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david gray's new album - copy protected :(

owain_thomas

Active Member
Just bought david gray's new album (life in slow motion) and for the first time ever I haven't been able to rip a CD using EAC...

I can't explain how mad I am about this, I bought the damn thing, all I want to be able to do is listen to it on my home system which happens to be a media server/HCPC setup! :mad: :mad: :mad: :mad:

Does any one know of software which can circumvent this annoying crap?
 

The Dude

Distinguished Member
depends on the copy type... I'd give A-ray scanner a whirl and see what it tells you about the disc
 

Eddy Boy

Novice Member
You could agrue it is no longer a CD as the copy protection added is outside the specifcation for CDs layed down by Phillips.

Ho Hum.
 

owain_thomas

Active Member
not very much unfortunately, gives details of the length of the CD and the number of tracks, sector scan simply says no protection detected :(
 

The Dude

Distinguished Member
A small spanner in the works that... :eek:

I rip everything I buy as well, so will do some research matey, post back if you find anything, I'll do the same..
 

LV426

Administrator
Staff member
As a last resort - stick the CD in a regular CD player, connect analog (line out) up to your soundcard (line in), and re-record it onto your HDD. You'd be hard pressed to notice any real degradation......
 

Erick

Standard Member
You could always download the album as well, surely it can't be illegal if you already have the CD.
 

GazH

Active Member
Had the same with an album a few month ago...

Can't remember where I read this but...

When you put the CD in the drive hold down <SHIFT> to prevent the CD from Autorunning (when it Autoruns it sets up something to copy protect the CD) or switch off CD autorunning (Auto Insert Notification?) for the drive.
If you have already allowed the CD to autorun reboot the machine and try again.

Obviously if you are running MCE you probably don't want to switch off Autorunning or don't have a keyboard connected so you may have to do this from a different machine and copy the album over after.

It worked for me....might be worth giving it a whirl

HTH

Cheers

Gaz
 

The Dude

Distinguished Member
Unless it's something really fancy, I'd imagine 'Alcohol 120%' should get you around the problem...certainly works for anything which insists on installing those awful media players to get discs reading on the PC.... you make a clone of the CD minus its nasty bits, then rip the clone using EAC as per normal...
 

Monty Burns

Well-known Member
Hey Guys

there was a form of protection added to CD's a while ago. You will need to do some research to "fix" it yourself but once you know how you do it all you need is a black marker pen!

It involves something like the TOC (table of Contents). I *believe* and my memory is very bad, that a CD player logic only uses the TOC on the Inner ring but, for some reason the TOC is read on the outer ring in preference on CD-Rom (and DVD I guess?) drives. Now, if I remember rightly (and i probably don't), if a CD has no outer ring then a computer CD-rom drive will then resort to the inner ring that cd-players always use.

The idea is that a duff outer ring shows nothing is installed on a disk meaning, that when it is read in a CD-ROM drive it shows a blank legally formated disk. The simple method I remember reading round this was to take a black cd-marker to the outer ring, making it invalid and forcing your cd-rom drive to read the TOC from the inner ring!

I have never had to do this though so I have no idea if I was being fed BS or the truth.
 

Monty Burns

Well-known Member
/me does the happy dance

Check this out for more details on TOC scrambling. I was *almost* right, at least going in the right direction.

and there is lots of bit of information regarding it here

I do think it sucks donkeys that you cannot backup your own data. Take my example, I moved to Germany recently and will be going to China. Instead of being able to just rip everything i have (Dvd's to Divx, music to MP3) i have to carry around all my disks. Space and weight are valuable to me, VERY valuable. Ive got over 150 DVD's and around 1000 CD's, all these could so easily sit on a couple of hard disks and I could leave my originals at home.

Sucks don't it?!
 

RobsterD

Active Member
Had same prob with a Blue Nile disc,I copied the disc with CloneCD,this got rid of the copy protection and then ripped with EAC ,might work
 
owain_thomas said:
not very much unfortunately, gives details of the length of the CD and the number of tracks, sector scan simply says no protection detected :(
Go but the Cd off Napster, then you can Remove the DRM protection...works everytime for me....
 

probedb

Banned
I find AnyDVD is excellent for removing copy protection from CDs.

Alternatively since you own the album see if you can find a lossless version on newsgroups. I had to do this with the DualDisc of NIN - With Teeth as my DVD-ROM was having non of it!
 

Monty Burns

Well-known Member
philb said:
maybe the player realised how rubbish the cd was?? ;)
:rotfl:

Ahh who knew AI would FINALY be useful and so intelligent!
 

owain_thomas

Active Member
philb said:
maybe the player realised how rubbish the cd was?? ;)
:rotfl: :rotfl: sound just like my wife, she hates david gray!

thanks to everyone for their very useful contributions. I'll give this stuff a go later and see if I can get it working. If not I'll be returning the CD as it is useless to me. I've half a mind to return it if I do manage to rip it just to spite the b******s ;)
 

cameronl

Novice Member
I sometimes find that running a software 'backup' utility on a different drive does the trick. If I have troubles running EAC/DVD Decrypt at home on a peice of software then I try another drive - this always seems to work.

CaM
 

owain_thomas

Active Member
thanks for the tips. Got this working now:

Ripped the disc's image using Alcohol 120%, mounted the image with Daemon tools and ripped it to ape files using EAC. A bit more convoluted but not really any longer than doing it straight with EAC.
 
owain_thomas said:
thanks for the tips. Got this working now:

Ripped the disc's image using Alcohol 120%, mounted the image with Daemon tools and ripped it to ape files using EAC. A bit more convoluted but not really any longer than doing it straight with EAC.
don't you loose quality as you have already ripped the tracks with alocohol?, so what's the point ripping it again other than to compress it and loose more quality, as is alocohol not perofming a DAE on your disc...
 

owain_thomas

Active Member
don't you loose quality as you have already ripped the tracks with alocohol?, so what's the point ripping it again other than to compress it and loose more quality, as is alocohol not perofming a DAE on your disc...
hi meansizzler,

I'm not sure that alcohol would lose quality in ripping the CD, my understanding was that it reproduces a disc image. as far as I understand it it isn't extracting the audio tracks, merely copying the image, minus the copy protection. I stand to be corrected on this as I have not really used alcohol before.

just to be clear though, I used alcohol to copy the image of the CD. I then used EAC to read this image, in exactly the same way as it reads a standard CD. EAC compresses this wav file into an ape file (losslessly, so not losing any fidelity). I didn't use alcohol to rip MP3s or other compressed formats of the audio tracks.
 

GrahamMG

Well-known Member
I do so hate the words "lossless compression", it never sits that easy with me but.........
 

owain_thomas

Active Member
I do so hate the words "lossless compression", it never sits that easy with me but.........
why not? do .zip files lose information during the compression process? or have I misunderstood you - do you mean it on a more semantic level?
 

GrahamMG

Well-known Member
owain_thomas said:
why not? do .zip files lose information during the compression process? or have I misunderstood you - do you mean it on a more semantic level?
Owain.

.zip cannot be compared to sound files being played via a compression method....... .zip unpacks to exactly the same size as the original hence it isn't compressed when you use it, this has to be done before the file can be used, audio compression systems throw something away and just play back what's left.... That is why things like MP3 sound inferior to CD......
I was just passing comment on the perverse nature of calling something "lossless compression" as the two definitions are at odds with each other in theory.....
I would add that if people can hear a difference between a CD @ 44.1KHz/16bit and a two channel 192KHz/24bit then any compression method that shrinks the original file size permenently must throw something away and someone will be able to hear, if a method unpacks the file to the same original size, that isn't playing a compressed format now is it (lossless or otherwise). Try zipping up a .wav file, it shouldn't shrink much.......
 

owain_thomas

Active Member
GrahamMG said:
.zip cannot be compared to sound files being played via a compression method....... .zip unpacks to exactly the same size as the original hence it isn't compressed when you use it, this has to be done before the file can be used, audio compression systems throw something away and just play back what's left....
ape and flac files don't throw anything away. at any point you can unpack them to the original, bit-perfect .wav files. No data whatsoever is lost in the compression.

GrahamMG said:
That is why things like MP3 sound inferior to CD......
Couldn't agree more

GrahamMG said:
I was just passing comment on the perverse nature of calling something "lossless compression" as the two definitions are at odds with each other in theory.....
I know what you mean, it is a bit of an oxymoron. It doesn't mean it's not possible to compress a music file without losing some of the data it contains though.

GrahamMG said:
I would add that if people can hear a difference between a CD @ 44.1KHz/16bit and a two channel 192KHz/24bit then any compression method that shrinks the original file size permenently must throw something away and someone will be able to hear

but lossless audio compression is not a permenant shrinking of the file, at any point you can unpack it just like you can a zip file.

GrahamMG said:
if a method unpacks the file to the same original size, that isn't playing a compressed format now is it (lossless or otherwise).
not quite sure what you mean here. to my mind the 300+ CDs I have stored in .ape format are compressed because they take up less room on my media server than they would if they were ripped as wav files. They are losslessly compressed because they can be reconstituted to their exact, bit-perfect state at any point - no data has been lost. Whether the point of reconstitution occurs as the file is played back through a media player or as a permenant step using a decompression utility is, to my mind, irrelevant.

GrahamMG said:
Try zipping up a .wav file, it shouldn't shrink much.......
Maybe not but zip compression is not optimised for audio files, flac/ape compression is and does a decent job of reducing the disk space required to store music. It also lets you add tags which you can't do with wav files.
 

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