Denon AVR-1910 B speaker question

Discussion in 'AV Receivers & Amplifiers' started by Jmbb37, Jun 11, 2015.

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  1. Jmbb37

    Jmbb37
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    Hi all,

    Simple question that I'm sure has a simple answer.. Just can't find exactly what I'm looking for with the search function.

    I have a 1910 that I've had since 2009. It has served me well in general. I typically only have R & L plus a sub since my living room can't really accommodate more speakers. I noticed around this time last year that, with the R & L hooked up to the A speaker outputs, I was getting much more sound out of one of my speakers. I unplugged them and switched to confirm that it was the output and not the speakers.

    So, I hooked them both up to the B speaker outputs, and since then everything has been great. Does anyone have an explanation for this? And further, do the A and B speakers operate off different amps, and by running through just the B speakers, do I risk damaging the receiver in any way? Could the same thing happen to the B speaker outputs theoretically?

    Just curious. Like I said everything has been good since switching outputs but I'm wondering if this has happened to anyone else.

    Thank you in advance!

    Jake
     
  2. PSM1

    PSM1
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    I thought the B speakers were run from the same amps as the A speakers and all it does is effectively run the 2 sets of speakers in parallel with each other.
    How did you unplug them and switch to confirm the issue? Did you just switch the speakers around or did you undo and redo all connections at both the amp and speaker?
     
  3. Jmbb37

    Jmbb37
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    Hi PSM1, thanks for replying.

    Re: amp assignments, I guess that's what I'm trying to figure out. My assumption was also that they ran from the same amp, but that doesn't really explain why one channel sounded so much weaker than the other, and then they sounded fine when switched to B.

    It was a while ago, but I believe I just switched the speakers around, leaving the connections intact. I figured if it was the speaker wire, I would have noticed a problem even after switching to B ports. So maybe it's the connection itself?

    If you have any other suggestions as far as testing, please let me know, I'd be glad to look into it. The receiver has never been driven very hard, there's really no reason for it to be acting up, which is what's got me curious.

    Thanks again!
     
  4. dante01

    dante01
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    The connections or switch associated with the A speaker terminals may have deteriorated or become compromised over time? The Front L & R speakers will only ever use the same onboard amplifiers and amplification stages irrespective of the terminals you use for them. It isn't an issue with the amps, but more likely one relation to the A speaker terminals or the A/B switch.
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2015
  5. Jmbb37

    Jmbb37
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    Dante, thanks very much, that makes sense and makes me feel a little bit better. I'm relieved to know it isn't a problem with the amp.

    Is there anything that can be done outside of a shop to remedy a problem with worn/compromised terminals? Could old wiring in fact be posing a problem? Should I try a different type of connection?
     
  6. dante01

    dante01
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    It can only really be rectified by repair. I can't comment on what the issue is exactly so cannot comment on what would be involved to repair the unit. I'd suspect degradation of solder associated with the A terminals or its switch to be at the root of the issue?

    There's nothing you can do to rectify the issue yourself and you don't need to do anything to the wires or their terminations. I'd simply continue to use the B terminals as opposed to the A terminals.
     
  7. PSM1

    PSM1
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    I wonder if the cable connection on the back of the amp was the problem. A quick check would be to reconnect the speakers back to the A terminal and see if the problem persists. If it does then it is a problem internal to the amp as Dante has suggested.
     

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