Convert Stereo Audio to Very convincing DTS endcoding

Discussion in 'Music & Music Streaming Services' started by Dankeech, Aug 25, 2006.

  1. Dankeech

    Dankeech
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    A friend of mine has given me a document describing a straight forward process to master an album to a degree to dts.

    Out of interest I tried it on 'Leftfield - Release The Pressure' and was very impressed with the extra dimension added to the track by converting it to DTS coding and burning it to CD as a DTS CD.

    Here's the procedure for anyone who is interested:




    Stereo to DTS Conversion

    First, you need to Rip your CD tracks from your stereo CD. ( I use Audio CD Ripper Pro )

    The following needs to be done to each ripped wav file

    You need Goldwave to create the different channels. If you don't have it, you can get it. Its free (there is a permanent nag screen but the program is fully-functional). Visit Goldwave.com to get the latest version.

    01. Goto your 1st ripped WAV file and rename it Track01.wav (you can rename it to anything you like)

    02. Open the Track01.wav in Goldwave;

    03. On the Goldwave toolbar, click "Edit", "Channel"; "Left". The left-channel waveform will be highlighted;

    04. Click "File", "Save Selection As..." and name the file "left front". Change the "Save as type" to "Wave" and the File Attributes to "16 bit, mono, signed"; N.B make sure it is the mono option, not the stereo.

    05. On the Goldwave toolbar, click "Edit", "Channel"; "Right". The right-channel waveform will be highlighted;

    06. Click "File", "Save Selection As..." and name the file "right front". Change the "Save as type" to "Wave" and the File Attributes to "16 bit, mono, signed"; N.B make sure it is the mono option, not the stereo

    07. While the right-channel waveform is still highlighted, on the Goldwave toolbar, click on "Effects" and then "Invert";

    08. Click on "Edit", "Channel" and "Both". Click "File", "Save Selection As..." and name the file "right back". Change the "Save as type" to "Wave" and the File Attributes to "16 bit, mono, signed"; N.B make sure it is the mono option, not the stereo

    N.B You've just created a right-channel OOPS file! OOPS stands for Out Of Phase Stereo. It is a simple technique used to process the two channels of modern stereo recordings into a "new", third channel.

    09. Close the file onscreen by clicking "File" and "Close" on the Goldwave toolbar. When prompted to Save file, select no. (This is so you don't overwrite your original Track01.wav file.

    10. Open the original WAV named Track01.wav;

    11. On the Goldwave toolbar, click "Edit", "Channel"; "Left". The left-channel waveform will be highlighted;

    12. On the Goldwave toolbar, click on "Effects" and then "Invert";

    13. Click on "Edit", "Channel" and "Both". Click "File", "Save Selection As..." and name the file "left back". Change the "Save as type" to "Wave" and the File Attributes to "16 bit, mono, signed"; N.B make sure it is the mono option, not the stereo
    This your 2nd OOPS file for your left-back channel.

    That's the hard part over and done with!

    14. Close the file onscreen by clicking "File" and "Close" on the Goldwave toolbar. When prompted to Save file, select no. (This is so you don't overwrite your original Track01.wav file.


    15. Open the original WAV named Track01.wav;

    16. Move your mouse over Goldwave's toolbar icons until you find the "Low/Highpass" option and click it;

    17. In the Filter options, click the radio button which says "Dynamic". The default option is for the filter is "Lowpass" but if this isn't already selected, make sure that it is!;

    18. Change the initial Hz to 80 and the final Hz to 120 (you can just overtype the values). The default "Steepness" is 5, which is fine. Click "OK";

    19. Click "File", "Save Selection As..." and name the file "lfe". Change the "Save as type" to "Wave" and the File Attributes to "16 bit, mono, signed"; N.B make sure it is the mono option, not the stereo
    This will be your subwoofer file

    20. Close the file onscreen by clicking "File" and "Close" on the Goldwave toolbar. When prompted to Save file, select no. (This is so you don't overwrite your original Track01.wav file.


    21. Open the original WAV named Track01.wav;

    22. Move your mouse over Goldwave's toolbar icons until you find the "Maximise" option and click it;

    23. Half the volume of the file by clicking the "New maximum" radio button, adjust the slider to 0.5, or just type the value in and then click "OK";

    24. Move your mouse over Goldwave's toolbar icons until you find the "Parametric EQ" option and click it;

    25. Choose the "Presets" option named "Treble boost" (its towards the bottom of the screen) and click "OK";

    26. Click "File", "Save Selection As..." and name the file "centre". Change the "Save as type" to "Wave" and the File Attributes to "16 bit, mono, signed". N.B make sure it is the mono option, not the stereo

    You now have six (5 + 1) channels from an originally stereo source! Okay, its not perfect but its really, really convincing.

    Just a few notes...

    a) The left and right OOPS files are the only means of creating background "ambience" from a stereo source. They sound odd on their own, but great when mixed together.

    b) The actual DTS protocol specifies that the Subwoofer frequencies should be no higher than 120Hz - I did do some reading on this.

    c) I decreased the volume of the centre file, so that when I raise the treble, it doesn't distort. The treble sounds great raised on the middle channel because this is where vocals and guitars are usually placed. The OOPS files in the left and right background take care of any high frequencies which aren't slap-bang in the middle (such as panned tambourines and cow-bells).

    d) Once you have your 6 files, you do need to mix them to a DTS WAV file using Surcode DTS CD. You can download the software,at SurCode.com
    In Surcode, you just need to set a destination path for your single encoded DTS wav file.
    Enter the 6 separate wav files you created into the appropriate boxes. When done click on the Encode button.
    It may seem a long winded process but I can convert 1 file in about 6-7mins.

    Burn this .WAV file to cd and play in a DVD player



    Be interesting to see what people think. Very clever how this takes the differences between stereo channels and enhances that into the rear channels.

    Dan.
     
  2. systemsdead

    systemsdead
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    sounds interesting i had a go ages ago but got fed up.what was the timeline from start to finish,and are you on a newsgroup server so we can hear your results would like a listen
     
  3. Dankeech

    Dankeech
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    Hi Systemsdead. Glad to hear a reply on this thread thanks.

    Start to finish per track is about 6 or 7 minutes fortunately.

    I really want to try this in 'Spiritualized - Ladies And Gentlemen We Are Floating In Space' album.

    Annoying thing is that I have 2 cases for that album but cannot find any of my discs. Not sure the legality of downloading a copy, despite having paid for 2 copies of the album. Will probably see if it's available and spend the time coverting every track on it.

    Expect an update to this thread and I'll see if can make a clip available in both original form and DTS'd form.

    I should get round to it next weekend. Buit busy this week though.

    Leftfield - Leftism sounded quite good, though didn't extend a huge amount to back channels. The process relies on a track that makes use of stereo quite well.

    Dan.
     
  4. systemsdead

    systemsdead
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    damn another classic album 'Spiritualized - Ladies And Gentlemen We Are Floating In Space' the only ones that seem to be gettting posted at the min is the bloody doobie brothers and moody blues, keep going at it mate and let me know how it goes,i might atempt it 1 day again when ive got some time on my hands.
     
  5. Dankeech

    Dankeech
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    Well, I d'loaded a copy. Suspect my copy is lost somewhere perhaps it was kicking round the car for some time.

    I'll keep it in the original case though. Suspect that should be ok.

    I'll give DTS conversion a go at weekend providing I have time. PC and NTL issue s at the moment might use up my time though:(

    Dan.
     
  6. av-phile

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    I have a directory of about 20 or so DTS wav files simulated from 2-channnel sources using Surcode DTS. I did that late in 2004 with a ceremonious procedure much like what was posted here with a lot of experimentation. It was exciting at the start, and the results were respectable. Only the center and subwoofer chanels can be said to be discrete. The surrounds tended to be mushy and after a while, many of the results sounded no different from stereo sources processed in prologic. I have recently cleaned my disc to get more space and had to remove much of the individual channel wav files I used to feed Surcode. Didn't get to miss them. With all that effort, I really don't think it's worth it. Better if you do amateur home recording with a keyboard, bass and guitar and some effect/rhythm boxes. If you can be a one-man band recording one track after another, surcode DTS can be more satisfying. I've yet to try it, but it shouldn't be difficult to imagine the rhythm drum track and keyboards on the fornt L and R stereo, the bass below 80hz extracted for the subwoofer, your voice or lead guitar at the center, the percussions and the rhythm guitar at the back in stereo. :D
     
  7. arupghoshal

    arupghoshal
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    Hi Dan,

    I followed the instructions to the letter (also sent you a private message)

    The surcode software is not encoding the files. Can you please advice.

    Regards,
    Arup
     

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