Question Converting VHS to DVD; any experts to help

Discussion in 'Camcorders, Action Cams & Video Making Forum' started by doddawidd, Jun 14, 2015.

  1. doddawidd

    doddawidd
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    Hi there, not sure if I'm in the right section of the forum?

    I purchased the VHS to DVD converter a few weeks ago; USB VHS to DVD Audio Video Converter Capture Card Adapter for Windows XP 7/8 UK from Ebay. It was only £5 so wasn't expecting much. I tried it yesterday and had it connected up to a Panasonic VHS player, via USB to my Windows 7 laptop and while I can get the picture coming through on the laptop, the picture is very badly distorted.

    I went and sourced a second VHS player from a friend and have the same problems. I have tried 5 different VHS tapes and all of them are the same.

    These are home made videos of the children from 30 years ago, so there shouldn't be any macrovision, but it does look very similar to the effect Macrovision looked like, back in the day.

    Anybody got any ideas what it could be? Or recommend a better method of transferring?

    Thank you

    George
     
  2. Terfyn

    Terfyn
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    Panasonic DVD recorder. Mine has FireWire and A/V input as well as SCART from the TV.
     
  3. sep8001

    sep8001
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    I bought something similar and it was rubbish. In the end bought a camcorder with pass through to copy my vhs c tapes to my pc.
     
  4. Terfyn

    Terfyn
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    What was rubbish?
    With your camera pass through you would need to use an IEEE1394 FireWire connector?
    Pinnacle do a device called Dazzle which I believe is quite good. The other preferred device is EZCAP but you need to ensure it is the genuine article as there are some similar devices that do not work.
     
  5. sep8001

    sep8001
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    It was the ez cap device from amazon marketplace and I presume it was a fake ones as it would not work correctly on my PC.
     
  6. 12harry

    12harry
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    FWIW, the best / easiest solution is the beg/borrow a DVD/Recorder and plug-in yr VHS player ( with an adaptor for VHS-C tapes ), using SCART. This will convert the analogue tape format to digital. Ideally use the Recorders HDD so you can edit-out any blanks, etc. and then attempt to Title the sequences so the DVD has something like a Menu.

    If you are borrowing the DVD Recorder, you need to "finalise" the DVD so it can play on another player.

    The DVD should give you over 1hr of reasonably good quality ( but VHS and even S-VHS, is no match for our HD camera stuff.).
    You can EDIT the DVD material in a modern PC (with Video Editor software); adding music, SFX and even adjust audio-volume, etc. before creating a "final DVD" - for the Family Archives. It's probably a GOOD IDEA to include the Original digitised files, so you could have another "go" later. That is, if there is space-room on the DVD.

    There have been may folks who have tried alternative methods - with varying success . . . but this method is certain. I have done it.
    If the VHS tape is playable ( use TV as Monitor) then it should convert to Digital as suggested.

    However, these "Recorders" are getting Old-Tech. so you should convert ASAP.
    Finding a usable VHS player is far easier - but if you can find an SVHS one should be even better - as it will have better internal bandwidth, which may give your conversion the edge . . . . . but don't expect it will look too good . . . Tech has move on from VHS-days and camcorders then were limited by poor Sensors and the Analogue path to tape.

    Good luck.
     
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2015
  7. VHS2DVD

    VHS2DVD
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    I use a Sony DVD recorder VCR of choice? a Samsung SV-5000W a macro vidsoion scart lead [some macro wont copy] I want to try and get through this with help.

    Copying to disc is always 720 x 576 audio 256 kbps is u use a comb recorder non HDMI it flaculates.
     
  8. grahamlthompson

    grahamlthompson
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    Unless the original content was recorded in S-Video using a suitable tape and being copied from a Hi-8 or S-VHS camcorder, using such a machine will be pretty much a waste if time.

    Composite video has two components, luminance and chrominance. A standard vcr combines these into a single signal on copying to tape, a S-VHS recorder records luminance and chrominance separately. During the process of decombining the two signals in the display/recorder a degree of interaction degrades the signal, creating the patterns you see on some material. If you can keep these separate from source to display the picture quality is superior and has an increased capability to reproduce finer detail. Once you have combined them onto a standard tape you have lost the source to display separation. You might get a slightly better result from a S-VHS recorder thanks to it's comb filter.

    In the end the best result would be to use a DV converter with a S-Video input from a S-VHS recorder.

    That way you get a intraframe format .AVI file that is the best possible to source for editing before creating DVD.
     
  9. 12harry

    12harry
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    When buying s/h OP may find an SVHS is available . . . as I did a while ago... that SVHS is recorded differently doesn't matter since the machine knows what material it's dealing with and switches it circuitry to suit, - all I was suggesting is that the better-spec m/c may extract a marginal improvement even when dealing with VHS... that's all.

    However, I'm sure you'll agree with me that OP shouldn't expect too much, as VHS never was all that good, judged by HD we get now - for far less money.
    Yet for "memories" their value is important, and can at least be converted to Digital... then he can/could have ago at "improvements" in a modern Video Editor.
     
  10. grahamlthompson

    grahamlthompson
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    Yes he might find a SVHS VCR. The point is that unless the original recording was made in SVHS or High 8 there would be little or no advantage. Should the original material be in that format then a SVHS/Hi 8 camcorder will generally be needed anyway to play it back. If it plays back on a standard vcr it's not in S-Video format (most standard vcrs will not play it back anyway).

    https://en.wikipedia.org/?title=S-VHS
     
  11. 12harry

    12harry
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    Post 1 OP says he's using a VHS player, so my guess is that's the format of the Original tape. I managed to buy an SVHS mc recently and that is very good with either format. For the money ( originally) it should be very well built. Certainly it offers quite a few editing features not found on ordinary VHS m/c but then it was aimed at the professional user. These days they are practically worthless - unless you know what you want -
    and hence my buying suggestion - that's all... why nit-pick?
     
  12. MarkE19

    MarkE19
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    To be fair to glt the OP did state that he already has a Panasonic VHS player, so I'd guess the point he was trying to make (please correct me if I'm wrong) is that there is little or no advantage to spending more money buying an SVHS player.
    If the OP didn't already have a VCR and could find an SVHS VCR for not too much more money than a VHS one then he may as well buy the SVHS, but as stated this is not the case.

    Mark.
     

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