1. Join Now

    AVForums.com uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Cordless Surround Sound

Discussion in 'Headphones, Earphones & Portable Music' started by Optiplex, May 21, 2005.

  1. Optiplex

    Optiplex
    Standard Member

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2004
    Messages:
    55
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Ratings:
    +0
    I'm totally confused regarding surround sound headphones. Do you need a digital feed like a digital optical cable in order for these to work properly or can you plug them into a 3.5 jack or phono sockets. Unfortunately I have an all in one surround system that doesn't have an optical out.

    Also, can you get a half decent pair of cordless ones for around £50.

    Any advice appreciated.
     
  2. NicolasB

    NicolasB
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2002
    Messages:
    5,804
    Products Owned:
    1
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    136
    Location:
    Emily's Shop
    Ratings:
    +520
    There are two completely different approaches to "surround sound headphones".

    The first is something like the Medusa unit, which is a pair of headphones with three separate drivers in each ear-piece instead of one. So a sound that is supposed to be coming from the rear is sent to the drivers just behind your ears and a sound from in front is sent to the drivers in front of your ears, etc.

    A device like that requires a 5.1 analogue signal to work with - you'll need to plug in three separate headphone jacks. So something other than the headphones has to do the decoding of dolby digital or DTS and the conversion to analogue. (This sort of device can be quite cheap - £50 or so - but you won't find a cordless version).

    The other approach is to use a conventional pair of earphones, but with some extra electronic circuitry up-front, so that what the headphones play is (approximately) what the sound would be at your ears if you were sitting in a room and listening to a 5.1 speaker setup. There are a couple of different versions of the processing, but the most common (and perhaps the best) one is called Dolby Headphone. Examples of this type of device are the Pioneer SEDIR800C and Philips SBCHD1500.

    This second type of device can usually accept a digital bitstream signal, such as the digital output from a DVD player, and do its own decoding of dolby digital or DTS before applying Dolby Headphone processing. It may also be able to take an analogue stereo input, convert it to digital, apply Dolby Prologic II to generate 5 channels of surround sound, then feed that through the Dolby Headphone algorithm, although this won't sound as good.

    So you have two possibilities:

    1) If your all-in-one system has 5.1 or 7.1 analogue outputs (that's line-level outputs, not speaker outputs!) you could maybe use the first type of device.

    2) If not, you could take an unprocessed analogue stereo output and feed that into the second type of device.

    No. £200 and upwards.
     
  3. Optiplex

    Optiplex
    Standard Member

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2004
    Messages:
    55
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Ratings:
    +0
    Good info. Thanks very much
     

Share This Page

Loading...