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Copy NTSC Laser Discs to DVD

Discussion in 'Blu-ray & DVD Players & Recorders' started by MikeNolan, Nov 28, 2004.

  1. MikeNolan

    MikeNolan
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    I want to buy a DVD recorder that will copy some old NTSC laser discs. I have a USA Pioneer NTSC Player, so I will be sending out pure NTSC signals. I do not think the discs are protected by macrovision. I have considered the Panasonic range EMR85 in particular, but my only problem here is that if I get rid of my VHS machines (one downstairs & the other upstairs) whenever I record to DVD disc, I will be limited to DVD RAM for re-use, and unless I get a cheaper DVD player that handles RAM discs for upstairs, if I record to DVD -R, then I'll be binning lots of discs once the programme has been watched.

    In short then, I need a DVD recorder that can record NTSC lasers, and that can record to re-writable discs so that I can play off-air recordings on a DVD player upstairs, and then re-suse the discs. Any ideas folks? Thanks.
     
  2. Rasczak

    Rasczak
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    Panasonic or Pioneer recorders can do this.

    Then the Pioneer 420, 520 or 720 sounds like it might be ideal. These can record to DVD-RW and DVD-R disks. Of course check that your DVD player can play DVD-RW disks by doing a search here.
     
  3. laser

    laser
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    The Pioneer models can handle NTSC so they are your best machine for transferring LD to DVD.

    You should have no problems with macrovision. The LD's I have transfeered have all been fine.

    The only slight irritation is the LD side changes are recorded unless you edit them out.
     
  4. MikeNolan

    MikeNolan
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    Many thanks. The player upstairs is a small portable Bush 2029 which is multi-region and DTS compatible. It doesn't mention DVD-R or -RW. Can't find anything on web.
     
  5. MikeNolan

    MikeNolan
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    Thanks very much. I guess I could always "pause" at changeover.
     
  6. phelings

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    A Pioneer HDD recorder is ideal.You record it all on the HDD then edit the interval out.You would not even have to pause while you turned the LD over(or while it changed sides itself).
    LD never used Macrovision.
    If you have NTSC tapes then you need Pioneer which records the PAL 60 that your vcr will output.Panasonic only records pure NTSC
     
  7. MikeNolan

    MikeNolan
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    Thanks for info. However, I have just read a review of the Pioneer 420, and the comments are that the tuner is not as good as it should be, and that colours tend to bleed simply not as good as a Panasonic EMR85. Of course, if the Bush mini dvd player in the bedroom cannot play re-writeable discs, then I might be forced to buy a cheap Panasonic player and use RAM discs. on both machines. Anyone know if there are any "pannys" for under £100?

    Cheers
     
  8. Rasczak

    Rasczak
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    The Panasonic S27. You may also be able to pickup a S35 or S75 discounted now as well.

    The Pioneer is a good DVD recorder but it is certainly true that it can't match the Panasonic range for overall recorded PQ.
     
  9. GagHalfrunt

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    Would you lose any Dolby Digital by doing this?
     
  10. MikeNolan

    MikeNolan
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    Any ideas where I may find one of these discounted machines?
     
  11. eddyad

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    I have a 420 and haven't seen any colour bleed at all; I use RGB all the time. I would think the colour bleed ws due more to the TV than the recorder.
    The 420 tuner is fine, but it's analog of course and you won't get the same quality as an external digital box feeding RGB. The 420 with a Grundig Freeview box and RGB is excellent.
     
  12. MikeNolan

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    The review for the Pioneer came from WHAT HI FI Sound & Vision. My current set up is a Toshiba 32" widescreen with a Sky+ Box, and a Pioneer 626 DVD Player. The US Pioneer player is a DVD/Laserdisc combi, and everything works fine. I just want to make sure that I won't regret spending the £400 on a recorder, and at the moment, everyone keeps pushing me toward the Panasonic range for sheer quality.
     
  13. laser

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    I though the Panasonic machines do not record NTSC (UK models anyway). If you wanted to record both PAL and NTSC the Pioneer range are the players to go for. I maybe wrong as I don't have a Panasonic DVD recorder but perhaps someone can confirm this before you spend your hard earned cash.
     
  14. Rasczak

    Rasczak
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    The Panasonic models record both NTSC and PAL. They do not record PAL60 which is important if you want to record from a VCR with 'NTSC Playback'. If archiving from a decent Laserdisc player then this should not be an issue as most output NTSC.
     
  15. MikeNolan

    MikeNolan
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    I've just been speaking to someone in a Panasonic shop. However, I did not feel comfortable with what he was telling me about copying the laser discs. He said I could only do it scart to scart. However, the Pioneer Laser player being American does not have scart outputs-only phonos. Will I still be able to copy ow will I need convesrion leads?

    Also, he was trying to explain the benefits of DVD RAM over -RW and +R +RW. Firstly he siad that +R and +RW were not accepted by the DVD Forum because Philips would not have to pay royalties!!?? whereas -R and RAM were, and that in the not too distant future, TV compnaies would block the recoring of films because Philips were not paying these royalties.

    Secondly, he said that as a RAM disc and HD gets full, and parts are subsequenetly erased, all the data is moved to create large blank areas, instead of small blank areas all over the place (a bit like a PC I guess). The reason behind this is that all the small blank spaces would create pauses during playback. Is he right? Do the panasonics grab all the data and tidy it all up. Surely this would take time a bit like a PC defragmenting a hard disc.
     
  16. eddyad

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    Well, he clearly wants to sell a Panasonic - that's what he's there for. Try a Sony Centre and see what they say. I wouldn't mind betting they'll just dish DVD-RAM but hedge their bets on +/- formats.

    The scart-scart isn't true so long as you have lead(s) that will go from your Laserdisc player to the DVD recorder. This could be an s-video + audio leads to scart or you can use separate s-video and plain RCA jack audio leads into the DVD recorder where the appropriate inputs tend to be on the front. OK so long as the recorder has an s-video input option. If your Laserdisc player doen't have s-video but only composite video (the yellow phono) then yu'll have to go to a composite video input on the recorder - usually alongside the four pin s-video.

    The main thing is to ensure your recorder will accept, record and play NTSC. If your Laserdisc is playing OK into your TV then the TV is clearly accepting NTSC. I'd be very surprised if the Laserdisc had PAL60 output capability.

    I don't know about HDDs tidying up. As the HDD is a much more temporary arrangement than a PC disk, then as you watch and erase stuff 'deleted' aeas will tend to join up anyway. A PC disk fragments because it is constantly reading and writng information all over the place.

    The +R/RW vs -R/RW will carry on until one or other 'wins'. Rasczak has views on this.

    The RAM thing seems a red herring. You want to go to DVDs so why would you bother about the way RAM disk space is managed? DVD-RAMs ar more expensive too.

    If recording is blocked, presumably it will be blocked for everything, RAM included. I didn't understand his argument.

    Regarding disk portability, I'm interested in this too.
    I have a Pioneer 420 which will record DVD-RW in video and VR modes. An obvious choice for a compatiblr DVD player seems to be a Pioneer 370, which seems to read anything except DVD-RAM, including NTSC. So you should be able to make NTSC DVDs on a Pioneer recorder and play them on a Pioneer player.

    What isn't clear for the 370 is if it will play NTSC disks into a PAL-only TV
     
  17. Rasczak

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    The + or - issue will not end - it will be ongoing until it becomes irrelevant. High capacity formats - BluRay or HD-DVD - will be added to DVD recorders and as the new media gets cheaper people will stop using DVD-RW/+RW/-RAM in favour of the new formats. DVD-R will almost certainly be the last format standing due to it's high compatibility and high market share. But all DVDR formats will survive for the foreseeable future.
     
  18. eddyad

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    Rasczak - did you see anything is these comments from the Panny sales guy?
     
  19. Rasczak

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    I really don't think anyone here should take too much notice of a salesman - he is obviously trying to sell a product and thus is going to be biased. To briefly look at the comment you highlighted:

    This is entirely correct - DVD+R and DVD+RW are unofficial formats. Philips and a few other companies decided to go it alone on DVDR after they were 'snubbed' on the DVD-ROM specification. They felt they could make more money from their own DVDR format than by following the crowd. The upshot of this is that whilst new DVD players are designed to work with DVD-R and (frequently these days) DVD-RW, there is no such guarantee for DVD+RW/+R. That format relies on being sufficiently close to a generic DVD so as to work on a DVD player - and for the most part that works.

    An issue for DVD 'plus' in the longer term is that Toshiba - one of the largest OEM suppliers for laptops - has decided for 'political' reasons to block DVD+RW playback. They are perfectly entitled to do this whilst retaining the DVD logos as it is DVD+RW is not an official DVD format. This is likely to have larger implications now the Toshiba-Samsung OEM deal has been made.

    He is getting a little mixed up here but there is truth in what he is saying.

    Philips opted not to licence the 'official' DVD recording mode - Video Recording (VR) Mode - using instead the standard DVD-Video specification (also found on DVD-R and DVD-RW Video mode). The problem with not using the 'official' VR mode is that it supports Digital Rights Management (copy once, copy twice etc) - the DVD-Video specification does not. Thus for suitably protected broadcasts only compatible DVD-RAM or DVD-RW VR mode recorders will work (and BluRay which also uses VR mode).

    Now all that said there are currently no such broadcasts in the UK - the first will probably be Sky High Def - however it's just too early to say what the impact will be yet on DVD 'plus' users (or for that matter DVD-R/DVD-RW Video Mode recording). It's unknown if Sky HD will even allow Standard Def recording - and if it does whether it will be compatible with existing DVD-RAM/-RW recorders. In short then this is an 'unknown' issue at present but will be a problem in future.

    Note that some new Japanese machines now offer 'VR Mode' DVD-R recording for this very reason...
     

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