Constant Buzz/Hum on Yamaha RX-V483 while using headphones

zana0701

Novice Member
Good afternoon,

I'm trying to listen to some records on my Yamaha RX-V843 with my headphones. I am getting a constant buzz/hum in the headphones the second I plug them into the headphone jack, regardless of input (radio, audio 1, 2, 3, etc.). The buzz/hum fluctuates with volume and occurs whether or not there is any audio coming through the headphones. There is no buzz/hum when I play music on my soundbar or other speakers via the receiver. The headphones do not buzz/hum when they are connected to any other device.

What could be causing the issue? I am using a 1/8-1/4 adapter.
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
Have you tried using a different pair f headphones to rule out the pair you are using or the associated cable as being at fault?

Headphone buzz can be caused by many things. such as electronic interference.

You could try turning off other electrical devices that are in close proximity to your setup in order to try eliminate them as being a cause of electrical interference? TIf you turn everything off and the issue desists then turn the devices back on again one at a time to ascertain which exact device is causing the issue.
 

zana0701

Novice Member
Have you tried using a different pair f headphones to rule out the pair you are using or the associated cable as being at fault?

Headphone buzz can be caused by many things. such as electronic interference.

You could try turning off other electrical devices that are in close proximity to your setup in order to try eliminate them as being a cause of electrical interference? TIf you turn everything off and the issue desists then turn the devices back on again one at a time to ascertain which exact device is causing the issue.
Thanks for your reply. I did some troubleshooting.

I used two different pairs of headphones and both had the static/hum, though one pair had significantly less than the other (first pair I used). I've tried multiple different aux cords as well, with no noticeable differences in reduction of static/hum. I unplugged some devices and found out that my Pyle PP444 preamp that my Audio Technica AT-LP60 turntable was routed through caused a massive amount of static/hum. I unplugged that and routed the turntable directly to my receiver as I realized the turntable has a built-in preamp. This reduced the static/hum by roughly 80% but it did not go away. The volume of a record was also reduced by roughly 80%. I'm starting to think the culprit is something between my turntable and the receiver, but it's troubling that the turntable's preamp is not enough for me to listen to music at normal dB levels.

What would you suggest?
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
I'd suspect a grounding issue, but I'd also expect such an issue to be audible via the speakers and not just the headphones? Maybe its an issue with the shielding onboard the AVR relative the the headphone amplification?
 

zana0701

Novice Member
I'd suspect a grounding issue, but I'd also expect such an issue to be audible via the speakers and not just the headphones? Maybe its an issue with the shielding onboard the AVR relative the the headphone amplification?
Would it be possible that the turntable is just not putting out enough power? The static only comes through at -5.0dB or higher. However, the music is barely audible at anything lower than -5.0db. I have to go above 0.0dB to come close to enjoying it.

I should also add I really don't know sh*t about audio systems other than following instructions and troubleshooting via internet forums.
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
As far as I'm aware, the V483 hasn't an integral phono stage so the very low line level signal associated with turntables isn't being amplified prior to the main amplification. This is why you are having to turn the AV receiver's volume all the way up. You need to use an external turntable pre amp in order to use a turntable with this AV receiver.

The fact that you are having to boost the volume in order to even hear the audio from the turntable will also result in any noise in that signal also being boosted. THis may be what you are now experiencing.

Maybe look at getting a different turntable pre amp.? You need to use one if wanting to connect a turntable to this particular AV receiver.

The cartridge on your turntable outputs a very low phono level signal. A CD player or other line level sources output a much higher signal. A line level signal is about 100 times stronger than a phono level signal. When a phono level output on a turntable is connected to a line level input on a receiver or amp, the result is almost no sound at all, because the input you are using is designed to deal with a signal that is 100 times stonger than that associated with your turntable. If the AVR had an integral phono stage and dedicated phono inputs then the AVR would amplify the signal to make it comparable to conventional sources. As said, your AVR has no integral phono satage so the line level amplification has to be done by an external turntable pre amp.

It should also be stressed that the turntable has a ground connector and if you were not previously using this then it will reult in an audible hum. THis is often refered to as a ground loop. A ground loop is the result of a lack of grounding. More scientifically, it’s the result of the chassis connections not having the same ground potential or voltage. In order to avoid a ground loop hum emanating from your turntable, you need to ground it correctly to your amplifier or the turntable pre amp you are using between the turntable and the amp. Do this while both the turntable and the pre amp are powered down.

A ground loop hum is 120Hz. While there are other causes of hums associated with turntables, a ground loop is the most common.. If the buszzing is akin to a wasp then it is the 120Hz ground loop hum you are hearing. You should connect the turntables ground terminal to the grounding terminal on your turntable pre amp.

As already mentioned, you'd expect to hear such hums via the speakers and not just the headphones though.

You may finf this article of some interest:
 
Last edited:

zana0701

Novice Member
As far as I'm aware, the V483 hasn't an integral phono stage so the very low line level signal associated with turntables isn't being amplified prior to the main amplification. This is why you are having to turn the AV receiver's volume all the way up. You need to use an external turntable pre amp in order to use a turntable with this AV receiver.

The fact that you are having to boost the volume in order to even hear the audio from the turntable will also result in any noise in that signal also being boosted. THis may be what you are now experiencing.

Maybe look at getting a different turntable pre amp.? You need to use one if wanting to connect a turntable to this particular AV receiver.

The cartridge on your turntable outputs a very low phono level signal. A CD player or other line level sources output a much higher signal. A line level signal is about 100 times stronger than a phono level signal. When a phono level output on a turntable is connected to a line level input on a receiver or amp, the result is almost no sound at all, because the input you are using is designed to deal with a signal that is 100 times stonger than that associated with your turntable. If the AVR had an integral phono stage and dedicated phono inputs then the AVR would amplify the signal to make it comparable to conventional sources. As said, your AVR has no integral phono satage so the line level amplification has to be done by an external turntable pre amp.

It should also be stressed that the turntable has a ground connector and if you were not previously using this then it will reult in an audible hum. THis is often refered to as a ground loop. A ground loop is the result of a lack of grounding. More scientifically, it’s the result of the chassis connections not having the same ground potential or voltage. In order to avoid a ground loop hum emanating from your turntable, you need to ground it correctly to your amplifier or the turntable pre amp you are using between the turntable and the amp.
Well it seems we are back to square one, then. Because I had my turntable connected to a preamp (Pyle PP444) when I initially posed the question and once I unplugged the preamp, the buzz/hum went away. But unplugging it also the diminished volume which makes sense based on what you're saying.

The only issue is that my turntable has a built-in preamp and my turntable's model has the ground cable built into the RCA cables. There is no other way to ground it to the preamp.

Would it make sense to say that since my turntable has a built-in preamp that connecting to another preamp would result in some kind of issue leading to the hum? Is a turntable with a built-in preamp not designed to be routed through another preamp? Or would a higher-output cartridge solve the problem of needing an external preamp?
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
There's no need for the external pre amp if the turntable has its own integral phono stage, but many such turntables alsoo include an option to turn that integral stage on or off. Does that turntable have such an option. If so then ensure it is turned on and then see if the level directly to the AVR improves?

The hum may indeed be as a rsult of the 2 phono tages? Why aren't you hearing it via the speakers though and just via your headphones?
 

zana0701

Novice Member
THere's no need for the external pre amp if the turntable has its own integral phono satage, but many such turntables alsoo include an option to turn that integral stage on or off. Does that turntable have such an option. If so then ensure it is turned on and then see if the level directly to the AVR improves?
Yes, there is an option on the back for Line or Phono and it is definitely and always has been on Phono. Turning it on Line results in awful, awful feedback.
 

zana0701

Novice Member
Is the cartridge well seated and the stylus correctly mounted?

No idea if this helps:
Yes, everything is in place. I

I'll say again, it's only as I approach 0.0dB that I get any kind of noise and it is not exactly a hum like you would hear from a ground and it's not feedback either. It's more of an airy noise, like the sound of something being turned up too loud while not playing anything. Except that the music coming through my headphones is not too loud.

I will also add that when I connect my receiver via WiFi to my soundbar, there is no interference or issue whatsoever and that music can be played at normal levels without having to approach 0.0dB.

The issue only arises when I have a pair of headphones plugged in.
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
I can only suggest there to be an issue with the headphone jack or the headphone amp onboard the AV receiver?

If it were a problem with the turntable or frounding then you'd hear it via the speakers and not just the headphones. M
 

The latest video from AVForums

AVForums Movies Podcast: Streaming Theatrical Releases And The Future Of Cinema
Subscribe to our YouTube channel

Full fat HDMI teeshirts

Support AVForums with Patreon

Top Bottom