damp proofing interior wall advice please

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by reevesy, Aug 4, 2017.

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  1. reevesy

    reevesy
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    hi all,

    basically I'm getting all ready to replace my stud walls down stairs and sound proof as although my house was built in 1901.....it has ..what I'm sure is single course brick work.

    theres a 'crapply' done stud wall already there ....skinny battens...and a single layer of plasterboard.

    I'm planning to rip out...redo with 50mm stud at 600mm spacing....with 50mm rock wool R45 acoustic slab in between...resilient bars and then acoustic plasterboard etc etc.

    did a bit of prospecting today and ripped off a bit of plasterboard to have a better look.....walls looks rough...and damp to touch...and I can smell it so I'm assuming rising damp...plasterboard screws all rusty etc.

    will probably start ripping it all out next week...not 100% sure how treat the interior wall prior to fitting new stud work.?

    so far I'm thinking along the lines of drilling holes along a mortar line and using some of this damp proofing cream i've been looking at.

    like this

    Aida DPC Injection Cream 310ml Cartridge - Damp Proofing

    not really sure the best thing to do.....or if the wall should be coated with something prior to studding?.......had plan to put little strips of roofing felt between the wood studs and wall as they are pretty uneven.

    any advice or ideas would be most appreciated .

    cheers
     
  2. Cocksure

    Cocksure
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    Forget about injection treating a Victorian 9 inch solid brick wall as it never works. I don't know if it's because the bricks are so much more denser than modern bricks or because it's lime mortar that is used is so thin that you wonder if it is really there. But injection treatment nearly always fails.

    Everyone I know who works on pre 1914 houses have long since stopped trying to stop the water come through, instead they manage it either with a tanking system or by building stud walls that do not touch the original walls in any way and put in an air ventilation system to move the air in the gap between the stud wall and original wall

    The really good ones do both, but like everything you need to way up how much you want to pay and how far you are prepared to take things.
     
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2017
  3. blue max

    blue max
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  4. Cocksure

    Cocksure
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    Stands up pretty well to damp walls and I've used it where water has been practically running down the wall. Will last as long as your stud wall does anyhow

    What kills all stud walls in this situation is that the wood/metal frame rots away as your discovering with the stud work you are clearing.

    If you have the money than build the stud wall out of solid concrete blocks, will last years and is excellent for sound proofing, not cheap though
     
  5. blue max

    blue max
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    I'd use treated timber for it for sure
     
  6. Wahreo

    Wahreo
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    Did you say the internal wall is brick?
     
  7. reevesy

    reevesy
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    Thanks all for the replys...on me phone at the mo.

    ..right ..yeah internal wall.

    ..few things...I've already got the soundbloc plasterboard....dense heavy stuff for sound proofing......had thought about a gap..then stud...then thought I might go against the wall and use resilient bar...not decided fully on that one...need and try keep the thickness down if poss...resilient bars are 3 quid each so thought I might go down that route

    ...both methods are for 'decoupling ' as some of you will know.

    Giving myself a lot of work and cost to try and get effective sound proofing ..so cant really vent as that will compromise the whole thing as I see it
     
  8. reevesy

    reevesy
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    ...now thinking I should leave the old stud wall there and put the new stud and insulation on top of it...current stud wall takes up 45 mm once I remove the skirting
     
  9. blue max

    blue max
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    Any timber in contact with a damp wall is asking for trouble. The gap is likely to be equivalent to the bar anyway if you make it well
     
  10. reevesy

    reevesy
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    so would that foiled backed board be ok to stick straight onto the offending wall...foil side first I take it.......then build the stud/acoustic wall layer straight onto that?

    would give me a nice flat true surface to work on if nothing else

    new stud ..up against the foiled backed board ....would look like this

    2 (1).jpg

    hadn't planned to use a barrier matt...but could be an option depending on cost
     
  11. blue max

    blue max
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    No! Nothing in contact with the wall. You won't get the noise insulation advantage either
     
  12. Cocksure

    Cocksure
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    should be an 6 inch air gap (i think) for the sound proofing to work the best as this gives space for the sound waves to "bounce" back of the brick wall. Not many people can do a 6 inch gap, but the larger you can do the better (both sound and damp wise)
     
  13. reevesy

    reevesy
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    just thought the foil would make that iffy any way

    so if I fit skinny as possible battens..thinking maybe the ones use for roofing......foiled backed board onto that......then battens fitted to ceiling and floor /sides ..basically so that its in front of the aqua board stuff ....but nothing drills into that board .....stuff the wool in...then sound board onto that.

    ...see how that performs and take it from there?

    cheers
     
  14. reevesy

    reevesy
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    yeah I've done loads of research into sound proofing...folks on here and tinternet in general

    ...all the various methods and materials...green glue ...mass loaded vinyl etc etc

    settled on using the wool and stud method for downstairs...was hoping get away with around - 70- 80mm.

    cant lose the big spacings that people use in garage conversions etc
     
  15. reevesy

    reevesy
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    what about some other sort of vapour barrier/membrane onto the wall?
     
  16. Cocksure

    Cocksure
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    DPM (damp proof membrane) comes in roughly 5m wide sheets by 10 to 20m long.

    You could tack a cut sheet onto the wall (to temp hold it in place), then place treated timber battens up against it, and then drill through the battens (and dpm) into the brick wall behind for your screw fixings, with the insulation going between the wood battens.

    Downside,
    No air gap, Moisture will collect at the bottom of the DPM where it meets the floor, what some people do is stop the wooden battens about 1 to 2 inches short of the floor so as to prevent timber battens sitting in the damp spots.

    I did my first soundproofing job this way and it reduced the noise level by approx 30 to 35 db,
     
  17. reevesy

    reevesy
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    I know moistures probably got to go somewhere.... All about minimising it and dealing with it without compromising the soundproof work.
     
  18. reevesy

    reevesy
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    picky of the wall

    img 1.jpg
     
  19. ash23t

    ash23t
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    Why is the wall damp? where is the water coming from.

    If water - Is there a leak? is the subsoil wet? High water table or river nearby.
    If moisture - are there high quality bathroom/kitchen extractor fans being used, windows/vents open when weather permits, internal clothes drying?

    What is going on externally? is there soil beds against the wall. air bricks blocked. walls repointed in cement, cement rendered. is it painted with non-breatheable paint.

    Find out why it is damp.
     
  20. reevesy

    reevesy
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    well an internal party wall in a 1901 terraced house....probably not helped by being single course brick work....hence I want to sound proof.

    solid concrete floor ...other than age ...and the whole murky world of rising damp I cant see there being any direct reason for damp ingress.

    ...wall is drier in some areas..looks like salt deposit over the wall

    was reading up on it .....including the big 'rising damp' con etc.

    apparently the world finds our british damp problems a bit of a laugh/mystery ..the dutch don't even build houses with damp proof courses and look where Holland is :confused: !

    just repeating what I've read before I need a tin hat.


    confuses me.....every one talks of the need for ventilation etc etc....old houses were ok before all the double glazing and draught proofing came into play.

    ..now all the eco houses strive for the holy grail of an air tight house...well as air tight as possible.


    :confused::confused::confused::confused: :rolleyes:
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2017

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