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Dead Pixels

Discussion in 'Projectors, Screens & Video Processors' started by Nobber, May 19, 2002.

  1. Nobber

    Nobber
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    Ok i have finally decided its going to be the Sony VPL-VW11HT

    the cheapest i can buy this is from sound and vision Bolton(£3,600), but they won't let me check for dead pixels! Now I am happy to pay a bit of a premium because I can not bear the thought of dead pixels when I have just spent about £4K


    is there anyone who can put me in contact with a company who will either agree to exchange or let me view at the shop?

    I also want to buy a Sony VAe55s amp (£699)

    so if this heps I'll purchase this too

    I want to collect this coming Saturday


    any offers?


    thanks
     
  2. chienmort

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    The cost of projectors if all panels wity minor defects were rejected would be astronomical.

    Because of the volume sales of projectors like the AE100, some dealers will charge a dead pixel inspection fee knowing that they can use this to subsidise sales to the less fussy user.

    The projector you are looking to buy is a professional unit and as sales for these are lower, the chances of the dealer being prepared to offer this service is much lower.
     
  3. Guest

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    The problem for the dealer is if they allow you to check for dead pixels and you reject it, then the projector is 'used' and harder to sell. Do they then order another one from Sony, and allow you to do the same thing again?

    I think chienmort is right in the points he made. I think also, the AE100 must be pretty dead pixel free (latest panel technology dont forget) and that is why the dealers are willing to run the risk.

    Besides, if a dead pixel is going to worry you that much then I think you should stick to CRT. If you cant live with such a (tiny) defect, you aint gonna enjoy the picture anyway (screen door, contrast, etc)

    El
     
  4. Kramer

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    I can assure you that a hot/open pixel in the middle of the screen is not a "tiny" defect :eek:

    Screendoor, contrast, etc, are all acceptable for most people, as indeed will be a couple of dead pixels, but as I said, try to live with hot pixels, I think not.
     
  5. Der_Pobman

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    Kramer - true, especially if its green. However if you have even one green stuck pixel panasonic will replace the unit (so AV-Sales told me anyway). I dont remember what the number is for the other colours, 2 or 3 for red and blue? Stuck pixels are annoying, dead pixels are less so.

    Out of all the units AV-sales had sold, until April 30th, they only had 1 with pixel problems (which was 4 stuck blue, and so panasonic replaced it). They had 2 more returned to them with pixel problems, but in both those cases it was just dust DOH!

    I dont think there are that many problems with the AE100... remember it has less pixels than many PJs (lower resolution) and so is less likely to have problems anyway!

    Regards

    Der Pobman
     
  6. LV426

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    In the case of the WV11, there are more pixels on the panel than with the Panny - a million on each panel. Therefore a single bad pixel is one millionth of the screen area in size.

    I have a stuck bright green one on my VW10. It isn't exactly central, but equally, it isn't right in a corner either.

    It isn't visible in normal use from normal viewing distance. Even if you know where to look (as I do) it is still VERY difficult to find. Even on a black image. It does not detract at all from the viewing experience.
     
  7. Iain Bartlett

    Iain Bartlett
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    Making sure your projector has no dead pixels is an ever present concern in the forum. If the supplier wont check it were concerned that we will get it home and we will be stuck with a machine with a few dead ones – within the manufacturers tolerence as the vendor’s tell us. But this is not the case. A consumer can terminate their contract with a vendor who is selling in the course of a business, by rejecting the goods due to breach of Section 14, The Sale of Goods Act 1979 (as amended by the Sale and Supply of Goods Act 1994). S. 14(2b) of the Act specifies that goods should be free from minor defects. The failure of these pixels constitutes "minor defects".

    I had 3 Toshiba MT1’s before I got a clean one. But there are further problems with LCD’s, such as visible picture structure, vertical lines – contrast has never bothered me but I can see how it can affect people with washed out darkness etc.. I wont buy another LCD when the time comes – hopefully not for a while! DLP and CRT should have dropped in cost by then.

    If your new to projectors, when you go for a demo you will be blown away – whatever current model you see. The size and picture will look great. But after you’ve been viewing for a while and the WOW!! Factor subsides, even without dead pixels you may well find you start to notice these other problems…maybe not today, and maybe not tomorrow, but soon, and for the rest of your projectors life…..
     
  8. Guest

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    I think that you would have a hard time arguing dead pixels that fall within the manufactures tolerance is a minor defect.

    When ever you buy anything, TV, Video, PJ the manufacturer sets out the specifications for that device (usually at the back of the instruction book). If the device falls below these specifications it is clearly defective or mis-advertised in which case you have a recourse in law.

    If a pj maker specifies a certain number of dead pixels as within specification then that is exactly what they are selling you.
     
  9. Kramer

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    I learned from my experiences with a Dell supplied 15.1 TFT monitor (2 adjoining hot pixels, very unacceptable), that there is no universal standard for this kind of "defect".

    It is "vendor specific".

    If a manufacturer states that up to 7 dead/hot pixels is within spec, & you have less than this, then you have a fully functioning, as designed product.

    I did eventually get a replacement, but not without the intervention of the CC company.

    HT PJs should have a different tolerence from data/presentation PJs. IMO.
     

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