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Couple of beginner Networking questions

clc.sheff

Distinguished Member
I'm trying to network up my house but have got a bit stuck on a couple of things:

My intended setup is:

Master phone socket > Bt home hub (under stairs ) > networking switch hub thingy under stairs > all rooms in house.

So far I have run two sets of cat5e cable to every location I want networking thinking that I'll have a backbox inset into the wall so that I'll have a flush mounted wallplate with two rj45 sockets in it. ( I just assumed it was as easy to pull two wires through as it was to pull one but I admit it's probably overkill)

A. can anyone see any obvious problems with the above as I have never done anything like this before?

B. I don't know how deep to sink the backboxes into the wall to allow for the internal gubbins of the faceplate?

C. Can anyone confirm if the standard type metal backboxes you would use for say a plug socket are ok?

D. If all the cables radiate out from the switch hub thingy do I need to have any crossover cables? I would like to have one computer set up as a server for music ect. if that's relevant.

E. I think I'll have 7 wallplates radiating out from the switch hub thingy with a total of 14 individual cables, could someone point me in the right direction of what type of switching hub I'll need?

F. I'm assuming the switch hub thingy will need a power supply?

Any help provided would be greatly apreciated as I have a plasterer coming to skim my walls and he's too busy to delay coming and I'm waaaaay behind schedule. :lease:
 

ntm1275

Active Member
A. can anyone see any obvious problems with the above as I have never done anything like this before?:

No, what you've done so far is fine

B. I don't know how deep to sink the backboxes into the wall to allow for the internal gubbins of the faceplate?

C. Can anyone confirm if the standard type metal backboxes you would use for say a plug socket are ok??

The standard metal back boxes should be OK, but make sure you use ones designed for sockets, not light switches (the lights switch boxes are thinner)

D. If all the cables radiate out from the switch hub thingy do I need to have any crossover cables? I would like to have one computer set up as a server for music ect. if that's relevant.

All modern switches are autosensing, so there is no need for crossover cables

E. I think I'll have 7 wallplates radiating out from the switch hub thingy with a total of 14 individual cables, could someone point me in the right direction of what type of switching hub I'll need?

You can use an 16 port switch, 14 ports for your network connections and 1 port to connect to the Home Hub, and 1 spare
To terminate the cables, you could use a 16 port patch panel or 14 separate RJ45 network points

F. I'm assuming the switch hub thingy will need a power supply?

Yes, you will need a power socket for the switch
 

Kristian

Well-known Member
B. I don't know how deep to sink the backboxes into the wall to allow for the internal gubbins of the faceplate?

Some RJ45 modules are deep so a 45mm backbox is usually enough.

C. Can anyone confirm if the standard type metal backboxes you would use for say a plug socket are ok?

Yep, they will be.

E. I think I'll have 7 wallplates radiating out from the switch hub thingy with a total of 14 individual cables, could someone point me in the right direction of what type of switching hub I'll need?

The switch only needs to big enough to connect the actual devices you have, not every run out. A 8 port may be more than enough. A gigabit switch would be worthwhile for a new network.

You could buy a patch panel for the central end or you could use 4x double gang back boxes each with 4 RJ45 modules in each. It may work out cheaper.
 

clc.sheff

Distinguished Member
Thanks for all the advice gents. it's really been a great help :thumbsup:. I've managed to wire my dining room just in time and the plasterer is skimming it as i type this :clap:

I didn't think of using a switch with less ports on it as to be fair it's highly unlikely I'll need even half of the wires I'm putting in. I'll just tag the spare ones so I know where they go and have them waiting in case I need them so again many thanks for the help.

I've got a couple more questions if someone could oblige? :devil:

I haven't done the most important run of wire yet which will be into my living room. I was going to put a double rj45 socket behind my telly etc. and another double in my other alcove just in case the missus does her usual trick of deciding she wants the front room rearranged.

1. Are two outlets enough for av / media type devices? So far I've just got a bt vision box and a ps3 that have ethernet ports.

2. If two sockets are not enough behind my telly am i right in thinking that I can add another switch into my network to increase the number of devices? (I can always feed more wires through from my main swich as an alternative as I have bung loads of cable)

2.a. If I add another switch am I right in thinking there should be a port on the switch especially for connecting to another switch with the crossover done internally so I can keep all cable wired the same?

I read last night on here that cat5e cable can be used for other things like transmitting tv and phone points (I know not to connect phone wires to computer hardware).

3. If I had the whole house wired up would I be able to transmit telly around the house like with a sky multiroom?

3.a. And more importantly does this mean that it's better to use a modular faceplate system and

3.b. would a 45mm backbox still suffice?

Sorry to bang on about this. to be fair as long as the cables and back boxes are in I can worry about sussing out the hardware later so if I'm asking too many questions it's mainly how many sockets to fit behingd the tv? and again how deep? (I'm now assuming 45mm is the way to go)

Thanks for any replies
 

mickevh

Distinguished Member
I'll just tag the spare ones so I know where they go and have them waiting in case I need them so again many thanks for the help.

Good plan. In fact, it's worth labelling everything. (RJ45 modules, often have a little "window" you can stick a label into.) Basically, label both ends of each cable run the same number. If you want to go really OTT, you can write a little note which lists where each cable run goes from & to. (1 == alcove to lounge 2 == alcove to bedroom, etc.)

1. Are two outlets enough for av / media type devices? So far I've just got a bt vision box and a ps3 that have ethernet ports.

Who knows, but...

2. If two sockets are not enough behind my telly am i right in thinking that I can add another switch into my network to increase the number of devices? (I can always feed more wires through from my main swich as an alternative as I have bung loads of cable)

...yes you can (presuming you mean add a switch behind the TV.)

2.a. If I add another switch am I right in thinking there should be a port on the switch especially for connecting to another switch with the crossover done internally so I can keep all cable wired the same?

In olden days, yes, but these days most kit sorts out crossing for you automatically (called Auto MDI/MDI-X.) In any case, it only matters for 10/100mbps ethernet, The most popular form of Gigabit (1000mbps) ethernet doesn't need crossing.

You can convey "other" things over UTP cable. I've zapped analogue phones over it and like you I've read here about using various converters to zap component video & HDMI down it. But as you say, don't mix things on the same cable run!!
 
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Kristian

Well-known Member
Thanks for all the advice gents.

You're welcome.

I didn't think of using a switch with less ports on it as to be fair it's highly unlikely I'll need even half of the wires I'm putting in. I'll just tag the spare ones so I know where they go and have them waiting in case I need them so again many thanks for the help.

As Mick says, label them all anyway.

1. Are two outlets enough for av / media type devices? So far I've just got a bt vision box and a ps3 that have ethernet ports.

That's down to you... What about a Wii, Xbox, net connected TV or amp, HTPC, another laptop?

2. If two sockets are not enough behind my telly am i right in thinking that I can add another switch into my network to increase the number of devices? (I can always feed more wires through from my main swich as an alternative as I have bung loads of cable)

Yes, just add another switch, it should just work when you plug it in with a normal patch cable.

3. If I had the whole house wired up would I be able to transmit telly around the house like with a sky multiroom?

Maybe. You could use a system e.g. HTPC/MEdia PC to store/record music/TV/films and then use network connect PCs and stream the content to wherever. OR you can use the Cat5E cabling, note not a network connected cable, as a medium to transmit a signal but I don't know much about this.

3.b. would a 45mm backbox still suffice?

The deep backbox is necessary to cope with the depth of the RJ45 module that terminates the cat5E cable. Check with the modules you use; you might get away with a less deep backbox
 

clc.sheff

Distinguished Member
Thanks for all the replies again, . I'm now getting quite exited at the prospect of a fully networked house. (although I have no idea how to do all the computer networking etc...... yet!).

Can't wait to switch off the wireless on my router so I can take off my tin foil hat and enjoy some smooooth streaming :thumbsup:.

For anyone else who's searching for some answers here's a little guide I found earlier:

Home Network Wiring - Chapter 2


or for a picture guide of how to attach rj45 plugs to networking cable:edit - see link provided below by mickevh

p.s. Mods. would it be possible to change the title of my thread to something like "Installation of wired network - Beginners questions" to aid with other people's searches?
 
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mickevh

Distinguished Member
Love picture 8 in the linked endgadget page (the close up of the RJ45 plug) - I looked at it and through "they have the plug (and hence the connectors) the wrong way round." :D

Well, OK, it's an old page, they are using the T586A pin out. Everyone uses T586B these days. (Basically the orange & green pairs are swapped around.) As long as it's the same both ends it will work, but I'd stick with received wisdom an wire everything to the newer "B" standard.

In any case, you want to be wiring permanent installations onto sockets not plugs.

This is my favourite how to wire ethernet cables page...

How to wire Ethernet Cables
 

clc.sheff

Distinguished Member
Love picture 8 in the linked endgadget page (the close up of the RJ45 plug) - I looked at it and through "they have the plug (and hence the connectors) the wrong way round." :D

Well, OK, it's an old page, they are using the T586A pin out. Everyone uses T586B these days. (Basically the orange & green pairs are swapped around.) As long as it's the same both ends it will work, but I'd stick with received wisdom an wire everything to the newer "B" standard.

In any case, you want to be wiring permanent installations onto sockets not plugs.

This is my favourite how to wire ethernet cables page...

How to wire Ethernet Cables


Thanks mickevh have edited my post accordingly ;)
 

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