Connecting a WAP to a virgin media hub.

RHCP

Active Member
Hi can anyone recommend a WAP that I can plug in to my virgin media hub!

I’ve ran an Ethernet cable from my virgin hub to my man cave and put a switch in there.

I want to now plug a WAP in to my switch, so I get good Wi-Fi in my man cave.

1. Which WAP should I get?

2. Do I just plug it in? Or do I need to configure it?

3. Thanks in advance!

Cheers
RHCP
 

mickevh

Distinguished Member
There's no difference between a WAP that you plug into a switch and a VM Hub: The "LAN" ports on your VM Hub are a built in ethernet switch (there's a block diagram of a SOHO router attached to the "Using Two Routers Together" FAQ pinned in this forum.) Most AP's present themselves onto ethernet ports and you can connect that ethernet port to any ethernet capable devices - VMHub, switch, whatever.

Most AP's sold into the SOHO marker will have minimal configuration requirement, but there will be some unless you want to accept the factory defaults. It's rarely much more than setting the SSID name and passphrase (AKA "Wi-Fi key.") A lot of them will automatically obtain an IP address from your router using a mechanism called DHCP, just like every other device on your network. It's by no means required, but better kit might let you adjust things like the IP address (if you want to manually assign it,) radio channels used, which protocols (A/B/G/N/AC/AX) are enabled and perhaps the channel width if you want to get into that. Out the box, most of that will all be enabled and set up to avail the fastest speeds and greatest compatibility.

It's difficult to advise as to "what to get" as there's a huge variety of features with prices to match. A jumping off point might be to assess what your client devices require and then look for something that matches that. For example, usually the latest greatest thing attracts a price premium, so something availing AC or AX protocols might cost more than something "only" A/B/G/N. But if none of your clients are AC/AX capable, (and you don't expect to acquire any any time soon) then there's no point paying the price premium for something you don't need. Hence the suggestion to see what your client mix is. If you don't need all the "bells and whistles," fastest speeds and latest technology, you can pay as little as 20GBP for basic AP.
 

RHCP

Active Member
There's no difference between a WAP that you plug into a switch and a VM Hub: The "LAN" ports on your VM Hub are a built in ethernet switch (there's a block diagram of a SOHO router attached to the "Using Two Routers Together" FAQ pinned in this forum.) Most AP's present themselves onto ethernet ports and you can connect that ethernet port to any ethernet capable devices - VMHub, switch, whatever.

Most AP's sold into the SOHO marker will have minimal configuration requirement, but there will be some unless you want to accept the factory defaults. It's rarely much more than setting the SSID name and passphrase (AKA "Wi-Fi key.") A lot of them will automatically obtain an IP address from your router using a mechanism called DHCP, just like every other device on your network. It's by no means required, but better kit might let you adjust things like the IP address (if you want to manually assign it,) radio channels used, which protocols (A/B/G/N/AC/AX) are enabled and perhaps the channel width if you want to get into that. Out the box, most of that will all be enabled and set up to avail the fastest speeds and greatest compatibility.

It's difficult to advise as to "what to get" as there's a huge variety of features with prices to match. A jumping off point might be to assess what your client devices require and then look for something that matches that. For example, usually the latest greatest thing attracts a price premium, so something availing AC or AX protocols might cost more than something "only" A/B/G/N. But if none of your clients are AC/AX capable, (and you don't expect to acquire any any time soon) then there's no point paying the price premium for something you don't need. Hence the suggestion to see what your client mix is. If you don't need all the "bells and whistles," fastest speeds and latest technology, you can pay as little as 20GBP for basic AP.
Thanks mickevh, would this netgear AP do? My switch is netgear so hoping for good compatibility or doesn’t that matter? Noticed this has ports for lan cables as well, so I didn’t need my switch! Never mind! 😱
 

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RHCP

Active Member
Or would this be ok only £15 😱
 

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oneman

Well-known Member
It might make sense to get something with AC support so you get 2.4GHz and 5Ghz support plus faster speed.
 

oneman

Well-known Member
Something like this has 4 network ports as well (3 useable, 1 for uplink). Has AC1200 support, not the fastest but should be better than the TP-Link device.

Amazon product
 

ChuckMountain

Distinguished Member
Or would this be ok only £15 😱

Do not buy that one, as well as what @oneman has said about getting at least AC, I found that this one and its close sibling didn't work too well with Virgin Media. Besides you will not get anywhere near 300Mbps from this and won't get past 90Mbps (because of the 100Mbps port) even in perfect conditions.

However, for some reason, I couldn't get these ones to operate at more than 15-20Mbps when I used them some time ago. There was no obvious reason why but I could get more from PC to PC over the WiFi but as soon as they went out via the VM SH2 (I think at the time) the speed dropped.
 

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