Copying tapes to DVD.

C

combwork

Guest
Hi.

I'm looking for a DVD recorder, either single unit with built in VCR or standalone unit able to record signals from separate VCR, either by SCART or Co-Ax. The idea is to copy my entire collection of old tapes; some home made, some shop bought. Ideally, it would copy NTSC tapes as well as I've a couple of those knocking about somewhere. Ok, extending the boundaries of `no chance' a little further, I'd like to copy some of my old Video 2000 tapes to DVD; I still have a Grundig Video 2000 VCR that worked before I stashed it away. Although it has direct A/V output it's pre-SCART so most practical route out would be by Co-Ax. Go on, make my day. Tell me there's a DVD recorder out there that will do all that........................ Jim.
 

ramjet

Banned
firstly , read this http://www.avforums.com/forums/announcement.php?f=113

and any standard combo has that protection built in preventing original tapes to be copied

home made tapes are normally no problem on any combo

so what would I suggest ?

1) forget about using a combo for starters

2) if you have an old vcr , use that instead with suitable scart to scart lead adapter bought for the job ( cant tell you what it is due to the link I gave you earlier ) but they do exist if you look around for them

3) connect those old vcr or whatever equipment you have to a dvd recorder and copy from one to the other , ie:- tape to disk

any recorder will do , and all have scart and phono inputs so should be no problem with most of them , but the orinals will need that special adapter I told you about ( nuff said ;) )

my sony 410 combo and my sony970b could do what you want , with the input provided with a suitable vcr , I use a sharp vcr for this myself
 
C

combwork

Guest
firstly , read this http://www.avforums.com/forums/announcement.php?f=113

and any standard combo has that protection built in preventing original tapes to be copied

home made tapes are normally no problem on any combo

so what would I suggest ?

1) forget about using a combo for starters

2) if you have an old vcr , use that instead with suitable scart to scart lead adapter bought for the job ( cant tell you what it is due to the link I gave you earlier ) but they do exist if you look around for them

3) connect those old vcr or whatever equipment you have to a dvd recorder and copy from one to the other , ie:- tape to disk

any recorder will do , and all have scart and phono inputs so should be no problem with most of them , but the orinals will need that special adapter I told you about ( nuff said ;) )

my sony 410 combo and my sony970b could do what you want , with the input provided with a suitable vcr , I use a sharp vcr for this myself


Thank you sir; a gentleman and a scholar:D. I'll have a dig round and see what I can come up with. I'm not sure what the legal position is with macrovision now. Back in the day it was a big issue, but with few (if any) major studios puting new releases out on tape, the only people wanting to copy commercial tapes to disc are those who already own the tapes. Oh well; looks like I've managed to trip over a forum rule in my first post:oops:
 

ramjet

Banned
well , a lot of these old films on tapes are being re-released onto dvd so it doesnt really matter what you have , as you dont own the copyright anyway so you have no right to copy those tapes , hence the macrovision ;)

and no you didnt break the rules , I was explaining why we both had to tread carefully due to that rule I mentioned , so I wasnt prepared to name or link to those products that get around it , google is your friend though ;)
 

nvingo

Distinguished Member
Hi.

I'm looking for a DVD recorder, either single unit with built in VCR or standalone unit able to record signals from separate VCR, either by SCART or Co-Ax.
......
I still have a Grundig Video 2000 VCR that worked before I stashed it away. Although it has direct A/V output it's pre-SCART so most practical route out would be by Co-Ax.
Jim.

The direct AV out is no problem, the required lead is a six-pin DIN to scart.
Early "scart adapter kits" used a six-pin DIN to six-pin DIN (correct for recording from one Grundig to another) and added scart-in, scart-out or RCA adapters either end as required. I could possibly dig out the pin assignments to make the required lead if you can't source one.
 
M

mrfreeview

Guest
Hi.

I'm looking for a DVD recorder, either single unit with built in VCR or standalone unit able to record signals from separate VCR, either by SCART or Co-Ax. The idea is to copy my entire collection of old tapes; some home made, some shop bought. Ideally, it would copy NTSC tapes as well as I've a couple of those knocking about somewhere. Ok, extending the boundaries of `no chance' a little further, I'd like to copy some of my old Video 2000 tapes to DVD; I still have a Grundig Video 2000 VCR that worked before I stashed it away. Although it has direct A/V output it's pre-SCART so most practical route out would be by Co-Ax. Go on, make my day. Tell me there's a DVD recorder out there that will do all that........................ Jim.

Can I suggest that you might like to think about a DVD/HDD recorder. Then you can copy your old tapes to the HDD. Then you can edit to make the start and ends ""nice and clean" plus any points on the tapes where the recordings have been stopped and started. i.e removal of adverts! Then you can copy from HDD to DVD.

Ideally to copy from Tapes to DVD/HDD you should make sure that the DVD/HDD machine you copy to has a "time base corrector"

PM me if you want to know about any macrovision issues.
 

NethLyn

Banned
I'm not sure what the legal position is with macrovision now. Back in the day it was a big issue, but with few (if any) major studios puting new releases out on tape, the only people wanting to copy commercial tapes to disc are those who already own the tapes. Oh well; looks like I've managed to trip over a forum rule in my first post:oops:

I respect the rules of this forum but you made a very good point...I own Bond films from the last three decades on tape but across the three generations of Bond vids I own from the mid-80s to 2000, they never copy protected them anyway. Why? Because until last year they were re-issued in different packaging every new film and being collectable, still sell despite being on TV for up to 40 years - they didn't believe it was worth it to put Macrovision on those tapes.

I also have a 2nd set of Die Hards both on tape, 4th and 5th copies of the first two Alien films,the first two on tape, 2 tape copies of T2 because of the special edition, the 1990 and 1994 widescreen Star Wars trilogy...the list goes on.

Chances are if you're a diehard fan of a film in the VHS era, you might have bought more than one copy. So I happily made copies to higher-grade VHS tapes and watched the copies until they fell apart, then made another.

As you can read above, despite backing up what I already owned, I still ended up buying second and third copies of all these films (remasters, extras etc) and then the DVD replacements. So Hollywood's had my money and one day, my VCR's going to die, leaving me with a stack of tapes I can't play.

You have a right to protect your investment in your film collection if you're able to get the right gear. I'll buy a third copy of Star Wars to have it on disc, but if the film was shot in HD, no point buying it until I have the new generation player.
 

mitchelc

Active Member
OP - should make sure the recorder can record (& playback) NTSC material. My Panasonics can but for recording you need to change a setup setting to NTSC or PAL as required. Playback copes without changing the setup setting.

I agree with the suggestion of a hard drive recorder as its very useful for editing & also multi-copies if required. I bought a 2nd hand Panasonic - it only had analogue TV but as I only need it for AV recordings its not a problem & was much cheaper than the current models.

Vertical blanking interval is also a way of identifying the area that can get interference casued by macrovision even just on playback on some older kit & there are solutions for that - again try google.
 
C

combwork

Guest
Thank you everyone, you've given me some very useful information.
 

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