Question connect a rope light directly to my lighting circuit to be controlled by a regular switch

m11rphy

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Hi All,

I would like to connect a rope light directly to my lighting circuit to be controlled by a regular switch on the wall. Could anyone make any recommendations ? I don't want coloured lights
 
How much do you want to spend and how much effort do you want to go to? How much mess do you want to make?

Do you want it controlled off an existing switch?

Did you have a particular light in mind? Is it mains voltage or does it require a transformer (low voltage)?
 
The plan is to run around the top of the room in the crown moving and have reflect on the ceiling. I plan to add a new light switch to the wall.
 
Ok, I'm not entirely sure what you want to know? How to do it or just recommendations for a specific light?
 
You want a rope light, but switched from a regular light switch? Sure. Pick the light you want, I'd suggest something like an LED strip light kit, most are low voltage anyway. You could use a rope light if you prefer.

You will need to run some mains cables no-matter how you do it. You COULD connect into the light circuit, but I would not advise connecting it directly. Instead install an FCU somewhere, with a 3A fuse, and link the rope light to that. You could even install a regular socket, if the light has a standard plug with a fuse. If using an AC adapter, you'll need an FCU, AND a socket to accept the adaptor. You can simply link the light-switch into the FCU. :smashin:

I should probably add before you start going into this, you can buy RGB strip light kits that use a remote to switch on/off & change colour (you can just have white light if you prefer). This might be an easier option.

1_11.jpg


Lots of these available on eBay. :)
 
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You want a rope light, but switched from a regular light switch? Sure. Pick the light you want, I'd suggest something like an LED strip light kit, most are low voltage anyway. You could use a rope light if you prefer.

You will need to run some mains cables no-matter how you do it. You COULD connect into the light circuit, but I would not advise connecting it directly. Instead install an FCU somewhere, with a 3A fuse, and link the rope light to that. You could even install a regular socket, if the light has a standard plug with a fuse. If using an AC adapter, you'll need an FCU, AND a socket to accept the adaptor. You can simply link the light-switch into the FCU. :smashin:

I should probably add before you start going into this, you can buy RGB strip light kits that use a remote to switch on/off & change colour (you can just have white light if you prefer). This might be an easier option.

1_11.jpg


Lots of these available on eBay. :)

Thanks for the advise dan, can I ask what a FCU is please ? By the way I'm really enjoying your build thread
 
-- As an eBay Associate, AVForums earns from qualifying purchases --
Thanks for the advise dan, can I ask what a FCU is please ?

Sure. An FCU is a Fuse Connection Unit (sometimes called a Fused Spur), with a changeable fuse. You will have seen them near cooker-hoods etc. Since the lighting circuit will probably be a 5A fuse or 6A breaker, you will need the FCU to make it safer. You can also connect to the socket circuit the same way.

fused%20spur221.jpg


Now I normally support anyone willing to have a go and learn, but if you're not sure I'd recommend getting an electrician to do this part. Or install it yourself, but get someone with electrical knowledge to look it-over before connecting it up. :smashin:

By the way I'm really enjoying your build thread

Thanks :thumbsup:
 
Sure. An FCU is a Fuse Connection Unit (sometimes called a Fused Spur), with a changeable fuse. You will have seen them near cooker-hoods etc. Since the lighting circuit will probably be a 5A fuse or 6A breaker, you will need the FCU to make it safer. You can also connect to the socket circuit the same way.

fused%20spur221.jpg


Now I normally support anyone willing to have a go and learn, but if you're not sure I'd recommend getting an electrician to do this part. Or install it yourself, but get someone with electrical knowledge to look it-over before connecting it up. :smashin:



Thanks :thumbsup:

Thanks so can you give me an idea of the wiring for this ? I was planning to ride it in to a current light in the room i know longer wanted to use
 
can you give me an idea of the wiring for this ? I was planning to ride it in to a current light in the room i know longer wanted to use

If you mean you want to connect it into an existing ceiling-rose without running new wiring, I don't advise it. You could certainly link a new circuit into the loop of an older ceiling-rose.

If you're sacrificing an existing light all-together, you could link the power from the switched terminals in the ceiling-rose, but not via the pendant cable since that's not an appropriate cable. You would still need to install a new cable into an FCU somewhere, then into a new socket (if required). This would be a little easier since you already have the switch wiring in-place.

This is how you could link the light into an existing ceiling-rose:

likethis_zpsrl7ztyh2.jpg~original


This is unconventional, but it is safe. :cool:
Remember to swap the standard 13A fuse for a 3A, otherwise this is all for naught.

I still advise getting an electrician, so you know it's all kosher! :smashin:
 
If you mean you want to connect it into an existing ceiling-rose without running new wiring, I don't advise it. You could certainly link a new circuit into the loop of an older ceiling-rose.

If you're sacrificing an existing light all-together, you could link the power from the switched terminals in the ceiling-rose, but not via the pendant cable since that's not an appropriate cable. You would still need to install a new cable into an FCU somewhere, then into a new socket (if required). This would be a little easier since you already have the switch wiring in-place.

This is how you could link the light into an existing ceiling-rose:

likethis_zpsrl7ztyh2.jpg~original


This is unconventional, but it is safe. :cool:
Remember to swap the standard 13A fuse for a 3A, otherwise this is all for naught.

I still advise getting an electrician, so you know it's all kosher! :smashin:

That's perfect thanks Dan
 

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