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Dead Pixel On My New CRT Help!

Discussion in 'General TV Discussions Forum' started by EviL AnGeL, Mar 9, 2005.

  1. EviL AnGeL

    EviL AnGeL
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    I've just got a Philips 28pw9309 and after spending a few hours setting it up and testing it with different sources I was really happy with it until I came to give the screen a wipe down and noticed that I have a dead black pixel in the middle of the screen about 4 inches from the bottom. And no this is not a speck of dirt. Thats what I thought it was at first.

    I thought dead pixels only happened on plasma and LCD. Can CRT's have dead pixels? Is 1 dead pixel acceptable for this type of tv? Are Philips likely to have a policy about this or is it a sure fire fault and definite replacement?

    I would actually like to avoid sending it back as the dead pixel can't even be seen from a normal viewing distance. Is there anything I can do to fix this myself? Any suggestions would be appreciated.

    UPDATE
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    After looking closer at it it seems that it's not the whole pixel but just the green line segment of the pixel that seems to be stuck on black or the blue is bleeding over into it. Could this be dust on the inside of the tube? Or broken phospher element.
     
  2. Laurel&Hardy

    Laurel&Hardy
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    It's known as a blocked aperture and no, it's not something exclusive to LCD or Plasma. Every display technology has some form of pixel failure. In the case of CRT it will be a small particle of glass/dust/carbon/aluminum stopping the electron beam from lighting the pixel. If there is blue visible then there was a small fault in the phosphor process.

    Just one colour pixel is in that area is probably deemed acceptable from what I know about tube plants. If you look at it from normal viewing distance is it very noticeable?
     
  3. EviL AnGeL

    EviL AnGeL
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    No not really. From a normal viewing distance you can't see it all but 1-3 feet from the screen you can see it fairly clearly on a light coloured background (especially white) and looks like a small black speck of muck. I've had my face right on the screen with a freeze frame and I can actually see a very small amount of green coming from the blocked colour dot so it does seem like it is something partially blocking it as you say.

    I wonder if 2 people turn the tv on it's back in the air and give it a little shake would it maybe clear the blockage? I know it's a small thing and I can probably live with it but I only got the TV today and I was more concerned it might be a sign of potential problems in the future.
     
  4. red16v

    red16v
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    Hi, don't turn the tv back up ! - if you're going to try it turn it face up. By all means give it a good smacking and see if the debris clears - it might. However, it depends at which stage of manufacture the debris obscured the 'hole' as to what the result might be - if it was during phosphor deposition then most likely you will end up with a 'coloured' dot (depending on the colour the tv is trying to show). If it was after phosphor deposition then if you can clear the debris you might just get away with it. Another 'trick' to try is turning the tv contrast up to full whack for 10 mins or so. The additional beam current will cause the shadowmask to heat up and expand - it may assist in dislodging the debris.

    If that fails take the tv set back to your retailer. It is not acceptable for a modern tv set to have any phosphor dot failures. Regards, yt.
     

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