Answered Curved TVs - Why ?

Venomx999

Active Member
why do people go for curved TVs, is it just personal preference ?
I went to the cinema today for the first time in years and noticed the screen there was slightly curved too.
 

kenfowler3966

Active Member
If you sit centrally and close , on your own, they may be better. Certainly a good argument for curved computer monitors when they are large. The idea is that the distance from your eye to edge of screen is the same as to the centre of the screen for most immersive viewing.

However once you have several people watching or some have to sit off centre, it is a detriment in my opinion.

Certainly most punters agree, as they have died a death now, due to lack of sales. I certainly wouldn't buy one new, or even secondhand.
 

dr no

Moderator
why do people go for curved TVs, is it just personal preference ?
I went to the cinema today for the first time in years and noticed the screen there was slightly curved too.
Was a fad by Samsung to try sell new TVs. Failed and died thank goodness.
 

simonlewis

Well-known Member
I have a curved tv and like it. :clap::smashin::):smoke:
 

gibbsy

Moderator
I wouldn't like one. Too easy to the see the dust on the back.:blush:
 

simonlewis

Well-known Member
I wouldn't like one. Too easy to the see the dust on the back.:blush:
Not unless you wall mount only 3 or 4 inches away from the wall.
 

gibbsy

Moderator
Not unless you wall mount only 3 or 4 inches away from the wall.
I've got a 65'' flatscreen. I'm personally not a fan of curved screen TVs, would not fit in with the viewing angles in my room anyway, wife sits very much off centre. My son loves them and is ruing their demise.
 

invisiblekid

Distinguished Member
Can you even get a curved TV today?
 

DT79

Active Member
There was a year or two when there were no particular new technological innovations to tempt people to upgrade, so the manufacturers needed to come up with something to make people think they were missing out and get them buying.

Fair enough if you brought one and you like it, but I think it’s obvious what the market thought given that you hardly see any new ones now.
 

NicolasB

Well-known Member
The advantage, in so far as there is one, is viewing angle.

For many display technologies, the picture quality is at its best when you're perfectly on-axis - that is, if you draw a line from your eyes to the screen, the screen should be exactly perpendicular to that line, and the more you move to the left or right (or, indeed, up or down) the more the picture degrades.

If you have a large, flat screen and you're sitting directly in front of the centre of the screen, then you are perfectly on-axis for the screen centre, but you are significantly off-axis for the edges and corners. If you get the screen curvature right, a single viewer sitting in the right place can be perfectly on-axis for every pixel on the screen; and even if you're sitting further back than that, you're closer to on-axis for the edges and corners than you would be for a flat screen.

Cinema screens are often curved for a different but related reason: it's much easier to get the image in focus if every point on the screen is exactly the same distance away from the lens.

Personally I much prefer a flat screen - curvature inevitably distorts the image.

That said, if the screen is really huge, or you're sitting very, very close (so close that you have to turn your head to see part of the image), at that point curvature can become useful - when you turn your head, the image on a flat screen will be foreshortened.
 

kbfern

Distinguished Member
When I bought my current 65" 4k tv about 3yrs ago I wanted a flat screen however I viewed quite a few tv's before I bought the set and it was a curved tv in the end as I had such a good deal on the tv, it was a top end £3k tv at launch and was half price as the new models were launched when I got it.

Within days of buying it I must say being curved for me had no issues at all and I sit way off centre when viewing.
 

BrynTeg

Distinguished Member
I have a Curved 65" oled and love it, a few years old now but the picture on it is still great... and the design knocks spots off the models released recently ..
 

Bl4ckGryph0n

Distinguished Member
I've got a curved LG OLED as well. Much prefer it to the flat screen we had before it. It is actually better when you sit off-axis, our L-shaped sofa is 4m long at the long end so impossible to sit infront of any screen. Also deals really well with reflection from natural light.
 

Over by there

Well-known Member
Personal choice, it suited where we were going to put it. In the end I did not get it, at the time the type I was looking at only streamed 4k or had only 4k via HDMI or something. I wanted all options.

Couldn't understand the hate.
 

poppasmurf

Standard Member
I have had a 55" Samsung UHD curved TV for the last two years.

It's been ok, but has made little real difference to my viewing.

Would I have another? Maybe, but I certainly wouldn't pay any sort of premium.

I can't see any difference that would demand any extra cash.
 

MJH1962

Active Member
I don’t recall there being any price premium when I bought my curved Samsung. TBH I forget its curved 99% of the time.
 

trawetSluaP

Novice Member
I had a curved TV, the Samsung UE55MU6670, before it was broken by my partner and replaced.

I'd say it was an OK TV, however, the main benefit (for me) was due to the curving you didn't really get much in the way of reflections from sources to the sides of the TV.

The TV also seemed a little smaller than a non-curved TV.
 

Huw Phillips

Standard Member
It was a solution to a problem that didn't exist and hence it has now gone away and will be replaced by folding phones :)
 

Normal Bias

Active Member
First there was the slightly convex CRT, then the FST, so concave screens are a natural progression (joke). TBH I think they did it because they could, and to try to make some sort of statement/be the next “in thing”.

I bought the last of line LG C6 because I like the passive 3D but didn’t want to stump up the extra for the E6. The curve is quite subtle so wasn’t a deal breaker but would have preferred flat. As my TV is in a corner there’s a small benefit, one could argue, but I don’t really notice it.
 

pantages

Active Member
I think nostalgia influenced me, harking back to the days of curved cinema screens for Cinerama and Todd-AO. My curved Samsung failed after a year and now I have a flat LG OLED!
 

Crippen

Novice Member
The advantage, in so far as there is one, is viewing angle.

For many display technologies, the picture quality is at its best when you're perfectly on-axis - that is, if you draw a line from your eyes to the screen, the screen should be exactly perpendicular to that line, and the more you move to the left or right (or, indeed, up or down) the more the picture degrades.

If you have a large, flat screen and you're sitting directly in front of the centre of the screen, then you are perfectly on-axis for the screen centre, but you are significantly off-axis for the edges and corners. If you get the screen curvature right, a single viewer sitting in the right place can be perfectly on-axis for every pixel on the screen; and even if you're sitting further back than that, you're closer to on-axis for the edges and corners than you would be for a flat screen.

Cinema screens are often curved for a different but related reason: it's much easier to get the image in focus if every point on the screen is exactly the same distance away from the lens.

Personally I much prefer a flat screen - curvature inevitably distorts the image.

That said, if the screen is really huge, or you're sitting very, very close (so close that you have to turn your head to see part of the image), at that point curvature can become useful - when you turn your head, the image on a flat screen will be foreshortened.
From my cinematic background, we never struggled with our many flat screens. There is also an argument for curved cinematic screens for reflected light preservation, especially with 3D. However this does not apply in the home. Curved TVs are purely a gimmick. There is no discernible benefit in the home.
 

stejcush

Novice Member
I bought a Samsung curved screen tv to replace an outdated LG flat screen just short of four years ago. My reason for choosing the curved screen was it was an ex demo so I got it at a reduced price. I like the tv and it has great picture quality but I don't notice the curve whilst viewing. I don't have an opinion on flat versus curved, nor did I when I purchased.
 

blackwiggle

Active Member
Curved screens were a answer to light drop off at the edges of projected images.
Projectors back then weren't the light canons they are today, even in cinemas, mainly because the heat produced would have burnt the film being projected.

I used to build my own curved [Technical name is a Torus Screen ] when I used to run CRT PJ's two decades ago, the light output of those was a fraction of a digital PJ and a curved screen really made the picture more uniform It didn't need much curvature TBH, as the screen wasn't that big....reason being the bigger the screen the lower the brightness.

I'm guessing that curved TV's are produced for a similar reason, but more marketing than any actual need for a curved TV as the screen size wouldn't make it noticable
 

MikeTheBike2010

Active Member
I had a curved TV years ago, a 29” Sony Trinitron CRT. It was a brilliant picture only just recently overtaken by flatscreens in my humble (which of course are much larger). Methinks it curved the opposite way to what everyone else is talking about on this thread (albeit only on one axis unlike the competition) and manufacturers couldnt wait to sell us completely flat screens as they were so much better.

Samsung’s curved screens were a (thankfully) short lived marketing gimmick, that said if you like the one you have good on you, I’m not going to judge.
 

Talisman

Standard Member
I had an LG OLED 65” with a curved screen before changing to another LG 65” OLED but with flat screen. The curved screen (from where it was positioned on the wall) picked up outside lights and reflecting them into the room and viewers eyes.

I would never get another curved screen.
 

stephenbw

Standard Member
I originally bought a curved Samsung because it had great reviews, and the curve meant it was slightly smaller that same size with a flat screen and it would fit perfectly on my furniture. I also thought that it looked more elegant than a flat screen.
I watch TV alone for the most part and sit close to the screen and dead centre, for a great, immersive experience at eye level. I wouldn't recommend one to those who watch with their family, as the picture is significantly degraded if watched from the side. It also wouldn't look good mounted on a wall, but then I don't think any TV looks good on the wall; I feel like I'm watching TV in a pub or hotel room.


I recently had a stupid accident and broke the TV when my vacuum cleaner fell over into it. I had no hesitation in immediately buying another curved Samsung to replace it.
 

delboymutd

Standard Member
Personally I can see the sense in them in a huge cinema to make you feel you are engulfed in the picture but not for home use. For me , just a fad that will go the same way as 3D.
 

Jetgraphics

Novice Member
"The" Definitive Answer:
I wish I had one. Correction, I wish my ultra wide screen monitor was curved.
Why?
When you're sitting close ...24" to 36" distant ... there is a noticeable optical aberration. If looking at the center, the corners appear to bend away. As soon as you turn your head, it's gone. Very annoying.
My son bought a curved monitor and it does not have any optical aberration. When you look straight ahead, the screen looks flat, corner to corner. No change when you turn your head.
 

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