing. Back in Nov 2014 we reviewed Netgear’s £35 WN3000RP which was a basic 300Mbps WiFi repeater and the speeds received then were in some cases better than we received here with the Devolo repeater..
Uh...
Devolo:


Netgear:


You haven't tested them like for like as the Existing Wireless results are different. Either the laptop has changed or the location has changed (different surrounding networks etc.)

As such, saying one is faster than the other is invalid. It's entirely possible that if you tested the netgear under the same circumstances it would be slower than the devolo.
 

Steve Stifler

Well-known Member
Hi Gregg, Paragraph 1, line 4, is that "can't", not "can"?
Nice review thanks
 

Greg Hook

Moderator & Reviewer
Uh...

You haven't tested them like for like as the Existing Wireless results are different. Either the laptop has changed or the location has changed (different surrounding networks etc.)

As such, saying one is faster than the other is invalid. It's entirely possible that if you tested the netgear under the same circumstances it would be slower than the devolo.
Thanks for the comments. It is the same laptop in the same places. I ensure this is done everytime I test to make everything comparable. The testing is all carried out in the same place. The Netgear was tested under the same circumstances as the Devolo. Unfortunately I can't explain why the existing wireless in location 1 was so poor almost two years ago.

Hi Gregg, Paragraph 1, line 4, is that "can't", not "can"?
Nice review thanks
Thanks Steve, I'm at work now so will correct that tonight.
 

MacrosTheBlack

Well-known Member
Nice review. But wireless repeaters are, from my experience, extremely flaky in there primary goal of extending a wifi signal. Which again seems the case here.
6/10 for pretty much failing at its primary purpose seems overly generous to me.
 

Greg Hook

Moderator & Reviewer
Nice review. But wireless repeaters are, from my experience, extremely flaky in there primary goal of extending a wifi signal. Which again seems the case here.
6/10 for pretty much failing at its primary purpose seems overly generous to me.
Thanks, remember the rating is just my personal opinion. I thought 6/10 was fair in that it did extend the wireless to areas I couldn't normally get a signal, but yet the speeds were not fantastic. So it didn't fail on its primary purpose of extending WiFi, it just didn't do a great job of doing so.

But yes, wireless repeaters are very temperamental. If you want a steady, fast and solid signal then something like a powerline adapter might be a better option.
 

Chester

Well-known Member
Hey @Greg Hook, glad the review revealed the truth of the matter with these repeaters: they can get you out of trouble in some very low bandwidth usage cases, but can't be considered for any serious applications.

Have you ever tried Draytek hardware or attempted to get some in for review? I know their wireless controller is built into the Vigor 2860 but I'm not sure if the 27xx routers can be used in extended WiFi networks or meshes. Haven't played with the lower-end stuff as I mainly use Draytek devices for business. I'm happy to check out the manuals and make sure that they've got the right capabilities for anyone that's interested.
 

mrmrh

Active Member
Although it's a much more expensive option I'd love to see a review of AmpliFi when it comes out.
I keep hearing great things about the parent company Ubiquiti Networks and they setup AmpliFi Labs for products for the home.
 

Chester

Well-known Member
Sounds like one to watch out for. I've deployed a few WiFi networks using Ubiquiti products now and I use a UniFi AP myself, although those installs were based on CAT5e infrastructure to each AP which will always provide the best solution.

I must have got the AmplifFi marketing email 3 or 4 months ago. It's still not going to perform miracles, but I would still expect this to be a cut above the rest of similar solutions out there.
 

Greg Hook

Moderator & Reviewer
Hey @Greg Hook, glad the review revealed the truth of the matter with these repeaters: they can get you out of trouble in some very low bandwidth usage cases, but can't be considered for any serious applications.

Have you ever tried Draytek hardware or attempted to get some in for review? I know their wireless controller is built into the Vigor 2860 but I'm not sure if the 27xx routers can be used in extended WiFi networks or meshes. Haven't played with the lower-end stuff as I mainly use Draytek devices for business. I'm happy to check out the manuals and make sure that they've got the right capabilities for anyone that's interested.
Thanks Chester you are about spot on with your conclusion of repeaters and glad you garnered that from my review. I've not had any contact with any PR companies for Draytek but will mention it to the higher ups to see what we can do.
 

mickevh

Distinguished Member
Although it's a much more expensive option I'd love to see a review of AmpliFi when it comes out.
I keep hearing great things about the parent company Ubiquiti Networks and they setup AmpliFi Labs for products for the home.
I wouldn't get too excited about it. The Wi-Fi (and radio) fundamentals are the same for everyone, no matter what marketing BS they wrap around it. Until MU-MIMO gets going, it's still the case that in any given radio channel "only one thing at a time can transmit."

So called "mesh" networks are nothing new, they've been around for 10 years or so to my knowledge in other products. I've had some that offered the idea that in a dual band AP, one waveband - 2.4GHz at the time as that was what most client devices used - would be used for client device communications - "AP" mode - and the 5GHz waveband would be used for the "backhaul" ("mesh") link to other AP's. (And/or Vice versa.) It was effective at the time when there was less 5GHz usage, but as more and more 5GHz devices are around and the numbers are growing (e.g. AC only works in 5GHz) it's going to be a less effective strategy.

Where I think there are some "interesting" developments in mesh networking is AP's that are "tripple band," ie there's three radio chains in the AP - one serving 2.4GHz and two serving 5GHz thereby allowing both (simultaneously) an "AP" serving 5Ghz channel and a "backhaul/mesh" serving 5Ghz channel on differing radio channels. 5GHz has many more discreet radio channels than 2.4Ghz, though as AC develops that's going to become exhausted - AC uses a similar "channel bonding" trick that N does to achieve throughput (speed) gains. G/A used (only) "thin" 20MHz channels, N used (both) 20Mhz and (optionally) 40MHz channels, AC extends that paradigm further and can use 20MHz and (optionally) 40MHz, 80MHz and 160MHz channels (though not much is doing 160MHz at present.)

We await the the future with interest.
 
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Chester

Well-known Member
Yeah, OK, but that's more for commercial workloads. If a solution like AmpliFi can get 10-20Mb/s to a client the other side of an extender/repeater, that's better than 1-4! Unless you've got a large or extended family at home each hammering WiFi at the same time?

Don't get me started on contention with other 2.4GHz devices and neighbours! Very few people have a greenfield network.
 

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