"Dangerous" dogs - question

Trollslayer

Distinguished Member
Can you get buns in the right size?
 
Can you get buns in the right size?

Maybe they're called Onion and Relish.

This is one, I think.

dapple-boy.jpg
 
D

Deleted member 843310

Guest
Now look, lassie, you've already got two! :rotfl:
I'd have an army of them if I could!! 😂

But money and practically stops me and particularly as my 2 run rings around me and I'm a complete slave to them 😕
 

krish

Distinguished Member
Mini sausage dogs.
You might like this YouTube channel
 

Smiffy 2

Well-known Member
When the kids were small we "acquired" a small puppy, think it was a cross between a Jack Russell and a Lakeland Terrier. Lovely looking dog, really cute.
One Sunday morning he was up in our bedroom, lying on the foot of the bed, and our little girl came running in from her room and jumped on the bed to say "good morning". Dog turned on her, snapped and caught her just below the eye. Frightened the life out of us all, because up until that point he had been as good as gold.
He only got the one chance, we took him to our local animal rescue centre and they found a new home for him within a day or two.
Reason was lack of training. Totally. He hadn't been taught he was further down the pecking order than the human members of the family.
 

John3:16

Active Member
Can I just state, there is no such thing as a dangerous dog breed! Yes, there may be dogs that are dangerous due to their owners irresponsible handling and training of them, as seems the case here, but no breed is born dangerous.
In the incidents described by the OP, it is the Mastiff’s owners fault in every way. A reactive dog like that, regardless of breed, should never be unsupervised, and should always be on the lead outside of the house. It’s as simple as that. If the dog was trained, under the owners control and on the lead, there would not even be the need for a muzzle. Obviously this was not the case here and it is only the owner that is to blame for any consequences. I would suggest rehoming the dog may be the best option after these repeated incidents.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Gondawanna Man

Standard Member
Definitely the right forum it being a “WOOFER” (did I get there first?😅
Anyway really sick of how so many cowardly nanny state ppl want to blame the dog. ItS ALWAYS the owner and the dog suffers. The owner needs to take this animal to a professional trainer for re-education as it’s suffered from neglect or torment or both. I own a Bull Mastiff Male with a full set of tennis balls and he’s got a beautiful temperament because I took the time to nurture him as I did with my English Bull Dog and Rottweiler before (oh yeah and my daughters lol). They are just like children and respond to kindness cruelty or neglect in proportion.
Now I’m gonna put on some Mozart to chill🤙
 

paulyoung666

Distinguished Member
Can I just state, there is no such thing as a dangerous dog breed! Yes, there may be dogs that are dangerous due to their owners irresponsible handling and training of them, as seems the case here, but no breed is born dangerous.
In the incidents described by the OP, it is the Mastiff’s owners fault in every way. A reactive dog like that, regardless of breed, should never be unsupervised, and should always be on the lead outside of the house. It’s as simple as that. If the dog was trained, under the owners control and on the lead, there would not even be the need for a muzzle. Obviously this was not the case here and it is only the owner that is to blame for any consequences. I would suggest rehoming the dog may be the best option after these repeated incidents.

Uh , what about the dangerous dogs act then , I do agree about the way they are treat and trained to a degree , any dog will bite though , it’s hard wired into them !!!!
 
Last edited by a moderator:

gibbsy

Moderator
I've seen dogs react and bite out of sheer panic and fright and I've seen a couple of colleagues getting bitten when trying to rescue a dog. Luckily our heavy tunics stopped any bite from being serious. Rather see them re-acting like that than bringing out the limp bodies as many homeowners will be more concerned about the family pet than the home itself as long as all the people are out.

Our Cocker girl was bitten on the face at a dog show by a male Golden Retriever. Drew blood with a nasty bite that required a visit with the on call vet. Finished her show career as she got very frightened around other dogs for a while. Not the first time this particular Golden had bitten a dog in the show ring and as a consequence the dog was banned from showing by the Kennel Club.
 

gibbsy

Moderator
removed by modearator
The dogs that were put on that list were there for a reason. That was to deter their ownership as those breeds when they attacked had serious fire power to inflict damage. Would you rather be attacked by an ankle biter or a Pit Bull.

A lot of people will innocently buy a breed not knowing what it was actually bred to do. They may also buy on from a source where little thought has gone into the mating.

If you buy a big powerful dog you have a responsibility and any dog brought up properly, socialised and treated with kindness. We all think of children when we talk of dog attacks and I always tell children that want to stroke our Cocker than they let her come to them, if she wants to. She's getting old and doesn't want a child coming quickly towards her.

I've also had an Irish Setter who thought children were put on this earth for him to play with. Only dog I would ever have trusted 100% with any child. He had an uncanny link to disabled people, a one of a kind.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Autopilot

Distinguished Member
removed by moderator

Only 4 dogs are listed under the DDA - Pit Bull Terrier, Japanese Tosa, Dogo Argentino and Fila Brasileiro. I don’t know how many of these dogs are actually put down, ‘thousands’ seems a lot, but I disagree it’s all down to the owner. Dogs have characteristics bred into them, that’s why we have so many different types, and some breeds are bred to fight and be aggressive, which is very dangerous in a domestic situation with children, or around other dogs.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Morty

Active Member
Neighbours wouldn't get the chance to call the police. If someone's dog did that to mine I shoot the animal where it stood and hand the owner a shovel and say "dig away"
 

Rasczak

Distinguished Member
Can I just state, there is no such thing as a dangerous dog breed!
You can state what you want but it doesn't make it true. Some dogs are, by definition of their size and tooth size, capable of inflicting horrific injuries.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Trollslayer

Distinguished Member
Most of it is how they are brought up.
 

arenaman

Moderator
Some posts have had to be edited or removed @John3:16 please refrain from insulting forum members in future
 

The latest video from AVForums

AVForums Movies Podcast: Streaming Theatrical Releases And The Future Of Cinema
Subscribe to our YouTube channel

Latest News

AVForums Movies Podcast: 1st December 2021
  • By Phil Hinton
  • Published
Rumour: Samsung even closer to OLED TVs in 2022?
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
Audio-Technica launches ATH-SQ1TW true wireless earphones
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
What's new on UK streaming services for December 2021
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
Best Projectors of 2021 - Editor's Choice Awards
  • By Steve Withers
  • Published

Full fat HDMI teeshirts

Support AVForums with Patreon

Top Bottom