Crappy delivery options on furniture etc

pragmatic

Distinguished Member
Why do most online companies have crappy delivery options, especially when its larger items like furniture.

Often its like within the next 14 days we will deliver between 9am and 6pm.

What's wrong with a named day, weekend or evening delivery option?

John Lewis do slots, with the option of paying extra to refine the slot to a few hours, they even do named day and morning, afternoon or evening delivery as standard.

This seems like a complete oversight on the part of many online companies, acting like the days of catalogue shops and housewives. People don't want to and often can't take a day off with short notice (oh we'll be delivering today/tomorrow) and then expect you to wait in all day.

It's particularly annoying because its simply a logistics issue of picking an appropriate courier, sure use a standard cheapo/bulk one for 'free' delivery, but give a paid option for those that need it. Otherwise you'll lose out on business and people will go elsewhere, even picking a less suitable produce so as not to waste a holiday or unpaid leave.
 

Hitby

Well-known Member
We've been looking for rattan furniture for our garden recently and came across this a lot. A few companies had what we wanted for a decent price but there was no way they could offer Saturday delivery. Weird really in this day and age. It got so bad trying to find somewhere I eventually bought something similar that I wanted but not exactly from Argos and went and picked it up from the shop an hour later!
 

nheather

Distinguished Member
Often it is because furniture is delivered direct from the manufacturer rather than from the retailers warehouse.

So they have less control.

A good example would be Argos.


I guess places like John Lewis have a tighter grip on their suppliers.

Cheers,

Nigel
 

pragmatic

Distinguished Member
Often it is because furniture is delivered direct from the manufacturer rather than from the retailers warehouse.

So they have less control.

A good example would be Argos.


I guess places like John Lewis have a tighter grip on their suppliers.

Cheers,

Nigel

Well I should just buy off them then, no need to give argos a cut.

edit: I wouldn't mind too much if they have to stick it in a warehouse until i was ready to receive it, I can't see what value argos are adding IMO.
 

nheather

Distinguished Member
I can't see what value argos are adding IMO.

A catalogue, shops, online shopping, access to manufacturers that don't sell direct to the public, ability to drive the manufacturer price down on your behalf.

Cheers,

Nigel
 

pragmatic

Distinguished Member
A catalogue, shops, online shopping, access to manufacturers that don't sell direct to the public, ability to drive the manufacturer price down on your behalf.

Cheers,

Nigel

:blush: Yes I suppose so, depends on the size of the furniture company it may not be viable to sell direct.

Hopefully the likes of Amazon, Tesco and Play marketplaces will remove these constraints.
 

nheather

Distinguished Member
Yes I suppose so, depends on the size of the furniture company it may not be viable to sell direct.

I think a lot of the ones that Argos deal with aren't even in the UK.

Can you imagine trying to buy a £49.99 desk, by phoning up some company in Italy and having it personally delivered to you. Can't imagine that they would even speak to you, but even if they did, bet it would be a lot more than £49.99.

I do understand and agree with your frustration though. So many organisations have so little appreciation that their customers go to work.

Cheers,

Nigel
 

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