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Decorating question. What type of Gloss?

RicksonGracie1972

Distinguished Member
I’ll be decorating the whole of the downstairs of my house soon and wanted peoples advice on what type of paint they used for their woodwork (Skirting boards, Doors etc)
I will be painting these white and normally I would just go for gloss but I’ve had mixed results with different types of gloss in recent years.
Can anyone recommend a make of gloss that doesn’t yellow and is fairly easy to apply, given my lack of skill in all things DIY. I’ve also heard that Satin Wood is a good alternative to gloss but have no idea what type of finish that would give.
Btw, I would normally sand down all wood work prior to painting so that I get a good key.

Thanks in advance
 

Obi1kenobe

Standard Member
I've used Ronseal Diamond Hard Satinwood on All of our woodwork for the last couple if years. No yellowing so far even under ornaments etc which is normally worst.
 

RicksonGracie1972

Distinguished Member
I've used Ronseal Diamond Hard Satinwood on All of our woodwork for the last couple if years. No yellowing so far even under ornaments etc which is normally worst.

does it have the same sort of finish as Gloss or is it more matt?
 

Thug

Moderator
We used eggshell gloss. Looks better and more modern in my opinion.
 

Wahreo

Distinguished Member
As I type this, I'm doing the glossing on my skirts, Arch and a few doors. Just using Dulux.

No matter what paint you use, it will go yellow eventually.

the important thing with gloss is to apply thinly, don't load up your brush too much, let the paint travel far. do a couple of thin coats if need be. I enjoy doing glossing.

I've done satin in a few rooms too but this time I'm glossing as I have a wipe clean floor so feel that the gloss will stand up better to a mop.
 

RicksonGracie1972

Distinguished Member
As I type this, I'm doing the glossing on my skirts, Arch and a few doors. Just using Dulux.

No matter what paint you use, it will go yellow eventually.

the important thing with gloss is to apply thinly, don't load up your brush too much, let the paint travel far. do a couple of thin coats if need be. I enjoy doing glossing.

I've done satin in a few rooms too but this time I'm glossing as I have a wipe clean floor so feel that the gloss will stand up better to a mop.

I do tend to load up my brush in the hope that one coat will suffice, I guess more patience is needed then
 

Wahreo

Distinguished Member
To give you a idea- New skirting board, primed MDF- One coat looks acceptable but two coats leaves a flawless finish.
 

nheather

Distinguished Member
I have always used Dulux gloss (mostly liquid rather than non-drip).

However, bought a can last year and it visibly yellowed within a couple of months.

There was a consummer programme where a woman got a paint manufacturer to pay for the redcoration of her house after such a problem.

Apparently the paint manufacturers are aware of the problem and are trying to find alternative additives to resolve.

It all stems from an EU directive a few years back which restricted the amount of certain chemicals that could be included - including the one that prevents yellowing.

Acrylic (water based) paints don't suffer from this problem, but my experience is that

(i) They are not as robust
(ii) Don't provide such a high gloss
(iii) Harder to apply - because they dry quicker it is harder to get a smooth brush mark free finish

Cheers,

Nigel
 

kav

Distinguished Member
I wondered about that Nigel, I've never had a problem with Dulux previously but noticed that after recently doing all the skirting, etc in the house, that it's gone yellowish after only a couple of months. Very frustrating.
 

Wahreo

Distinguished Member
I'm still using the old Dulux gloss. Got about 2l left of a 5 litre pot. It yellows a bit after 4 years. Enough to notice a difference when you paint over but perfectly liveable with how white it is.
 

mh123

Established Member
Dulux Trade High Gloss in White as opposed to Pure Brilliant White.

And make sure it has a blue lid, not a silver lid. The silver lid is the 'dodgy' early yellowing stuff from a formulation change a couple of years ago. The blue lid stuff is pukka.

Whilst not quite as in-yer-face when it first goes on as PBW, it stays white a lot longer in my experience.

Oh, and use a roller wherever you can for the best finish.
 

nheather

Distinguished Member
Dulux Trade High Gloss in White as opposed to Pure Brilliant White.

And make sure it has a blue lid, not a silver lid. The silver lid is the 'dodgy' early yellowing stuff from a formulation change a couple of years ago. The blue lid stuff is pukka.

Whilst not quite as in-yer-face when it first goes on as PBW, it stays white a lot longer in my experience.

Oh, and use a roller wherever you can for the best finish.

Is this oil or water based.

As for using a roller - I've heard this recommendation before but can't get my head around it - well two things in particular

1 - If oil based do you bother to clean the roller or just chuck it. I just can't imagine the effort and the amount of white spirit needed to clean it properly.

2 - Most places where you would use gloss is intricate - skirting, architrave, window frames, doors with recessed panels. I can see how rollers work on big flat spaces but what about all the intricate bits.

Cheers,

Nigel
 
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Wahreo

Distinguished Member
I can understand on a window board, flat cupboard doors etc but generally I use a brush 95% of the time with Gloss.
 

mh123

Established Member
Is this oil or water based.

Oil.

Depends on the surrounds whether you can get away with 'rollering' a skirting board. If you're doing it before carpet and papering then go for it :)

Use the small behind-radiator-sized rollers and chuck 'em. Even in extortionate places like B+Q you can get a 4-pack for under a fiver.
 

nheather

Distinguished Member
Oil.

Depends on the surrounds whether you can get away with 'rollering' a skirting board. If you're doing it before carpet and papering then go for it :)

Use the small behind-radiator-sized rollers and chuck 'em. Even in extortionate places like B+Q you can get a 4-pack for under a fiver.

Okay, that is skirting before carpet and papering. Note that if emulsioning the wall I try to be neat when glossing the top of skirting because gloss on the wall can give emulsion on the top a different look - because the gloss paint is smooth non-porous surface whereas the plaster is relatively rough and porous.

But what about all the other gloss jobs - how would you use a roller on them?

Cheers,

Nigel
 

RicksonGracie1972

Distinguished Member
Always gloss last, unless wallpapering.

I've always been told the opposite.
Normally, after filling in any holes and Caulking small cracks and sanding, I start by painting the ceiling first, then do the gloss and lastly paint the walls.
 

Wahreo

Distinguished Member
Most Pros I know do the glossing last.

I'm no pro but this is the way that works for me too.

Celing- walls- gloss.

Also It's the most efficient in terms of drying times especially when you consider that gloss can take 16 hours to dry and several days+ to fully harden.

You'll get conflicting answers on this and you might be best off going with what you think is best but trust me, I'm right:smashin:
 

IronGiant

Moderator
I veer towards the latter suggestion but in practice tend to do: walls first, then the gloss, then: avoid looking up :D
 
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D

Deleted member 92943

Guest
Im going through this process now too. Payed almost £500 to paint all my flats wood work just over a year ago and it has a heavy yellow tint.

So im slowly and lightly sanding it all down. I've been told that for the best results, it give it a primer undercover and then a Satin top coat.

I'll keep am eye here to see how you guys get on because this is one process i dont want to do again for a few years at least
 

Wahreo

Distinguished Member
I did my living room skirting board 4/5 years ago with Dulux Gloss (decent stuff) and since doing an architrave next to it today, I can say that there is a difference but not huge.

I'm going to leave the skirting for a couple of years before i go over which means that it'll be around 7 years between coats. I do like to decorate quite often though as I get bored quickly and get ideas popping into my head which I tend to crack on with.
 

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