1. Join Now

    AVForums.com uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Connection Fundamentals

Discussion in 'Cables & Switches' started by Good-Job, Feb 12, 2005.

  1. Good-Job

    Good-Job
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    I'm after some simple answers please.
    I would like to know what certain connections are capable of.
    1) RGB Scart
    2) S-Vid Scart
    3) S-Vid Din
    4) Coax Video (yellow)
    I would like to know which can support Progressive Scan and other capabilities and limitations.
     
  2. LV426

    LV426
    Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2000
    Messages:
    12,812
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    Somewhere in South Yorkshire
    Ratings:
    +5,021
    A SCART connector is just a connector with a lot of pins on it. The signals that are routed through one can always be equally well routed another way. So, for example, SVideo via SCART is of exactly the same "quality" as SVideo via 4-pin DIN.

    A SCART connector, by virtue of its many pins carries several different signals, and in two directions. Typically, Audio L & R in and out; composite video in & out, RGB (one way). RGB use can be exchanged for SVideo by settings in the equipment. So, in other words, using one thick multicore cable with SCARTs at each end, you can carry all the information required to drive a monitor from a source - video and audio.

    If you use discrete sockets and cables (rather than SCART) then you have to cater for both video and audio separately; video signals don't have audio in them.

    In terms of video quality, then Composite (or CVBS) is worst. This is carried by SCART and/or by the yellow video cable.

    Next up is SVideo (however carried). Much, much better than CVBS.

    Next up is RGB - typically only offered on most equipment via SCART (although it doesn't have to be). Marginally better thsan SVideo.

    NONE of the above are used to carry progressive scan signals.

    Then there's component. Always provided via three (often RCA) sockets coloured red green and blue. Note, this is NOT an RGB signal. Fundamentally the quality of component is equal to RGB. However, component connections are used for either interlaced or progressive signals. Component is only of any use if the player supplies it AND the monitor can use it. Progressive scan is likewise only of any use if the player supplies it AND the monitor can use it.
     
  3. Simon James

    Simon James
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    This was useful to me too- thanks.
     

Share This Page

Loading...