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Copy protected CD's

Discussion in 'Music & Music Streaming Services' started by alexs2, Mar 5, 2003.

  1. alexs2

    alexs2
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    Just wondered what everyone else's opinions on the various copy protection schemes being perpetrated by the music industry on the unsuspecting public are.

    Personally I dont advocate or support copying CDs for gain,but cannot see why I cannot make copies or compilations for my own use,or use a CDROM drive to play my CD's on at full CD resolution.

    It doesnt prevent piracy via low-fi means(analogue to MP3 etc),just intereferes with the much lower numbers of people with decent quality gear....any views please!
     
  2. deckard

    deckard
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    :mad: :mad: :mad:

    That's my view...
     
  3. Gambit

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    I totally agree alexis, but I have a question- you say at full CD resolution. Does a normal CD player not sample at full resolution? This is a genuine question, not a sarcy comment. Do computer based CD player sample at a higher rate than seperate CD-P's?:confused:
     
  4. LV426

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    It inconveniences customers who want to play CDs in their PC.

    And it doesn't stop piracy.

    After all, if I wanted to make an illegal copy of such a CD, I'd just play it in a regular CD player and sample it onto my HDD. OK, its not an exact digital copy, but only those with truly golden ears would know the difference. And OK, it would take longer than true 'ripping'. If I was a pirate for gain, then I'd probably care very little about the standard of my product, and would be quite prepared to invest an hour playing the CD rather than 5 minutes 'ripping' it.

    So, like region coding, its another thing the industry has done without proper thought.
     
  5. JSW

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    Don't know if this has anything at all to do with protection but some cd's I rip to my HTPC I cant get the track names or album name to come up?

    It won't search the DB as says cant read TOC.

    I put all my cd's on my HTPC in ape format and its a pain when you have to enter the track info manually :(
     
  6. nutcase_1uk

    nutcase_1uk
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    My HCPC IS my CD player. I did notice a disk I might have bought the other day if it wasn't a "copy protected" disk. Aerosmith something or other.
     
  7. alexs2

    alexs2
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    With most copy protected CDs,when played on a CDROM,the drive is directed to play low resolution audio back from a separate track on the CD,hence my comment about full resolution.
    The drive itself is perfectly capable of operating at 16bit resolution,but is directed by the copy protection to a low res track....sneaky and unnecessary.
     
  8. Whatts

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    I heard something about a lawsuit against a record company (Sony Music??) that has copy protection on some new CDs.
    Apparently because the discs contain a 'program' and so don't have an audio-only content, they aren't allowed to use the audio compact disc logo...
    Does anyone have more info on this?

    - Tom -
     
  9. Azrikam

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    I've never listened to as much music as I do now that I've got a decent PC. Whenever I get a new CD, it gets ripped onto the hard drive, and I add it to my growing collection of songs. The original CD gets tossed in a drawer somewhere. Infinitely more convenient, IMO. Heck, I don't even own a CD player! (unless you count my DVD player)

    No hassles fumbling and changing CDs, and if I really get funky, I can organize all my music by taste and mood. If I buy a CD, I should be able to do whatever I want with it, for my own personal use. So, if I accidentally buy a CD with copy protection, it'll be going back to the store, cause it's of little use to me.

    I'm also completely guilt-free about downloading MP3s of songs that I own the CDs of, but don't have them with me. (back home in Canada) I've got a move a fair bit, and I'm not about to bundle up my CD collection each time I move. So, it's easier to just burn them in MP3 format onto CD or just download them again whenever I get setup in my new home. A lot of my old CDs are dang near impossible to find now, so I couldn't buy them again if I wanted to.

    Oh, and my CDs also get ripped onto my XBox so I can listen to Sabbath while ripping up the track in MotoGP. :D
     
  10. Sgt.Colon

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    I like to copy CD's so that I can leave the copies in my car.

    Two Christmas my car stereo was pinched and I lost the 6 CD's that were in there. Fortunatly they were copies from the original, so all I had to do was copy them again.

    ANother is the copy protection they bring out, someone will just find a work around like they did with the mark pen episode. I don't know why the record companies waste their time and money trying to find a solution.
     
  11. Whiting

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    There's an article here :

    The Guardian

    The relevant paragraph is :
    -- Barry
     
  12. Azrikam

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    That's the problem with these measures. The legitimate music pirates are always going to find a way around them, so the only people they hurt are the consumers who like to use their purchased media to the utmost. I think it'll do the exact opposite of what it's supposed to achieve, and force more customers away from the music stores.

    Frankly, I think the best thing for music artists as a whole would be if the music industry completely collapsed. At this point, it's a huge garbled mess and only has itself to blame for the loss of sales. They only way I can see it working properly is if it's completely restructured from the ground up. Maybe then artists would actually get paid for their work, CDs that cost a few pence to burn wouldn't cost £15 to buy, and maybe, just maybe, innovative bands would have a chance to succeed over mass-produced corporate pop groups.

    It doesn't exactly promote consumer confidence when legitimately bought CDs don't play in some car stereos, tons of artists are suing their former labels because they didn't pay them (which seems to be standard practice in the industry), and industry bigwigs are being convicted of price fixing.

    I could go on, but it'll only ruin my day. :)
     

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