• New Patreon Tier and Early Access Content available. If you would like to support AVForums, we now have a new Patreon Tier which gives you access to selected news, reviews and articles before they are available to the public. Read more.

Credit card fraud

Jenn

Distinguished Member
I just wanted to warn people and tell you to check your credit card statement especially if you are with the Yorkshire Bank.

I don't know if it's specific to this bank but yesterday my father in law got a call from the bank regarding suspicious activity on the account and of course there were dodgy transactions on it. The card got cancelled straight away.

Today we received a call from the bank security team asking us why we have suddenly been spending so much on our card.
Since 27th July about £2500 has been spent at Dabs (which we never ever buy from), some at Family Ancestry and about an hour ago an O2 top up card was bought (we don't have O2 phones) and a donation was made to Muslim Aid :rolleyes:
We very rarely use this card and the bank's system flagged it. It has now been cancelled and we won't be liable for any of these purchases (thank god).

So it might be a good idea to call your credit card company and check how much has been spent on your card this month and check the last few amounts to see if anyone's using your card.
 

HMHB

Distinguished Member
I have online access to my recent statements and transactions and log in most days to keep an eye on things.
 

Jenn

Distinguished Member
Joe90sDad said:
Jenn, this is going on all the time up and down the country.

I've had my cards scammed 3 times going back to the late 90s. :mad:

I know it's going on all the time, but it's a bit of a coincidence that both my father in law and we got a call from the same bank within 2 days regarding fraud on VISA cards when we never had fraud before.

Sounds like Yorkshire Bank has had a security problem.
 

Joe90sDad

Banned
I only keep 3 cards now and eventhough I was offered a much higher credit limit on them I chose to keep a cap up to what I realistically need.
 

t1m103

Active Member
got done the same ,02 top up cards..mbna master card tho.
 

Joe90sDad

Banned
Jenn said:
I know it's going on all the time, but it's a bit of a coincidence that both my father in law and we got a call from the same bank within 2 days regarding fraud on VISA cards when we never had fraud before.

Sounds like Yorkshire Bank has had a security problem.

Could be the postal service or somewhere both you and your father shop.
 

Jenn

Distinguished Member
Joe90sDad said:
Could be the postal service or somewhere both you and your father shop.

Doubt it, we never use the VISA card in shops (we never remember the pin number) and the only thing that comes off it is the Sky and Internet subscription every month.

The only thing in common is the family name on the cards (father in law and husband). We're not even in the same post run.
 

pjclark1

Well-known Member
It's always a shop or online store, as far as I can see.
 

mjn

Distinguished Member
Never had my credit card details stolen in the 11 years i've had a card, and i've made thousands of online or over the phone purchases.

I think a lot of it, comes down to common sense.
 

Joe90sDad

Banned
mjn said:
Never had my credit card details stolen in the 11 years i've had a card, and i've made thousands of online or over the phone purchases.

I think a lot of it, comes down to common sense.

You're more likely to compromise your details in shops, restaurants and hotels etc.
The scaremongering about online credit card use is perpetuated by journalists who don't have a clue.

My last credit card was scammed before I'd even used it. It hadn't even left the house. Common sense certainly wouldn't have made a difference.
 

mjn

Distinguished Member
Joe90sDad said:
You're more likely to compromise your details in shops, restaurants and hotels etc.

That is also simple, never let the credit card out of your sight.

Joe90sDad said:
My last credit card was scammed before I'd even used it. It hadn't even left the house. Common sense certainly wouldn't have made a difference.

I only use credit card companies that send out cards that are not activated, and i have to phone up and activate using a series of questions.

That way, even if somebody intercepts my card before it reaches me, its useless to them.
 

Joe90sDad

Banned
mjn, I did have to activate it once I got it.

There could have only have been two scenarios - my postie removes the card and notes down all the details and sticks it back in to be delivered or someone within the credit card company.
 

partyweb

Distinguished Member
Jenn said:
...some at Family Ancestry...

:D Wouldn't it be great if the CC company was able to trace the perp from this transaction. I wonder if the perp would have been daft enough to be researching their own ancestry. :suicide:
 

Kebabhead

Distinguished Member
Joe90sDad said:
mjn, I did have to activate it once I got it.

There could have only have been two scenarios - my postie removes the card and notes down all the details and sticks it back in to be delivered or someone within the credit card company.

I thought most CC companies now send there cards out by courier to combat theft from the Post Office

All my cards have come via this and I had to sign for them
 

Jenn

Distinguished Member
mjn said:
Never had my credit card details stolen in the 11 years i've had a card, and i've made thousands of online or over the phone purchases.

I think a lot of it, comes down to common sense.

We've had a credit card for that long without a problem.
We've used it online and in shops for many years but in the last two years it has stayed in the wallet and only pays for Sky and the Internet connection at home. The fraudster started using it in the last 2 weeks so it's got nothing to do with common sense and where we use the card. We use our other card almost on a daily basis, buying in shops and online and nothing's happened to it (yet - touch wood).

Credit card fraud can start at different sources:
- Online shop that's not quite secure and gets hacked, card details stolen
- Brick and mortar shop with less than honest employees who clone your card
- Dodgy post office employee stealing your mail
- Bank employee stealing details, or bank network getting hacked
- Bank cashpoint with "spy devices"
- Computer constantly trying random card combinations until one works

Anyway you're protected against fraud and the only hassle is that you have to wait for your new card to arrive.
It's more a pain for the companies who sold the stuff to the fraudster and will never see their money.
 

Jenn

Distinguished Member
partyweb said:
:D Wouldn't it be great if the CC company was able to trace the perp from this transaction. I wonder if the perp would have been daft enough to be researching their own ancestry. :suicide:

We thought about that too :)

The most stupid thief who goes and enters all his family details and pays with a stolen card :rolleyes:
 

Joe90sDad

Banned
Kebabhead said:
I thought most CC companies now send there cards out by courier to combat theft from the Post Office

All my cards have come via this and I had to sign for them

Some do but Capital One certainly didn't. They also keep sending me these poxy cheque books so I can write cheques out of my credit card account.

Even the couriers who deliver them don't bother with a signature many times, they just stick it through the door.
 

Pat_C

Well-known Member
Kebabhead said:
I thought most CC companies now send there cards out by courier to combat theft from the Post Office

All my cards have come via this and I had to sign for them
Is there any reason to believe that couriers employ people who are more honest than Post Office staff?
 

TeeDoubleUDee

Active Member
I don't get this. I've had CCs since they launched (Barclaycard) decades ago. Only fraud I suffered was when some ******* nicked the card out of my wallet at work and I didn't notice till the next day.

If the fraudsters are ordering stuff on-line, normally the supplier will ony post to the card holders adress. If the purchases are being made in-store, how does he know the PIN number?
 

Pat_C

Well-known Member
Joe90sDad said:
Some do but Capital One certainly didn't. They also keep sending me these poxy cheque books so I can write cheques out of my credit card account.
Most people throw those straight in the bin, probably without shredding them. The banks and card companies don't exactly go out of their way to help reduce identity theft.
 

Pat_C

Well-known Member
TeeDoubleUDee said:
If the fraudsters are ordering stuff on-line, normally the supplier will ony post to the card holders adress.
Many will delivery anywhere you like. However I believe they are liable for any losses if they do this - and quite rightly too.
 

Jenn

Distinguished Member
Neil Sumner said:
Surley the O2 topup can be traced to a phone and then that phone barred pending an investigation.

-Neil

We thought that too but would the phone company actually be that suficient?
You'd have thought that the police could also trace the guy quite easily by tracing the phone using the credit but there must be so many of them crooks that they don't even try.
 

Joe90sDad

Banned
Pat_C said:
Most people throw those straight in the bin, probably without shredding them. The banks and card companies don't exactly go out of their way to help reduce identity theft.

On my last fraud the retailers and Capital One didn't care a jot about trying to discover who the fraudsters were, they didn't care to know any of the information I was offering them.

Regards the cheques, I always shred them and pretty much anything with any kind of personal data on it. Capital One are rated as the No.1 junk mailer when it comes to credit cards, I believe.
 

The latest video from AVForums

Fidelity in Motion's David Mackenzie talks about his work on disc encoding & the future of Blu-ray
Subscribe to our YouTube channel

Full fat HDMI teeshirts

Support AVForums with Patreon

Top Bottom