Correct CAT5e/CAT6 for outdoor use?

JollyJamma

Active Member
Hi all

I'm going to run 25m of CAT5e from the downstairs TV room where the fibre connection comes in to the house, up the side of the wall and into my office.

I'm getting packet loss with the wifi and I've always preferred cables over wireless.

I just need to know if I should use one particular type of outdoor CAT 5e/6.

Looking at one of these:
  1. kenable External SHIELDED CAT6A Outdoor Use COPPER Ethernet Cable S...
  2. kenable Premium External CAT6 Outdoor COPPER Ethernet Network Cable...
  3. kenable Premium External CAT5e Outdoor COPPER Ethernet Network Cabl...

Is there anyone here who has had some experience with this? Advice would be greatly appreciated.
 
D

Deleted member 24354

Guest
Hi all

I'm going to run 25m of CAT5e from the downstairs TV room where the fibre connection comes in to the house, up the side of the wall and into my office.

I'm getting packet loss with the wifi and I've always preferred cables over wireless.

I just need to know if I should use one particular type of outdoor CAT 5e/6.

Looking at one of these:
  1. kenable External SHIELDED CAT6A Outdoor Use COPPER Ethernet Cable S...
  2. kenable Premium External CAT6 Outdoor COPPER Ethernet Network Cable...
  3. kenable Premium External CAT5e Outdoor COPPER Ethernet Network Cabl...

Is there anyone here who has had some experience with this? Advice would be greatly appreciated.
Any of those will work fine, BUT I would not use shielded cable. Its too much of a nuisance to terminate properly and you will get little or no benefit from it. Yes I have run a lot of external grade cable.

A tip is not to try and take that cable directly through the wall, use compression glands into Wiska Boxes. Once the cable enters the gland, split away the outer PVC sheath and bring the cable in through the wall, just with the inner flexible sheath. This will help you maintain the correct bend radius for the cable and is much tidier.
 

JollyJamma

Active Member
Any of those will work fine, BUT I would not use shielded cable. Its too much of a nuisance to terminate properly and you will get little or no benefit from it. Yes I have run a lot of external grade cable.

A tip is not to try and take that cable directly through the wall, use compression glands into Wiska Boxes. Once the cable enters the gland, split away the outer PVC sheath and bring the cable in through the wall, just with the inner flexible sheath. This will help you maintain the correct bend radius for the cable and is much tidier.
This is the kind of advice I required. Thank you.
 

JollyJamma

Active Member
Any of those will work fine, BUT I would not use shielded cable. Its too much of a nuisance to terminate properly and you will get little or no benefit from it. Yes I have run a lot of external grade cable.

A tip is not to try and take that cable directly through the wall, use compression glands into Wiska Boxes. Once the cable enters the gland, split away the outer PVC sheath and bring the cable in through the wall, just with the inner flexible sheath. This will help you maintain the correct bend radius for the cable and is much tidier.

Would you mind recommending a compression gland and wiska box for me, please?

Looking at the options is cool but I'm not 100% sure what I'm looking at.
 
D

Deleted member 24354

Guest
Another tip. Do not try and cut the outer sheath. Lightly score it all of the way around with a sharp knife, then bend it on the score line and the outer PVC sheath should split allowing you to just slide it off. Leaving the inner, flexible sheath to work with. Just be aware that you have chosen grease filled cable and that grease will stick to everything, so when you remove the inner sheath, have some rags / tissue available to wipe the cable down.
 

JollyJamma

Active Member
B421FDC9-5A85-4C4E-A784-97BDCC99B9BE.jpeg
 

mickevh

Distinguished Member
Gel filled. I've never done any myself, but a former colleague who was a Telco engineer used hate the grease filled cables.

If you are new to this, I ponder whether it would be worth chopping off a meter of so of cable to have a "play" with cutting, terminating etc. to get used to handing it before committing to the real thing.
 
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JollyJamma

Active Member
Gel filled. I've never done any myself, but a former colleague who was a Telco engineer used hate the grease filled cables.

If you are new to this, I ponder whether it would be worth chopping off a meter of so of cable to have "play" with cutting, terminating etc. to get used to handing it before committing to the real thing.
That’s a pretty good idea.

I went for gel filled because I don’t want water coming down the pipe.

I used to create networking cables before but I imagine wiring grease filled cables is different.
 

mickevh

Distinguished Member
As I say, I've never used such. Guys like @mushii might have some tips, though one that occurs to me is to have some tissues or something handy to wipe off fingers and tools on as you work. Though I may be over thinking this - if the gel is viscous it may not be a big deal. I'll be interested to read of how you get on.

Don't forget to put the boots on before you start dressing off the cable ends onto the plugs and crimp. Of course, I've never be so silly as to make that mistake. :facepalm:
 
D

Deleted member 24354

Guest
@mickevh is right on every point of his posts. Gel / grease filled cables are the devils work. Take plenty of rags / kitchen roll / blue roll and some WD40 to clean your tools with. The grease sticks like s**t to a blanket. Protect easy carpets if you are stripping cable in-doors and wear old clothes.
 

oneman

Well-known Member
Gel filled. I've never done any myself, but a former colleague who was a Telco engineer used hate the grease filled cables.

If you are new to this, I ponder whether it would be worth chopping off a meter of so of cable to have a "play" with cutting, terminating etc. to get used to handing it before committing to the real thing.
I've worked with Gel filled stuff and can get very messy. As mentioned above expect to be constantly cleaning your hands and protects the stuff around you. I didn't find it particularly sticky, more like vaseline.

And 100% agree with practicing until you get it right most the time as every cable and plug and crimper is different. There is nothing worse then finding a crimp didn't work and there isn't much slack left in the cable.
 

JollyJamma

Active Member
my current technique for crimping is using a small Victoria cross knife to score the wires and a 2mm flat head screw driver to push the pins in.

kinda regretting getting the gel filled cable now but hey, I’ll see how I get on.

thanks all for your help
 

noiseboy72

Distinguished Member
my current technique for crimping is using a small Victoria cross knife to score the wires and a 2mm flat head screw driver to push the pins in.

kinda regretting getting the gel filled cable now but hey, I’ll see how I get on.

thanks all for your help
Well, that's different!
I use a good quality ratchet crimper and have never yet had a crimp fail.

I've found the Screwfix basic cat5e plugs comfortably fit most cable types - including Cat6 and provide a robust connection.
 

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