Daft question about home network VPN

allserene

Novice Member
Mutt question: I have setup VPN's before (back to year 2000) on single PC's, but now I have a home network and my wife is very concerned that with a VPN, she would be forever having to verify when she logged into her banks etc because it would be a forever changing Ip address.. Is it the case that each PC on the network could chose to connect each time via VPN OR the regular cable? ie can I be on VPN while she is on regular cable internet ? Can we use the same VPN service and only pay ONE monthly fee for our 4 PC's ? I run 64bit and she runs 32 bit... I feel so inadequate, coz I am SO rusty on VPN and it's 20 years ince I was involved with it.... Thanks
 

EndlessWaves

Distinguished Member
I'm not sure what this has to do with TVs?

VPN itself is a protocol to securely connect to a remote network over the internet. The services you're talking about are anonymity services allowing you to route your normal internet traffic through their network, which you've connected to via the VPN protocol. This has the effect of hiding any unencrypted data from your ISP (but it also includes a third party in the loop, so make sure you trust them more than your ISP).

Anyway, the point is that the answer to some of your questions like pricing plans will depend on which service you choose, while the answer to others -such as whether it can be toggled - will depend on which software you're using on your computer and router.
 

allserene

Novice Member
I'm not sure what this has to do with TVs?

VPN itself is a protocol to securely connect to a remote network over the internet. The services you're talking about are anonymity services allowing you to route your normal internet traffic through their network, which you've connected to via the VPN protocol. This has the effect of hiding any unencrypted data from your ISP (but it also includes a third party in the loop, so make sure you trust them more than your ISP).

Anyway, the point is that the answer to some of your questions like pricing plans will depend on which service you choose, while the answer to others -such as whether it can be toggled - will depend on which software you're using on your computer and router.
oh ok TV forum...Sounds like I got the wrong forum on the site... sorry
 

buddyspudface

Active Member
nord vpn lets you run it through your router and your able to isolate ip's from using it ,thats of course if your router is a modern one. i personally run surfshark and its on everything,but not on my router. just turn off if its not needed and any problems just go away.
 

allserene

Novice Member
Thanks I will note that... I have a nice top end TP-LInk router but I don't like the idea of managing VPN through it in case I inadvertently turn it on for she who must be obeyed..... That would cause her to need new access codes for banks etc...
 

jimscreechy

Active Member
. Is it the case that each PC on the network could chose to connect each time via VPN OR the regular cable? ie can I be on VPN while she is on regular cable internet ?
Generally most VPN's like Express & Nord (two of the better ones) work on individual machines so one having an active VPN on one would in no way affect what the other machine (host) is doing. You can buy multi-user packages from VPN providers so you can use them on more than one machine (say a 4 User license) but still, each PC has an individual VPN connection that operates indignantly of the others. On your home network you could have for example one, two, three or even all four users connected on their individual VPN's, while your wife with no VPN connection could quite happily still use your home network and thus have no problems with changing IP addresses, bank authentication, or anything else.

Now then, As @buddyspudface mentions above, som VPN providers like Nord also offer a VPN via your router. I won't go into detail as many configurations are available on how you want your traffic handled, but essentially this acts like a business solution where you just want all the people to have their internet traffic go over the VPN (say to another office) without having to load individual software packages on each one, or worry about users having to know how to get the connection up before they can work. It centralises the administration, and the connection to make life easy. However for most domestic users, the fist method of individual VPN's per machine is preferred and is normally a better solution.

Also, as I have said in another post VPN is NOT a protocol, it an acronym for method of connection. A mechanism for making a secure network connection if you will.

Hope this helps
 

allserene

Novice Member
Generally most VPN's like Express & Nord (two of the better ones) work on individual machines so one having an active VPN on one would in no way affect what the other machine (host) is doing. You can buy multi-user packages from VPN providers so you can use them on more than one machine (say a 4 User license) but still, each PC has an individual VPN connection that operates indignantly of the others. On your home network you could have for example one, two, three or even all four users connected on their individual VPN's, while your wife with no VPN connection could quite happily still use your home network and thus have no problems with changing IP addresses, bank authentication, or anything else.

Now then, As @buddyspudface mentions above, som VPN providers like Nord also offer a VPN via your router. I won't go into detail as many configurations are available on how you want your traffic handled, but essentially this acts like a business solution where you just want all the people to have their internet traffic go over the VPN (say to another office) without having to load individual software packages on each one, or worry about users having to know how to get the connection up before they can work. It centralises the administration, and the connection to make life easy. However for most domestic users, the fist method of individual VPN's per machine is preferred and is normally a better solution.

Also, as I have said in another post VPN is NOT a protocol, it an acronym for method of connection. A mechanism for making a secure network connection if you will.

Hope this helps
Thank you very much for that informative and comprehensive reply.... Gets me up to speed....
 
Most VPN service provides a connection to more than three simultaneous devices, which means you can protect all these devices simultaneously using a single account. If your wife wants to use the internet without any VPN, then she can turn off the VPN services.

If you have more devices, then its best to set your router with a VPN, everyone who uses the internet will be protected.
 

allserene

Novice Member
Most VPN service provides a connection to more than three simultaneous devices, which means you can protect all these devices simultaneously using a single account. If your wife wants to use the internet without any VPN, then she can turn off the VPN services.

If you have more devices, then its best to set your router with a VPN, everyone who uses the internet will be protected.
My main concern is not to set VPN for my wife (She who must be obeyed), who strongly objects to having to do her bank verification routine if the IP etc changes.. So I want to keep regular connection for her machine..... which means avoiding the router setting
 

allserene

Novice Member
If I have it on my machine, I can read articles on the BBC which are not available to US residents, and I do a lot of financial stuff (Stocks/options/currencies via various brokers etc), and I may be safer with VPN..
 
My main concern is not to set VPN for my wife (She who must be obeyed), who strongly objects to having to do her bank verification routine if the IP etc changes.. So I want to keep regular connection for her machine..... which means avoiding the router setting
Yes, you are right; you will have to avoid setting it up on your router.

If you have multiple devices at your home, you don't have to install a VPN service on her device; otherwise, just turn it off when using the machine.
 

wormvortex

Member
THis is a pretty silly question given he's made it clear he has the requirement for a VPN and his wife because of her business connections, doesn't.
Your post is pretty silly given he had not made it clear at all until I asked and he replied. Furthermore he made no mention of his wife's business connections but instead that it would force additional online banking verifications.

Not sure why you felt the need to reply to a question that wasn't even directed at you?
 

jimscreechy

Active Member
Your post is pretty silly given he had not made it clear at all until I asked and he replied. Furthermore he made no mention of his wife's business connections but instead that it would force additional online banking verifications.

Not sure why you felt the need to reply to a question that wasn't even directed at you?
Ah so a connection to an online banking source is done by... magic? In case you hadn't noticed, this is a forum. Generally the way it works is anyone can answer to any post in the thread... though not all do so sensibly.
 

outoftheknow

Moderator
Thanks to all for their advice to the OP. I think the bickering can stop now though please :thumbsup:
 

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