Desktop randomly shuts down

WattsX99

Active Member
And i'm not entirely sure why, or even how to diagnose it.

My desktop has a variety of components :). I'm a "light" user in the sense that I don't use it as a gaming PC, more a day to day thing for web browsing, music, video and the odd random game here and there.

ASRock A320M-S2H V2-CF Motherboard
Ryzen 5 Mobile 3400G CPU
32GB of DDR4 Ram (933 mhz (i think))
Radeon RX Vega 11 On-Board GFX
Gamemax Iceberg 120mm Water Cooling
Adata XPG SX8200 Pro 1TB M.2 SSD (Boot Drive)
Samsung 870 QVO 2TB SSD (Everything else)
700w 80+ Gold PSU

I can be online and listening to music and everything will suddenly sound like it's being dragged through treacle for a few seconds. Even the music i'm listening to slows right down but then it corrects itself again.

Earlier on, all I had running was WinAmp and Opera with a couple of windows open and everything had slowed right down. The mouse was very sluggish as well and a few seconds later it just blinked off and shut down, so it's not like I was putting it under any huge stress.

It's under a desk in my living room and has a decent amount of ventilation. It's not a virus or malware issue as I'm pretty well protected in that respect.

The only thing I can think of to do at the moment is to maybe clean the CPU and re-apply some thermal paste in case it actually is overheating and cutting out.

But is there any kind of background utility I can run that could potentially capture what's happening to give me any kind of idea why it's doing this ?

 
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Bolosun

Member
I would make sure all of the fans are clear and working properly. Then try reseating everything. Have run a temp monitor to see if the temp increases before it starts slowing down?
 

WattsX99

Active Member
I would make sure all of the fans are clear and working properly. Then try reseating everything. Have run a temp monitor to see if the temp increases before it starts slowing down?
The fans are certainly clear and working, and I do regularly use compressed air to give the case a good clean on a regular basis as well.

I did run a temperature monitor a few weeks back funnily enough and that didn't provide any clues as it didn't seem to be under any undue stress either, although ideally I'd still prefer it to be able to capture a log of the temperatures when the thing shuts down.

I think i'm definitely going to reseat the CPU at the very least and see if that makes a difference.
 

Missyeight

Active Member
But is there any kind of background utility I can run that could potentially capture what's happening to give me any kind of idea why it's doing this ?
You can download Speccy (free version) to see what the temps are, it is very low on resources and has other info about your PC.
 

WattsX99

Active Member
You can download Speccy (free version) to see what the temps are, it is very low on resources and has other info about your PC.
Being a former owner of a ZX Spectrum in my youth, I got quite excited there :)

I've downloaded it so I'll give it a look later, thankyou.
 

WattsX99

Active Member
Well I've just cleaned and re-seated the CPU. I also replaced the CMOS battery with a brand new one, even though I think that was ok.

I even took the plunge and also replaced the PSU, which I appreciate is a bit extreme !

The reasoning behind it was that my old one was a generic non-modular 700w one, so I had a ton of unused connector cables stuffed in and around the back of the case.

I figured that if I got a modular one and just used the cables I needed that it might increase the airflow a little bit so I went with a decent 80+ gold 750w from Corsair and fitted that as well.

It didn't blow up on first boot so that's always a good start ..
 

JollyJamma

Active Member
I even took the plunge and also replaced the PSU, which I appreciate is a bit extreme !

The reasoning behind it was that my old one was a generic non-modular 700w one, so I had a ton of unused connector cables stuffed in and around the back of the case.
.
No, replacing the PSU was probably it. Never use a generic PSU.

It almost certainly was overloaded and you could have popped your system using it. Even though it said 700 watts, it was probably only able to supply 450 watts or so. 700 is its peak demand capacity for one or two seconds.

Friends don't let friends use bad power supplies.
 

WattsX99

Active Member
No, replacing the PSU was probably it. Never use a generic PSU.

It almost certainly was overloaded and you could have popped your system using it. Even though it said 700 watts, it was probably only able to supply 450 watts or so. 700 is its peak demand capacity for one or two seconds.

Friends don't let friends use bad power supplies.
I like the last line :)

I've got a feeling something might have gone awry though as the CPU temperature seems to have jumped in the few hours since I installed everything. It was averaging around 51 degrees earlier and now it's 61 and a few minutes ago when i turned it on, it jumped to 80 ..

Although I do wonder if it's because I was trying to use Bluestacks earlier on and it wanted me to enable Hyper Threading Virtualisation.

I'm going to disable it and see if it makes a difference.

#edit

No difference. I guess I'll have to pull it apart again tomorrow to see if I need more thermal paste maybe or try and check to see if the water tank is still working on the cooling. Grrrrr.

It's currently hovering around 80 again as well
 
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Missyeight

Active Member
No difference. I guess I'll have to pull it apart again tomorrow to see if I need more thermal paste maybe or try and check to see if the water tank is still working on the cooling. Grrrrr.
.... or maybe less paste ? You may well know already but just in case, you should only spread a very thin layer on the cpu.
 

WattsX99

Active Member
.... or maybe less paste ? You may well know already but just in case, you should only spread a very thin layer on the cpu.
Yeah I only put the proverbial "pea sized" dab in the middle of the CPU yesterday.

It might just be me being overly paranoid. I tend to do that after any hardware upgrades as I usually think i've made it worse :D

At least it's pretty cold in the flat this morning as I write this and the CPU is sitting at a "nice" 50 degrees !
 

Missyeight

Active Member
To me that would seem hot if at idle but I suppose it is like comparing chalk and cheese. With just this page open and the computer having being on for a couple of hours I'm running just less than 30°C on an old i5 4570 with stock cpu fan and one case fan.

CPU.png
 

77red96

Active Member
I might have an idea of what is happening. A lot of the gamemax coolers have a bit of air trapped in them, if you have the cooler rad mounted with the pipes at the top you are probably pumping air around to try and cool the cpu rather than coolant.
 

WattsX99

Active Member
To me that would seem hot if at idle but I suppose it is like comparing chalk and cheese. With just this page open and the computer having being on for a couple of hours I'm running just less than 30°C on an old i5 4570 with stock cpu fan and one case fan.

View attachment 1630956
This is the inside of the desktop now I've replaced the PSU ..

IMG_0952.jpg


The circled part is what I'm concerned about as the main motherboard power supply is actually touching the two pipes from the water cooling and I'm finding it difficult to separate them.

I'm wondering if this is what is causing the spikes in the CPU temperature ?
 

77red96

Active Member
This is the inside of the desktop now I've replaced the PSU ..

View attachment 1632004

The circled part is what I'm concerned about as the main motherboard power supply is actually touching the two pipes from the water cooling and I'm finding it difficult to separate them.

I'm wondering if this is what is causing the spikes in the CPU temperature ?

As I suspected the radiator is mounted upside down. Pipes at the highest point in the system, therefore air is being pumped round not coolant. Just undo the 4 screws at the back of the case and flip the rad so the pipes are at the bottom. This is 100% what is causing you to have high temps.

Please excuse the crudeness of my image, but the pipes in the blue circle, the whole assembly needs to be rotated through 180 degrees to be in the green area.

Also the 24pin motherboard cable can be fed through the middle of the three cable run points to the right of the motherboard, I'm not even sure why it's been fed over the top.
 

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77red96

Active Member
Because i'm clearly a moron 🤣

Now you've pointed it out, It makes perfect sense !. Thankyou for the pointers though, I'll get in to that and see how it goes.
🤣🤣👍 I promise you the cpu temps are coming from that rad being upside down. I'll eat my hat if I'm wrong.
 

WattsX99

Active Member
See there's me getting all chuffed at the quick turnaround of flipping the radiator to get this, with the main motherboard power suppled now well and truly out of the way, but ..

IMG_0955.jpg


.. i'm starting to wonder if I shouldn't have actually flipped the CPU cooler ?. The CPU temperature at the moment is sitting at 54 degrees, albeit it's a solid 54 degrees and isn't moving at all.

There's not a huge amount of wiggle room inside the case and it seemed the best option, although I'm thinking I might try and turn it back round again, obviously leaving the radiator where it is.
 

77red96

Active Member
I probably would have only flipped the rad, tbh I'd expect your temps to be on the high side at idle as you dont have great airflow in that case, somewhere around the 40 degrees but 52 is way too high.

What paste are you using? Also I've heard people say a pea sized amount, that's probably not enough for a ryzen cpu, try 2 peas. I usually draw a little x inside a box on my ryzen cpu's before fitting a cooler... which without a picture is probably of zero use to you.

If it helps I've over 20 years experience in this field and I've built over 100 machines this year. It used to be my job but now it's a hobby, I just get a lot of local people asking me to still build machines.
 

77red96

Active Member
Ahhh, I've just seen another issue...
You have your pump plugged into a system fan header not the cpu fan header!
 

77red96

Active Member
The pump needs to be plugged into the grey cpu fan header located in the area of the blue circle in this image
 

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WattsX99

Active Member
So, in a nutshell, I had the bloody thing upside down, back to front and plugged in arse about face. That about sum it up ? 😂😂

I think i've properly cracked it though, even though my neighbour downstairs is currently probably thinking of ways to murder me for doing PC Maintenance at 11:45pm at night ..

IMG_0958.jpg


Two air pipes are much neater and spaced out and the pump is now plugged into the CPU fan header (the angle of the picture is slightly misleading as the lead is actually nowhere near the fan).

As I sit here and type this, the CPU is sitting at 24 degrees. Over HALF of what it was just after 8pm this evening.

I honestly can't thank you enough :)
 

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