Curved TV Bigger Viewing Angle! (Can this be true?)

Garrett

Moderator
How do they make this out? Surely quite the opposite.
To draw a comparison say I cut an orange in half and look at the inside straight on then start to turn it gets to 90 degrees before I can't see what I was originally looking at. Yet if I scoop it out and look into it I don't have the turn it very far before the edge starts cutting of the view of the inside.

The only thing I can see is the benefit is if you're sat in the middle the centre of the screen is going to be more at the same distance as the edges. Which reminds me of a painting I once saw that was all the way round the inside of a circular room and gave an impression of 3D.
 
Last edited:

Garrett

Moderator
No thoughts anyone?
 

kbfern

Distinguished Member
If it was curved convex it would give bigger viewing angle but they are concave which would be less I would have thought, maybe they have some special tech but it sounds more like smoke & mirrors to me.:confused:
 

Queens Pawn

Active Member
if you're sitting off centre then your near side picture will be squashed and far side stretched. so overall there ill be less distortion and a better (if not bigger) picture.

so less distortion over a wider range of viewing angles, at the expense of some distortion sitting on centre.
 

raduv1

Distinguished Member
I do not know , but I believe from seeing it that the curve would benefit us as we sit close to the tv ( no more that 6 ft ) and a larger set with the curve could be very immersive for us , looking at 65" but might not be possible space wise so think it's going to be a 55.
 

Garrett

Moderator
if you're sitting off centre then your near side picture will be squashed and far side stretched. so overall there ill be less distortion and a better (if not bigger) picture.

so less distortion over a wider range of viewing angles, at the expense of some distortion sitting on centre.
If sat on the centre line and at the radius of the curve which I would say pretty near you get no distortion, but you don't. And doing a rough drawing with compass and rule the ratio sitting on the centre line at my viewing distance and the ratio between the sides and middle are less on a flat screen than the curved.
These are the the points I got from a 24 point screen radius and converting my 36 inch wide screen(width not diagonal) and 96 inch distance Id watch at from my flat screen.
In the centre figures is first working on the 24 radius and the second if the screen size is the same but the depth reduced by half.
On centre Curved.......Flat

LHS.............88..........88
Centre........93/89.......86
RHS............88 ..........88

Moving 27 degrees off centre to the right

LHS........105..............105
Centre...102/99............97
RHS........90................90

As you can see there more and less distortion on the centreline with the curved screen depending on the depth of curve.
At 27 degrees off centre the curved screen has less distortion from the left side to centre but then the uniformity from the centre to the RHS is a lot greater than the flat which distortion is practically even between LH, Centre and RHS.

Although this may be a bit ad hoc disagree that the viewing angle on a curve screen is better than a flat and quite the opposite, but it gives a better on centre if the curve is not too big.
 
Last edited:

Queens Pawn

Active Member
If sat on the centre line and at the radius of the curve which I would say pretty near you get no distortion, but you don't.

A good analysis (sorry can't quote the rest - haven't got the hang of multiquote!). Always good to have one's view challenged.

Thinking about it another way, the image displayed is captured using a spherical lens of a particular focal point onto a flat sensor / film.

A curved screen takes this flat plane captured image and distorts it so that every point is perpendicular to the viewer in the "sweet spot".

A flat screen reproduces the captured image faithfully.

Following that reasoning, curved screens have more distortion at their sweet spot regardless of the distance to the screen.


The range of angles where the viewer is perpendicular to the screen is greater with a curved screen than a flat screen. In this respect, the curved screen has less distortion than the flat screen BUT it has to distort the image in the first place to get there. So the question is whether this initial distortion is worth it.
 

ArmitageShanks

Well-known Member
I would have thought a curved screen made sense with something like a projector with an anamorphic lens since it would reduce the natural distortion of the projected image (which is why I thought many theatres still had subtly-curved screens?)

Not much point for it in a TV - a flat surface seems more natural and ideal IMO. I suspects marketing malarkey at work!
 

southeastjedi

Active Member
I was pretty sceptical too of the larger viewing angles on curved TV's until I popped into my local Currys and checked out the Samsung UE55HU8500. I'm not a huge fan of Samsung but I was quite surprised when looking at the model from extreme left and right, I didn't see any kind of picture distortion when viewing or colour drop offs. I wouldn't go for a curved screen as I prefer flat but it's something to see for yourself and make your own mind up.
 

ArmitageShanks

Well-known Member
I've taken a look at both Currys and John Lewis at the latest Samsung UHD models over the past few weeks - they certainly look striking, but I wouldn't pay a premium for it. Do they suffer from screen uniformity issues like other LED models (I couldn't really tell with the material they typically show in store)?
 

Roohster

Distinguished Member
Seems like a gimmick to me.
I really don't see the point, a screen would have to be ridiculously huge for it to make any difference.

If it's a necessity for large screens, why aren't all cinema screens curved? :p
 

shoestring25

Distinguished Member
why spend all this time making slim tvs then curve them so now they stick out if you wall mount them?. its stupid just because you can curve a tv doesnt mean you should
 

ArmitageShanks

Well-known Member
I remember a time when we had curved CRTs and looked forward to a future where TVs where flat and thin and could be hung on a wall "like a picture". Now they're trying to convince us that curving the screens inwards is the next big thing? Fast-forward about 5 years and we'll be back to flat again I'm sure.
 

The latest video from AVForums

Podcast: Best Hi-Fi products of 2020, Plus Best of the Month for TV Shows & Movies
Top Bottom