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Denon x3300 vs Sony dn1080

GadgetObsessed

Well-known Member
I am looking for a new receiver and am considering the Denon X3300 and the Sony DN1080.
(Also considering the X2300 as there dont appear to be many advantages of the X3300 for me - other than I would get the OSD when watching a 4k source. Not sure how much better the XT32 room calibration is over the standard XT?)

I have a Denon X2100 in another room and I am very happy with that so my natural instinct is to go with the Denon. However, I already have a Sony 65" TV and a Sony UHD bluray player - so a Sony receiver would be an option.

As I understand it both the Denon and Sony should get a Dolby Vision update at some time in the future. Although Denon seem to be clearer about that than Sony. That is important to me as my Sony TV (65ZD9) will get a DV update some time.

Any suggestions?
 

ashenfie

Well-known Member
Denon offer great value for money and it's hard to ignore them, if you're already happy with your existing Denon, then Denon is the way forward.
 

Zerouali

Standard Member
Depends, unless the Denon sounds markedly better than the doubt (which I doubt it will) there's a lot to be set for keeping the SONY theme going.

In my experience of SONY kit once you link it up it all just works, no handshake/hdmi/cec etc. issues, it all works together beautifully.

I think a demo if you can just in case one jumps out at you, but I'm assuming they'll be pretty even which makes the SONY/Bravia sync option the clincher for me.
 

GadgetObsessed

Well-known Member
I have had a few Yamaha receivers, including the more highly specified A1020 and while I have liked them and the build quality is great, I prefer the sound of the Denon x2200.

As I have two rooms with TV/audio setups, having receivers with similar interfaces in each room will be easier for the rest of the family to understand - even if it makes little difference to me.

The only reason to consider the Sony is to match with the TV and UHD player. However, the DN1080 is newly released and close to its launch price. So it doesn't seem great value for money at £545, which is £65 more than the X3300 that was £800 at launch.

Sony receivers don't seem to get much coverage on these forums so it is difficult to get a feel for real user experience. Sony's room correction does not seem to be very well regarded.

Dont suppose anyone here has tried both a dn1080 or a Denon X3300?
 

logiclee

Well-known Member
I'd go with the X3300 purely for the Audyssey XT32 room correction.

And although you may have Sony TV and Sony UHD Bluray if you want DV there is no guarantee that the Sony X800 bluray will be upgraded to support that so you may end up swapping that to get DV.

Lee
 

GadgetObsessed

Well-known Member
I'd go with the X3300 purely for the Audyssey XT32 room correction.

And although you may have Sony TV and Sony UHD Bluray if you want DV there is no guarantee that the Sony X800 bluray will be upgraded to support that so you may end up swapping that to get DV.

Lee
Yes - the DV update on the x800 doesn't look likely.
 

adepoyu

Novice Member
Dont suppose anyone here has tried both a dn1080 or a Denon X3300?

Well, in a couple of days I will receive both. I liked the Sony in the first place, but I own a 7.1 4-Ohm speaker set and I'm afraid I will have to keep the Denon since the Sony will only drive 6-Ohm speakers. I will test both anyway, but unless I see no low volume, overheating, cutovers or any other side effects for the 4-Ohm speakers AND, I'm absolutely blown away by the Sony besting the Denon, I guess I'll be a happy Denon 3300 owner and return the Sony.
 

GadgetObsessed

Well-known Member
Well, in a couple of days I will receive both. I liked the Sony in the first place, but I own a 7.1 4-Ohm speaker set and I'm afraid I will have to keep the Denon since the Sony will only drive 6-Ohm speakers. I will test both anyway, but unless I see no low volume, overheating, cutovers or any other side effects for the 4-Ohm speakers AND, I'm absolutely blown away by the Sony besting the Denon, I guess I'll be a happy Denon 3300 owner and return the Sony.
Do you have the Denon already but not really like it so are trying the Sony?
 

GadgetObsessed

Well-known Member
One feature I really like with Denon/Audyssey is the enhancements provided for lower volume listening for movies. I generally use Dynamic EQ together with Dynamic Volume set to Light. (I find that Medium can sometimes compress the dynamic range too much.)

Looking at the Sony manual on-line the equivalent I can see "Sound Optimiser":
STR-DN1080 | Help Guide | Enjoying clear and dynamic sound at a low volume (Sound Optimizer)

It has a Low and Normal setting but I am not sure why it describes low as being for CD rather than Movies??
  • Normal: Adjusts for the reference level of a movie.
  • Low: Adjusts for a CD or other software whose average sound pressure level is processed highly.
The Sony also lacks a front HDMI port - something that I use quite alot when connecting devices temporarily to my TV e.g. a laptop.
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
One feature I really like with Denon/Audyssey is the enhancements provided for lower volume listening for movies. I generally use Dynamic EQ together with Dynamic Volume set to Light. (I find that Medium can sometimes compress the dynamic range too much.)

Looking at the Sony manual on-line the equivalent I can see "Sound Optimiser":
STR-DN1080 | Help Guide | Enjoying clear and dynamic sound at a low volume (Sound Optimizer)

It has a Low and Normal setting but I am not sure why it describes low as being for CD rather than Movies??
  • Normal: Adjusts for the reference level of a movie.
  • Low: Adjusts for a CD or other software whose average sound pressure level is processed highly.
The Sony also lacks a front HDMI port - something that I use quite alot when connecting devices temporarily to my TV e.g. a laptop.


The film industry has a standard for reference levels and a fixed level while the music industry doesn't. The dynamic range associated with fil soundtracks will not be the same as that associated with stereo music recordings.

The Sony has a feature similar to Audyssey Dynamic Volume called Advanced Volume Functio which is intended to reducesudden soft-to-loud volume shifts from TV commercials and standard Dolby and DTS encoded movies. The Audyssey system works with all soundtracks, including Dolby TrueHD, DTS HD, and Master Audio-encoded Blu-rays, but Sony's Advanced Volume Function is not applicable to Dolby TrueHD or DTS-HD Master Audio encoded audio.
 
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GadgetObsessed

Well-known Member
The film industry has a standard for reference levels and a fixed level while the music industry doesn't. The dynamic range associated with fil soundtracks will not be the same as that associated with stereo music recordings.
Thanks for that Dante.

Does that mean that using Sony's Sound Optimiser at a Low setting for movies won't simply be like a weaker (as in less compression) version of the "Normal" setting.

I really like how Denon allow me to determine how much DRC is applied with 4 levels of compression - Off, Low, Medium and High.
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
Thanks for that Dante.

Does that mean that using Sony's Sound Optimiser at a Low setting for movies won't simply be like a weaker (as in less compression) version of the "Normal" setting.

I really like how Denon allow me to determine how much DRC is applied with 4 levels of compression - Off, Low, Medium and High.

A don't believe tthat the Optimiser has anything to do with dynamic range compression? AS I said, the Sony has a feature similar to Audyssey's Dynamic Volume called the Advanced Volume Function, but you cannot use this in conjunction with TRueHD or DTS-HD Master Audio encoded audio.
 

GadgetObsessed

Well-known Member
A don't believe tthat the Optimiser has anything to do with dynamic range compression? AS I said, the Sony has a feature similar to Audyssey's Dynamic Volume called the Advanced Volume Function, but you cannot use this in conjunction with TRueHD or DTS-HD Master Audio encoded audio.
I was assuming that Sony's sound did something like DRC as it is described as:
Enjoying clear and dynamic sound at a low volume (Sound Optimizer)
I suppose it could be more like Audyssey's Dynamic Equalizer, if the Advanced Volume function is he equivalent of Dynamic Volume.

BTW - I cannot find any mention of Advanced Volume within the DN1080's on-line manual - although DRC is mentioned here:STR-DN1080 | Help Guide | Compressing the dynamic range (Dynamic Range Compressor)
 
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dante01

Distinguished Member
It should be noted that Audyssey's Dynamic Volume isn't strictly speaking dynamic range compression. DRC is actually a standard as far as film soundtracks are concerned and can be applied to Dolby encoded audio by the source or the AV receiver. The audio is mixed including data relating to the dynamic range which is iterpretted by the device playing and or decoding it. DRC is something not quite the same as Audyssey Dynamic Volume and referes to a specific type of compression when referring to film soundtracks. The standardised form of DRC isn't variable though and is applied at a constant rate irrespective of the master volume if turned on.
 

GadgetObsessed

Well-known Member
It should be noted that Audyssey's Dynamic Volume isn't strictly speaking dynamic range compression. DRC is actually a standard as far as film soundtracks are concerned and can be applied to Dolby encoded audio by the source or the AV receiver. The audio is mixed including data relating to the dynamic range which is iterpretted by the device playing and or decoding it. DRC is something not quite the same as Audyssey Dynamic Volume and referes to a specific type of compression when referring to film soundtracks. The standardised form of DRC isn't variable though and is applied at a constant rate irrespective of the master volume if turned on.
It looks as though the Sony supports "true DRC" as described above, through its DRC setting.

So the question for me is whether the Sony has something similar to Dynamic Volume that will apply to all TV and not just to Dolby encoded audio?

One final question on the Sony - can I view its OSD when watching a 4k source? (I cannot on my Denon x2200 but should be able to on the X3300.)
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
It looks as though the Sony supports "true DRC" as described above, through its DRC setting.

So the question for me is whether the Sony has something similar to Dynamic Volume that will apply to all TV and not just to Dolby encoded audio?

One final question on the Sony - can I view its OSD when watching a 4k source? (I cannot on my Denon x2200 but should be able to on the X3300.)


As said, that would be the Advanced Volume Function:


The Sony has a feature similar to Audyssey Dynamic Volume called Advanced Volume Function which is intended to reducesudden soft-to-loud volume shifts from TV commercials and standard Dolby and DTS encoded movies. The Audyssey system works with all soundtracks, including Dolby TrueHD, DTS HD, and Master Audio-encoded Blu-rays, but Sony's Advanced Volume Function is not applicable to Dolby TrueHD or DTS-HD Master Audio encoded audio.
 

GadgetObsessed

Well-known Member
As said, that would be the Advanced Volume Function:


The Sony has a feature similar to Audyssey Dynamic Volume called Advanced Volume Function which is intended to reducesudden soft-to-loud volume shifts from TV commercials and standard Dolby and DTS encoded movies. The Audyssey system works with all soundtracks, including Dolby TrueHD, DTS HD, and Master Audio-encoded Blu-rays, but Sony's Advanced Volume Function is not applicable to Dolby TrueHD or DTS-HD Master Audio encoded audio.

Sorry to repeat this but I cannot see any reference to Advanced Volume in the on-line manual for the DN1080. I can see this referred to in user guides for older Sony models such as the DN1070, DN1060 and DN1050:

STR-DN1070 | Help Guide | Adjusting the volume automatically (Advanced Auto Volume)
Help Guide | Adjusting the volume automatically (Advanced Auto Volume)
Help Guide | Adjusting the volume automatically (Advanced Auto Volume)

So I am left wondering if the DN1080 does not have such an option or if Sony now call it something else.

And can the Sony overlay its menu on 4k content?
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
Sorry to repeat this but I cannot see any reference to Advanced Volume in the on-line manual for the DN1080. I can see this referred to in user guides for older Sony models such as the DN1070, DN1060 and DN1050:

STR-DN1070 | Help Guide | Adjusting the volume automatically (Advanced Auto Volume)
Help Guide | Adjusting the volume automatically (Advanced Auto Volume)
Help Guide | Adjusting the volume automatically (Advanced Auto Volume)

So I am left wondering if the DN1080 does not have such an option or if Sony now call it something else.

And can the Sony overlay its menu on 4k content?

Maybe the 'Sound Optimiser' is indeed a replacement for the Advanced Volume Function then?
 
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GadgetObsessed

Well-known Member
Can anyone confirm if the Sony can display its OSD when watching 4k content?
 

killie77

Well-known Member
I have a Yamaha 581 bought from Richer Sounds about 3 months ago.
Popped in their this morning and asked if I could part exchange against the Sony 1080.
They agreed as i still have the Box and it's in as new condition. So hopefully picking up the Sony tomorrow.
 

adepoyu

Novice Member
Hi,

Well, here are my impressions with both receivers.

I received the Sony on monday and I've been using it since then. Coming from an old average Pioneer, when I first run the Sony I was totally blown away by its sound quality. The setup is pretty fast and simple and in a few minutes I was enjoying music and movie sound as I hadn't experienced before. The downside... I don't know if it's because of my 4-Ohm speaker set or maybe a not so grilled enclosure, but it gets VERY hot. Power consumption is very good, with 50 Watts when idle, 70-80W when pushing it and 2-3W in stand-by. When Hdmi standby through is enabled, it jumps to 26W, which is not a good sign, and I hope it gets sorted in a future firmware upgrade. But overall, very happy with it, and impressed with sound quality.

Yesterday I received the Denon. The calibration takes much more time but it pays off... Amazing sound quality. I could tell it was better than the Sony, but there were some issues with it:
- First, I was getting strange video quality due to some image processing. I had to spend some time navigating through the menus until I finally found out how to get rid of it, basically choosing game mode over movie disables all of them to get a faster image response.
- It doesn't have Bluetooth emitter, which means I have to pair my bluetooth headphones to each sound source individually instead of doing it just one time for the AV. I could get a separate bluetooth emitter, but it would be nicer having a built in one.
- Power consumption is considerably higher. 70W when idle 80-90W when pushing it. Hdmi standby through is much better, with only 7W.
- It gets hot obviously, but less than the Sony... that's great!

So, when I finally corrected the video processing issue with the Denon, I was sure I would keep this one. But then I tried to calibrate the Sony to try to improve the sound closer to the Denon, because the difference was more obvious only in spatial sound definition. The Denon did a better job with a wider sonic stage and it was much easier to tell where the sound was exactly coming from in any of the ATMOS tests from the Dolby demo disc. What I did was copying the speaker levels from the Denon Audissey calibration to the Sony. I also disabled in the Sony the default AUTO speaker phasing correction, and just like that I had the Sony sound just like the Denon, quite a noticeably jump in quality...

So now, I'm totally confused and don't know which one to keep. As I said, I liked the Sony in the first place. it's sleek, sound quality is just there with the Denon, it's just been released which I hope means that will still have some room for improvement in upgrades from Sony, and it has Bluetooth emitter. But I don't like it getting too hot. I'm wondering if using 4-Ohm speakers might be too much for it...

In the other hand, the Denon sounds just a liiitle bit better. It consumes more power, yes, but it doesn't get as hot as the Sony, and it's able to drive 4 Ohm speakers. I only have one subwoofer, but it also has the ability to drive two. So basically, there's a feeling of a more robust and superior amplifier, but I'm missing that Bluetooth emitter...

I spent all the afternoon/evening comparing both of them and today I will be back for some more. I like the Sony, but I'm starting to turn to the Denon now...
 

Canary Richard

Standard Member

killie77

Well-known Member
Hi
Bought the1080 last Saturday not had much time to play with it. But when i use the setup mic it seems to want to put all speakers as large ?
Another thing i'm trying to work out is I have a Sony Bravia TV which i was hoping would switch on when I switch on the receiver. Its not happening.. But if i switch the TV off it switches the receiver off. Other than that still trying to set it up for the best surround. The Yamaha that i replaced with the Sony seemed easier to use with the Yamaha App. Still looking for a Sony app for iOS
Thanks
Ian
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
Hi
Bought the1080 last Saturday not had much time to play with it. But when i use the setup mic it seems to want to put all speakers as large ?
Another thing i'm trying to work out is I have a Sony Bravia TV which i was hoping would switch on when I switch on the receiver. Its not happening.. But if i switch the TV off it switches the receiver off. Other than that still trying to set it up for the best surround. The Yamaha that i replaced with the Sony seemed easier to use with the Yamaha App. Still looking for a Sony app for iOS
Thanks
Ian

All receivers simply measure the roll off to determine whether they set speakers as being either small or large. THe setting doesn't really have anything at all to do with physical size and is simply an indication of that speakers ability to handle or portray lower frequencies. REgardless of the setting the receiver arrives at, it is suggested you always set speakers as being SMALL post calibration and configure the bass management and crossover settings manually. It is worth noting though that you should try not to set any of the crossovers lower than the frequencies the receiver set after measuring roll off of the speakers.
 

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