1. Join Now

    AVForums.com uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Decent PC monitor fo calibrating?

Discussion in 'Photography Forums' started by witters, May 20, 2005.

  1. witters

    witters
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2000
    Messages:
    11,940
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    106
    Location:
    Yorkshire
    Ratings:
    +260
    I have never been able to get my monitor to a state where it accurately reflects what appears on my prints.

    Can anyone give me an idea of a monitor which preforms well and is easy to calibrate please?
     
  2. SeaneyC

    SeaneyC
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2002
    Messages:
    2,000
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Reading, Berkshire
    Ratings:
    +54
    Have you tried profiling all of your kit witters? People constantly mention Spyders i've noticed, not really looked much into it, my prints are quite close to my screen by luck more than calibration!
     
  3. witters

    witters
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2000
    Messages:
    11,940
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    106
    Location:
    Yorkshire
    Ratings:
    +260
    Not sure that I know what any of that means.... :D
     
  4. dejongj

    dejongj
    Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2003
    Messages:
    28,065
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    Beautiful South
    Ratings:
    +4,494
    Take a look at LaCie...http://www.lacie.co.uk select products, then color...They are designed for color reproduction...But be careful as you will know, change one thing to super quality and it will show the weaknesses of other things in ten fold....JP's law ;-)

    And if you want more reading take a look at http://www.drycreekphoto.com/Learn/monitor_calibration_tools.htm

    I must admit that I am happy with the results of my Dell i9100 WUXGA and Adobe Gamma...Onscreen colours match the print results very well...Some may see a difference but I don't and that is what matters...

    If you can't do it yourself using Gamma, perhaps a Spyder or the like is more useful for you...
     
  5. Crocodile

    Crocodile
    Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2002
    Messages:
    15,311
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Ratings:
    +4,574
    Photoshop should have installed Adobe Gamma in the Windows Control Panel. Just run this & follow the wizard. It won't calibrate to reprographic standards but it should give you a reasonable proximity to printed output & tame some of the wild brightness levels that seem inherent in modern LCDs.
     
  6. ASH1

    ASH1
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2003
    Messages:
    1,208
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    51
    Ratings:
    +61
    Hi Witters, it's not just your monitor that needs calibrating to get prints to match what you see on screen. Take it from me it can be a long and frustrating process trying to get everything right.

    First of all you'll need something like a Spyder to calibrate your monitor. Then you can either use paper like Ilford and download their free general printer profiles, or you can use something like Fotospeed paper and have free Custom profiles. You only get free custom profiles if you use their papers.

    You may know but with a custom profile you'll have to send them some test sheets and they will make you a profile for your printer/ink. I took the custom profile route in the end and I'm now getting great results. Give Fotospeed a ring and ask to speak to Ray, he will be able to explain thing to you better than I can. This is only worth doing if you use something like Photoshop.

    ASH1
     
  7. witters

    witters
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2000
    Messages:
    11,940
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    106
    Location:
    Yorkshire
    Ratings:
    +260
    Can't find Adobe Gamma anywhere...?

    Ash,

    That sounds like a real pain in the ass :D

    I get most of my printing done at Photobox. I'd just like to have an idea what they are like as normally they come back a lot better than they look on screen?
     
  8. dejongj

    dejongj
    Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2003
    Messages:
    28,065
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    Beautiful South
    Ratings:
    +4,494
    In XP...Control Panel, Appearance and Themes...

    I quite like peak-online, they provide ICC profiles for their service as well...
     
  9. ASH1

    ASH1
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2003
    Messages:
    1,208
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    51
    Ratings:
    +61
    Yes it can be a pain in the ass but it was worth it in the end. As for finding Adobe gamma have you done a search for it?.

    ASH1
     
  10. witters

    witters
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2000
    Messages:
    11,940
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    106
    Location:
    Yorkshire
    Ratings:
    +260
    Can't find it anywhere. Did a search for Gamma but nothing there :confused:
     
  11. ASH1

    ASH1
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2003
    Messages:
    1,208
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    51
    Ratings:
    +61
    Try a search for Adobe gamma.

    ASH1
     
  12. witters

    witters
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2000
    Messages:
    11,940
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    106
    Location:
    Yorkshire
    Ratings:
    +260
    Doh - found it. :rolleyes:
     
  13. tomson

    tomson
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2000
    Messages:
    1,918
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    66
    Location:
    Berk'amsted
    Ratings:
    +187
  14. witters

    witters
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2000
    Messages:
    11,940
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    106
    Location:
    Yorkshire
    Ratings:
    +260
    Nice one tomson :smashin:
     
  15. ancientgeek

    ancientgeek
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    1. Of course the ambient lighting has a huge effect on the appearance of prints; your monitor and lighting both need to be set appropriately. For example, you can't expect the monitor to match a print both in daylight and in incandescent light without recalibration.
    2. changing colours and brightness depending on viewing angle are a major problem for colour calibration of LCD monitors. It's much simpler to go with CRT.
    3. Apple (LCD) monitors are designed to be suitable for imaging professionals, but they are DVI only.
     
  16. dejongj

    dejongj
    Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2003
    Messages:
    28,065
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    Beautiful South
    Ratings:
    +4,494
    In the same way that the Mac is more suitable for imaging professionals? Or do they do something different to them when the panels are being manufacturered at their OEM suppliers?

    BTW You make it sound like it is a bad thing to have DVI only? I was under the impression that is it actually a great thing and safes two conversion stages...
     
  17. ancientgeek

    ancientgeek
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    dejongj

    Mac OSX (and OS9) have included "Colorsync" for many years, software to get consistent colour from end to end of a production process. Colorsync lets you calibrate multiple points on the colour map of your monitor, not simply gamma and colour temperature. That is one reason why graphics professionals like Macintosh.

    Of course Apple (Dell, HP etc) don't make their own LCD panels. But Apple evaluate the panels they select for their monitors, and the way they are driven, to suit their market. You will get a wide range of colours, minimal variation with viewing angle, good reproducibility despite ageing etc. Often this may mean that the screen appears to have a "worse" spec in some other respect, for example brightness. (When you have calibrated your montor, it is often much less bright). Equally good panels are available elsewhere, but it isn't easy to determine their suitability. It's just that Apple specifically consider these requirements ahead of other features. So if you are doing design, imaging or video, an Apple screen is not a bad choice. LaCie also specialise in this market.

    So, yes, Apple (& Lacie) do something different; mainly they choose a suitable panel and drive electronics, and supply colour profiles for them.

    You are right: DVI is better. But there are two disadvantages with Apple's DVI only screens: 1. many PC's and all older pc's/Macs are still made with analogue only output and 2. you can't connect two computers (1 dvi and 1 vga) and flip between them. That's why I'm using a Dell 24" screen instead of an Apple 23" screen on my Mac & PC. Price and overall quality is pretty much the same.
     

Share This Page

Loading...