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Dentists - Private vs NHS

iandmcneill

Standard Member
Hi Folks,

Has anyone got experience of having their dentistry taken care of by a NHS practice and then moving to a private practice? What does the extra money pay for - is it merely a more available service (e.g. shorter waiting time for appointments). Is it better trained staff, better equipment and materials, more up to date techniques (e.g. quicker, less pain)?

Ta,
Ian
 

loz

Distinguished Member
Hi Folks,

Has anyone got experience of having their dentistry taken care of by a NHS practice and then moving to a private practice? What does the extra money pay for - is it merely a more available service (e.g. shorter waiting time for appointments). Is it better trained staff, better equipment and materials, more up to date techniques (e.g. quicker, less pain)?

I did the opposite.

Only difference I have noticed is a much reduced cost. :thumbsup:
 
I went from private practice to NHS practice and do notice the difference. I also did notice the difference with NHS and NHS. Its hit and miss these days :suicide:
 

Lee

Moderator
I also found there to be no difference between them except for cost.
 

Singh400

Distinguished Member
Before you go down that route. Ring your local PCT, and ask for the Public Heath department. Ask to see if they have a program where they are referring patients to different practices to get work done more quickly.

Not saying they will for sure, but it's woth a shot. My PCT does :smashin:
 

BandWidthJunkie

Well-known Member
Hi Folks,

Has anyone got experience of having their dentistry taken care of by a NHS practice and then moving to a private practice? What does the extra money pay for - is it merely a more available service (e.g. shorter waiting time for appointments). Is it better trained staff, better equipment and materials, more up to date techniques (e.g. quicker, less pain)?

Ta,
Ian

None of the above, it just costs more :mad:

Had to go private when I couldn't find a NHS Dentist in my area and I can honestly say I experienced no difference.
 

supahyp

Active Member
It depends what service you are after . Certain treatments performed by specialists i.e implants are only performed privately by and large . Other treatments like root canal treatments and treatment of chronic gum disease , although available on the NHS , if performed by a specialist , who will of course charge specialist fees , will be in most cases far superior to NHS . The skill of a specialist will far surpass those of a ordinary dentist in a given field as by in large they only limit themselves to that particular area of dentistry .

If you are talking about routine dentistry , in most cases the differences are more difficult to spot . NHS dentistry can be used as a "Trojan horse" where a dental surgery is opened trumpeting " NHS treatment available here " , with the express purpose of getting people through the door , then once a big enough patient list is formed , converting the practice to private " so that the dentists can provide a better quality of treatment that our patients deserve " .

In some cases this means the same dentist with the same skills will be performing the same procedures using the same equipment . The only difference a patient may notice will probably be a smart looking coffee machine in a far less busy waiting room.

There are some dental surgeries that are opened with the express purpose of being private from the get go , but these are normally specialist led , with more flexible working hours .

So to answer your question , there can be a difference between private and NHS dentists , but it really depends what situation you are in . If you have normal healthy teeth , than the differences will be minor . If however you are unfortunate enough to have advanced dental problems then treatment by a specialist will be your best course of action .
 

la gran siete

Distinguished Member
I had all my fillings changed to composite some years ago by my dentist who at that time took both NHS and private.The fillings had to be undertaken privately as they are not funded by the NHS .Itwas probably the stupidiest thing I have ever done bewcause not only did it cost me a small fortune but didnt show any appreciable benefits.As normal amalgam fillings contain mercury I had this idea it could affect my health.Now I am more or less tied to private dentistry:rolleyes:which IS a rip off.Root canal filling plus crown £680 , Crown £400 hygienist £50.Sometimes I wonder whether one or two of those crowns were necessary.I felt no pain at the time, so why not just drill out the cavity and refill?My dentist competent ,as she maybe ,always seems very keen to sell me some treatment or other.
Time all dentists were nationalised
 

oakie

Active Member
Im with NHS, my mother who goes to the exact same dentist is private - so the only difference is she pays more.

My last appointment i was given the option for root canal or extraction free of charge (went for extraction) i dont know why it was free as i work don't claim any benefits, not an oap or asylum seeker etc?
 

supahyp

Active Member
Unfortunately the only benefit composite fillings have is that they stick to the tooth which can be useful if there is no retention for amalgam and there is no space for a pin , and that they look better .

Other than that there is absolutely no proven health benefit for the vast majority of patients for composite fillings . Indeed they are made from various compounds chock full of potentially free radical inducing chemicals , so who knows what problems they will be associated with in the future .

On top of that they are incredibly technique sensitive in their placement , can shrink , and have a much shorter life expectancy than amalgam fillings . This could explain why so many of them eventually need crowning.

Private dental treatment shows it biggest benefit in the provision of things like dentures which are as a rule far superior to their NHS equivalents , but that has little to do with the dentist , more due to the quality of the laboratory they are sent to .
 
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la gran siete

Distinguished Member
Unfortunately the only benefit composite fillings have is that they stick to the tooth which can be useful if there is no retention for amalgam and there is no space for a pin , and that they look better .

Other than that there is absolutely no proven health benefit for the vast majority of patients for composite fillings . Indeed they are made from various chemicals chock full of potentially free radical inducing chemicals , so who knows what problems will they be associated with in the future .

On top of that they are incredibly technique sensitive in their placement , can shrink , and have a much shorter life expectancey than amalgam fillings . This could explain why so many of them eventually need crowning.

.
Thanks for telling me that .Just what i needed to learn :rolleyes:Maybe I should go back and have them all changed to amalgam again:rolleyes:or spend the rest of my days consuming large quantities of antioxidents
 
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krish

Distinguished Member
my local private dentist (just 4 min walk from my house) is cheaper for check ups than NHS .. £15 rather than £16.20 unless x rays are taken; its also a more hi tech practice

they've also been cheaper with hygienist appointments than the private charge I've found at local NHS practices - just £40, when other NHS practices are privately charging £48+
 

supahyp

Active Member
Thanks for telling me that .Just what i needed to learn :rolleyes:Maybe I should go back and have them all changed to amalgam again:rolleyes:or spend the rest of my days consuming large quantities of antioxidents

Gold is the answer , amazingly biocompatible , stable , attractive (to some !) and if you ever have to lose the tooth you will get some money back by selling it as scrap ! Seriously a well done gold inlay will outlast any other tooth restoration .
 

la gran siete

Distinguished Member
Gold is the answer , amazingly biocompatible , stable , attractive (to some !) and if you ever have to lose the tooth you will get some money back by selling it as scrap ! Seriously a well done gold inlay will outlast any other tooth restoration .

I am sure:) so I can multiply £650 by ,say, 4 or 5 for cost?
 

supahyp

Active Member
I am sure:) so I can multiply £650 by ,say, 4 or 5 for cost?


Not unless your dentists name is Dick Turpin ! Gold inlays require less preparation than crowns , so if anything you should pay less . They are however somewhat of a lost art , so if your dentist quotes you a high figure for one , its probably because they are trying to get you to have something they are more comfortable doing .

Don't get me wrong I'm not saying gold inlays will never fail , but done in the right instances (a heavily built up non root filled tooth ) , by a experienced dentist they are excellent long lasting restorations which have the benefit of being conservative of tooth structure .

The best dental advice I have been given is firstly that if you doubt the benefits of flossing , to floss three teeth then smell the floss (!) and secondly that anything I had done in my mouth would fail at some point so where ever possible always to opt for the most conservative option.
 

la gran siete

Distinguished Member
Not unless your dentists name is Dick Turpin ! Gold inlays require less preparation than crowns , so if anything you should pay less . They are however somewhat of a lost art , so if your dentist quotes you a high figure for one , its probably because they are trying to get you to have something they are more comfortable doing .

Don't get me wrong I'm not saying gold inlays will never fail , but done in the right instances (a heavily built up non root filled tooth ) , by a experienced dentist they are excellent long lasting restorations which have the benefit of being conservative of tooth structure .

The best dental advice I have been given is firstly that if you doubt the benefits of flossing , to floss three teeth then smell the floss (!) and secondly that anything I had done in my mouth would fail at some point so where ever possible always to opt for the most conservative option.

so floss and gold where possible but not root filled teeth.
I use to know a bloke who would always make `a point of flashing his gold fillings and caps by opening his mouth wide when he spoke,then we could get a good idea he was worth a few bob.Kind of put me off the idea of having mine done so i went composite,but it was mainly some sites which mentioned the perils of mercury vapour getting into the blood system that made me go for the change, plus the fact my dentist didnt exactly discourage me.
 
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supahyp

Active Member
so floss and gold where possible but not root filled teeth.
I use to know a bloke who would always make `a point of flashing his gold fillings and caps by opening his mouth wide when he spoke,then we could get a good idea he was worth a few bob.Kind of put me off the idea of having mine done so i went composite,but it was mainly some sites which mentioned the perils of mercury vapour getting into the blood system that made me go for the change, plus the fact my dentist didnt exactly discourage me.


Also if you chip or crack a tooth that is not root filled , be wary of having it crowned . If the tooth is root filled get it crowned as there is a risk that the tooth will split , but if its still alive there is a 50% chance that by crowning it you will need to have a root canal within five years . That may mean having to pay for a root canal treatment and a new crown if the dentist is unable to locate the root canals through the existing crown .

With fillings it is the law of diminishing returns , a filling starts off a certain size , then gets bigger and bigger .Sometimes this due to wear and tear , sometimes due to recurrent decay. If a filling is worn but not decayed , don't bother changing it as you can bet your boots that the new filling will be bigger and deeper and sure as hell won't last as long .

It sounds like you have had a fair amount of dental treatment . I would suggest that when you see your dentist you should find out why you've had to have all the crowns and all .

Is it due to decay on previously unfilled teeth , in which case you need to analyse your diet . If its due to decay on previously filled teeth ,was it because the fillings had shrunk ? Finally if the teeth are breaking because you are grinding your teeth , something which seems to be epidemic in these stressed times you may need to wear a mouthguard at night .

X -rays are vital for monitoring dental disease . The best ones are small bitewing intraoral films as these can often catch decay in a very early stage .Insist on these at least once a year . The radiation dose is minimal .

Don't have a panoral xray ,unless it is needed to look at roots of wisdom teeth or locate buried teeth , diagnose cysts , or as a precursor to implant or orthodontic work . They are useful in these cases , but give (in relation to bitewing xrays ) a massive dose of radiation with next to useless caries detection .

The main thing with dentistry is really to avoid it where possible ! Unfortunately if you have clinical disease it is best to treat it ASAP , but to treat any tooth because it seems like it "might go " is folly . If there is decay ,which unfortunately occurs 90% of the time without pain get it treated . It should almost always be demonstratable on a xray.

Don't bother changing any of your composite filllings if they are sound and if you are going to have antioxidants go with eating raw broccolli or cauliflower as fruit juice is not at all good for teeth !
 
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