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"Dangerous" dogs - question

Firstly, not sure we have a pets section so, hope this can be housed in GC.

I love dogs, I love all animals but as a cat owner, dogs aren't really my domain.

Just then in our road, everything kicked off as my neighbour went out to take her two small dogs on their evening walk.

Her dogs don't like my cat so when the uproar started I assumed Duchess was around and it was just her dogs getting excited in seeing my cat.

I went out and saw the neighbours dog from next door, a Mastiff bitch attacking her dogs.

I managed to get the dog off and it's owner was nearby and for the time being, that was that.

Then a group of residents a few doors down were saying to the Mastiff owner that they had seen it attack people and other animals in the street. I've never seen this but then I'm not around in the daytime.

One guy began an argument with the Mastiff owner saying it should be on a lead, or put down (according to another lady resident).

The Mastiff owner hotly disputed this, defending his pet, yes I understand that But these large dogs take some controlling and while the dog was still loose and he was arguing in the street and my immediate neighbour was still on our path with her dogs, the Mastiff appeared again and pinned the little pug to the floor.

Managed to separate them again, by which time the argument continued and the guy up the road had called the police.

My neighbour was crying and had gone to sit in the other side of the road calling her pets and I was right by her when suddenly out of nowhere because I thought the Mastiff was inside, it returned and AGAIN pinned the pug to the floor, inflicting damage this time as she said its tongue had turned blue and on further inspection said its neck was ripped open.

There was blood but as she phoned her Mum and I phoned the police because obviously the injured animal needed attention and at this time of night I wasn't sure who best to call.

I sat in my neighbours flat with her two dogs reassuring them, I'm pleased to say that the pug seens to be fine, her and Mum gave driven to a vet and the police have left now, but a dog warden also attended and she was talking to the Mastiff owner in his flat last I know.

Oh, he just came down my flat to ask me to tell my neighbour that he will cover all medical bills, he said there will be because of emergency treatment?

He said he has been told that his dog is under investigation but it has not been taken away and that he has to get her chipped.

I'm posting this for a few reasons, one, has anyone had any similar experiences with neighbours and dogs and if so, how were things resolved?

And the second, it was the lady residents comment see, when I said that the Mastiff ought to be on a lead, she said "no, it needs to be put down".

Over reaction or not? Hard to say isn't it without knowing the animal. That Mastiff I've seen so often is a good natured gentle soul yet tonight turned into some kind of rabid monster. Happened right in front of me twice and it was pretty scary.
 
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Miss Mandy

Moderator
It is pretty scary when that happens. Horrible.
A neighbour of mine has a large staffy that is the sweetest thing ever with humans and other larger dogs, but it turns into some kind of monster around small dogs and cats. A couple of months ago it managed to get hold of a cat and it took three people to rescue the cat. He caused quite a bit of damage and the cat had to have a leg amputated. Its not the first time its attacked another animal.
I'm not sure if the investigation is complete yet, but the police and dog warden were both called at the time. The owner was allowed to keep the dog following the incident, but the dog must be kept on a lead and muzzled at all times when out of the house. Sadly the owner isn't keen on that and I have seen him walk it without a muzzle.
Personally I think euthanasia should be a last resort. More often than not it's the owner that's bad not the dog. In cases like this taking it from the owner and rehoming it with a more responsible owner might be fairer for the dog. Having said that though with some dogs once they've got the taste of blood they'll never stop.
 

BlueOrange25

Distinguished Member
That owner is being irresponsible. He should know his dog's temperament, and how small dogs and their owners are wary of certain breeds.

I understand that feeling; I used to have a German Shepherd.

If a dog is prone to aggression around other animals and/or people, the owner should take reasonable measures.

It sounds like his dog needs to be put on a leash when out and about.

The owner also has to pay more attention to times when his dog can get out without him noticing.
 

Sloppy Bob

Distinguished Member
How did the dog keep getting out?

Regardless of size, unless under control dogs should be restricted to the house and a secure, enclosed garden.

The owner sounds like an arse.
 

Tempest

Distinguished Member
I'm with the Chinese when it comes down to cats and dogs.

You mean Cat Curry & Pooch Pie?


Cat-pie.jpg
 
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That owner is being irresponsible. He should know his dog's temperament, and how small dogs and their owners are wary of certain breeds.

His answer, during the heated exchange with said neighbours a few doors down was:

"Don't have a pop at me. She's a rescue dog. You don't know anything about her"

I like Steve generally, as a neighbour but I think he lost all sense of reason there.
 
How did the dog keep getting out?

Quite. There is a gate he built (these are basement flats) before the steps up to street level so after the first incident you would have thought he would have put her inside the property as when behind that gate it's big, I know she never jumps over it, that makes me think that he didn't even shut the gate?

Weirder still, I just went out to take a look and the gate is no longer there!
 
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Tempest

Distinguished Member
Question I hope I am never in a position to need to put into practice.

If a dog comes up to you and attacks you, and had hold of your arm/leg for example in a bite.
Are you legally allowed to use deadly force to stop it?
 

494930

Distinguished Member
That dog should be removed from your neighbours control immediately imo.

To be able to attack another animal three times in one night shows how little control he has of it which is completely unacceptable with such a large breed (not that it's really acceptable with small dogs either). Hope your neighbours wee dogs are OK.
 
That dog should be removed from your neighbours control immediately imo.

To be able to attack another animal three times in one night shows how little control he has of it which is completely unacceptable with such a large breed (not that it's really acceptable with small dogs either). Hope your neighbours wee dogs are OK.

He doesn't have any control over his dog. Won't say the dog's name but if he calls it or even shouts it completely ignores him. Dog's even run down into my place once and ate my cat's food.
 

Hixs

Distinguished Member
Question I hope I am never in a position to need to put into practice.

If a dog comes up to you and attacks you, and had hold of your arm/leg for example in a bite.
Are you legally allowed to use deadly force to stop it?

Does it matter if it's potentially life or death?!

Pretty sure (like 99.9%) that you wouldn't face any charges for killing an animal attacking you.
 

DrPhil

Distinguished Member
That dog should be removed from your neighbours control immediately imo.

To be able to attack another animal three times in one night shows how little control he has of it which is completely unacceptable with such a large breed (not that it's really acceptable with small dogs either). Hope your neighbours wee dogs are OK.
Bingo. The dog is badly behaved and out of control and he should not be allowed to have it. If he claims its a rescue dog then the place he rescued it from possibly didn't vet him properly.

I say this as a former (and future) Rottweiler owner.

I used to be very annoyed when people would judge big Beth harshly purely because she was a Rottie. And my comments on this case are not because the dog is a mastiff. A golden retriever could easily do serious damage to a pug too.
 

Trollslayer

Distinguished Member
The owner is responsible for the dog's behaviour.
 
Firstly, not sure we have a pets section so, hope this can be housed in GC.

I love dogs, I love all animals but as a cat owner, dogs aren't really my domain.

Just then in our road, everything kicked off as my neighbour went out to take her two small dogs on their evening walk.

Her dogs don't like my cat so when the uproar started I assumed Duchess was around and it was just her dogs getting excited in seeing my cat.

I went out and saw the neighbours dog from next door, a Mastiff bitch attacking her dogs.

I managed to get the dog off and it's owner was nearby and for the time being, that was that.

Then a group of residents a few doors down were saying to the Mastiff owner that they had seen it attack people and other animals in the street. I've never seen this but then I'm not around in the daytime.

One guy began an argument with the Mastiff owner saying it should be on a lead, or put down (according to another lady resident).

The Mastiff owner hotly disputed this, defending his pet, yes I understand that But these large dogs take some controlling and while the dog was still loose and he was arguing in the street and my immediate neighbour was still on our path with her dogs, the Mastiff appeared again and pinned the little pug to the floor.

Managed to separate them again, by which time the argument continued and the guy up the road had called the police.

My neighbour was crying and had gone to sit in the other side of the road calling her pets and I was right by her when suddenly out of nowhere because I thought the Mastiff was inside, it returned and AGAIN pinned the pug to the floor, inflicting damage this time as she said its tongue had turned blue and on further inspection said its neck was ripped open.

There was blood but as she phoned her Mum and I phoned the police because obviously the injured animal needed attention and at this time of night I wasn't sure who best to call.

I sat in my neighbours flat with her two dogs reassuring them, I'm pleased to say that the pug seens to be fine, her and Mum gave driven to a vet and the police have left now, but a dog warden also attended and she was talking to the Mastiff owner in his flat last I know.

Oh, he just came down my flat to ask me to tell my neighbour that he will cover all medical bills, he said there will be because of emergency treatment?

He said he has been told that his dog is under investigation but it has not been taken away and that he has to get her chipped.

I'm posting this for a few reasons, one, has anyone had any similar experiences with neighbours and dogs and if so, how were things resolved?

And the second, it was the lady residents comment see, when I said that the Mastiff ought to be on a lead, she said "no, it needs to be put down".

Over reaction or not? Hard to say isn't it without knowing the animal. That Mastiff I've seen so often is a good natured gentle soul yet tonight turned into some kind of rabid monster. Happened right in front of me twice and it was pretty scary.

Big silly over reaction, however it should have never even got to the point it got to. Instant anything happened people should have called their dogs in, got them on leads and taken inside the house and then talked about what happened. Sounds like foolish people to me. Now the animals are going to suffer for silly human mistakes if any get put down.
 

Trollslayer

Distinguished Member
I believe only one dog attacked.
 

Gingerbeard

Prominent Member
As a dog owner it never ceases to amaze me just how irresponsible some owners are! In this instance, the dog should definitely be removed from the owner, not put down, but rehomed to someone that knows how to train and give the dog the attention it needs!

That said, dogs are after all animals (all of which descended from wolves) and therefore are and will always be capable of showing a darker (albeit natural) side. My golden retriever is the sweetest dog you could ever wish to meet, I trust him implicitly, he is amazing around babies, children and most dogs, but every now and again, especially as he is fully in tacked, he takes a dislike to another male dog, teeth snarling, hair all standing up on his back, pulling like crazy to get at the dog. Most of the time he is walked off lead, but if we see another dog approaching, especially one he doesn’t know, he always go on his lead, we just won’t chance it

I personally wouldn’t have another male dog with all his faculties in tacked, its a nightmare when a bitch is in season and other (mainly male) dogs react very differently around him. I can’t tell you how many times we have had someone say ‘oh don’t worry my dogs fine and is friendly‘ and then all of a sudden all hell breaks loose as our boy is being set upon. Then the owner looks really shocked and says ‘oh we‘ve never seen him react or behave like that before’ I don’t think you can ever really 100% completely trust an animal such as a dog, no matter how adorable they may appear to be

My previous dog (In another relationship) was a Rottie and he was also a real softie, had I way less incidents with him, probably because he was neutered and was generally street walked. Where I live now, we are lucky enough to have a country park on our doorstep so our goldie is out on there every day
 

Trollslayer

Distinguished Member
Rotties are natural softies.
 
Polish neighbours nearby have a 6yo red nosed American pitbull who I've always adored.

Fantastic temperament and a softie, if you were a burglar he would say take what you want but rub my tummy for half an hour first.

Can't believe how soft my neighbour is towards Steve seeing as her dogs had been in danger and one injured and the other thing has just come to memory was when he came to ask me to pass the message on re the medical bills.

The guy a few doors down he was having the shouting match with, also East European, said afterwards there was no issue between him and Steve which I said I would pass on so I did when he came down but he said if they ever ganged up on him he would dial 999 because they were foreigners and he was British.

I thought that was odd at the time, thinking what difference does that make, then voiced that opinion to which he replied "Yeah, s'pose".

Interesting what @DrPhil writes earlier as if it's a rescue dog, the Mastiff then he as a prospective owner was not checked out properly, When he took on the flat next door, he didn't have the dog then, this has only been since the start of lockdown.

He should stand by his promise shouldn't he now and find best part of £300 for my neighbour's vets bill.
 
D

Deleted member 27989

Guest
Why oh why weren’t any of the dogs on a lead? My gosh you need better neighbours 😂 This was all so easily avoided if they controlled their dogs; ie use a lead.

There is no need to muzzle the mastiff in my opinion. But there is a need to train the owner first and the dog will fall in line. Being a rescue has nothing to do with it, well other than that training may take a bit more effort.

I’m no fan of putting animals down where the owner is clearly at fault. Train train train until he can control his dog by hand signals alone.

It took me three lessons to figure out that I didn’t take our Labrador Retriever to be trained. It was me being trained in how to handle dogs.

There is a reasonable way out of this but it requires a bit of common sense and dedication.
 

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