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dd5.1 & dts

Discussion in 'Blu-ray & DVD Players & Recorders' started by MrFurious, Jul 31, 2003.

  1. MrFurious

    MrFurious
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    just bought a new panny scht500 and it has dolby digital and new to me,dts.i have to wait 2 weeks for delivery so what is dts like?is it a lot different to dd5.1?
     
  2. chris6364

    chris6364
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    I may be corrected on this but this is what i view it like:

    Dolby Digital is the 'traditional' sound format of DVD players, as it is compatible with all types of display devices (in terms of the sound accompanying the on screen image). For example a typical widescreen TV will output the Dolby Digital soundtrack as a pseudo Stereo (it downmixes the 5.1 channel to just 2 - left & right).

    To benefit from full Dolby Digital sound (i.e all 5 speakers and the sub) an appropriate 'home cinema kit' is required. This can be bought as seperates (e.g receiver, speakers & sub) or as a pack. For ease of use for a first timer, an all in one pack (receiver, speakers and sub) from the likes of Sony, Yamaha and a few others. This will decode the 5.1 signal to give the full home cinema experience.

    DTS (for suitably encoded discs - mailnly US Region 1 but alot of Region 2, such as New Line/Entertainment In Video release and some Universal are starting to feature this too) in general, offers a better sound. As it is encoded at a higher bit rate, the sound is less compressed, and so, in theory, the sound field is better.

    However, it's not always the case, as the recent Gangs Of New York (region 2 edition - region 1 DTS was very good) proved. The dts soundtrack on this was flat and very poor, whereas the Dolby Digital track does for the film as it should've - and thats bringing it to life!

    Hope that helps - hope that's right!!

    Feel free to add corrections below...
     
  3. chubben

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    DD5.1 is 448kbps or 384kbps.
    DTS is 1059kbps fullrate or 754kbps halfrate.
    So DTS is of considerable higher bandwidth.. however there are more than this.

    DD5.1 at 448kbps maintains a 20kHz audio frequency and 18kHz 384kbps. for the audio frequency means when it begins its -3dB roll-off.

    DTS at 1059kbps performs really great and show good audio bandwidth however
    DTS 754kbps maxes at around 15kHz, i.e. when there is a -3dB roll off. DTS at 754kbps will have audio frequency above 15kHz of course, but at reduced level.

    so, DTS isnt necessarily better than DD5.1.. however for DTS, full bit-rate is the only way.. half bit-rate have more problems...
     
  4. chubben

    chubben
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    oh also, this of course is not all there is to DD5.1 vs. DTS.... so these figures is concerning standard DD5.1 and DTS.. and not any of the other DD/DTS formats..
     
  5. Reiner

    Reiner
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    There is no answer as to which format is better and no-one has ever been able to make a fair and correct comparision to reach such a conclusion.
    In the end it depends on how much care has been taken during the mastering, i.e. sometimes DD can sound better, sometimes DTS.
    They are just competing formats and I wouldn't give to much on technical specs (more important is the efficiency of the encoder and not so much the data rate) or marketing BS.

    For more insight into the subject please read this article, it also touches on the subject of comparing the two:
    http://home.clear.net.nz/pages/adbarr/page1.html
     

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