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Connecting via component?

Discussion in 'TVs' started by carlstewart, Jul 1, 2005.

  1. carlstewart

    carlstewart
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    What do you mean by this?? Sorry to sound stupid - but looking to get the best pic from my sammy sp50L7, everything I have connected is by scart.

    Any help to explain is appreciated.

    Cheers
     
  2. leeboy2k3

    leeboy2k3
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    Component is a new input on the back of tv's that has pretty much took over from s-video in america, it is comprised of a red green and blue cable pin layout with sound carried by red and white phono to your amp, component is still analog mind so good cables are required for the best results.

    Also component lets you enjoy progressive scan tv line display, which is when each line of odd and even pixels are rendered at the same time every frame, so you enjoy a flicker free image at 480p 720p and 1080i to suit your edtv or hdtv preference hope that helps :smashin:
     
  3. LV426

    LV426
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    TV signals can be either interlaced (where the scanlines are in a sequence like 1 3 5 7 9..........575 2 4 6 8........576 for each frame) or progressive (where the sequence is 1 2 3 4 5 6......576). All standard TV sources (DVD, broadcast, Set Top Box) are interlaced. But the line sequence can be changed by a de-interlacer to the progressive sequence.

    For interlaced normal TV signals - regardless of their source - DVD, Set Top Box etc...... then the picture quality obtainable from component is practically the same as that from RGB.

    A properly configured SCART connection will carry RGB.

    The major advantage of Component (over RGB) for normal TV signals arises with progressive scan. But even then, there's no guarantee that things will improve.

    All flat panel displays (LCD and Plasma)(*) and LCD and DLP projectors are inherently progressive. On receipt of an interlaced TV signal (eg via RGB), they de-interlace it for display.

    DVD players with "progressive scan" provided and enabled also de-interlace. Since, one way or another, the signal is going to be de-interlaced, the question becomes - which device has the better de-interlacer?

    If it's the DVD player, then a component connection and a progressive signal will give better results. If it's the display, then you're better driving it with an interlaced signal and you can do this equally well with component or RGB.

    (*) certain/few Plasma types excluded
     
  4. Nick_UK

    Nick_UK
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    Not so much "flicker free" - the purpose of progressive is to remove the "line tearing" effect caused by movement in the picture which occurs between the scanning of the odd and even lines on an interlaced picture. There is a 1/50 of a second delay between the scanning of the odd and even lines in a picture, and in that 1/50 of a second, the subject of the picture could move, and produce ragged outlines.
     
  5. carlstewart

    carlstewart
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    Thanks for that guys.

    As I am in UK - can I get a component cable for my sky+ box , or will I not see a noticable difference??
     
  6. leeboy2k3

    leeboy2k3
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    If all lcd dlp etc's deinterlace all interlaced inputs, then why is the ps2 of which almost all games do not support progressive scan still displayed interlaced?

    The same can be said of my gamecube which when displayed through rgb scart is definately still interlaced, as I can tell the whole frame is out of focus with texture detail and model aliasing hidden ala crt.

    However when I select progressive via the gamecube's message the image becomes instantly deinterlaced, displaying the gpu obvious low resolution textures, and horrible heavy aliasing this can also be said of the xbox which through pal 480i disguises the same elements.

    If however you are correct then the native deinterlacing of the tv to all interlaced signals.. faroujda I believe? is not up to the job!
     
  7. LV426

    LV426
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    Not a PS2 user so can't comment. I can guess, though.

    DVDs (and other TV sources) are interlaced at source and have to be deinterlaced, either in the player or the display.

    PS2 games may be progressive at source. For transmission via a "normal" signal protocol (like SVideo or RGB) it has to be interlaced. And then de-interlaced again in the display. Hence two conversions, hence two opportunities for degradation. A guess, as I say.
     

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