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Confused about modes my TV can display (JVC HV-32P37 CRT)

Discussion in 'Televisions' started by Facct, Jul 14, 2005.

  1. Facct

    Facct
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    My Tv (JVC HV-32P37 CRT) is arriving tomorrow, and as I have no way to connect it to my PC through component right now, I can't do any tests etc.

    The PDF specs say through component it can display these modes:625p, 525p, 1125i - which I'm assuming means 576p, 480p, 1080i.

    A post on this forum has said that the TV doesn't support 720p (and I'm sure they would have put that in the specs if it could), so i'm wondering why it can't?

    And also, what about other modes, what determines what resolution I can set? I know it's not like a PC where you can't just set any resolution within a certain limit (limited by horizontal/vertical frequencies?), but I don't understand what determines whether you can/can't set certain resolutions on a TV.

    Another post (a few, actually) said though, that the TV does support 768p. So I'm also wondering, why can it display 768p but not 720p, and what is the highest resolution this display will support, there's no info in the spec sheet. Also, concerning 768p, I'm unclear as to whether people mean 1366x768p which would be 16:9 (but how can it be displayed, 3 pixels either side?), or XVGA 1024x768 - if so, how/why would this work on a 16:9 TV - surely the image would be stretched and look ****?

    Another poster, indicated that he could get these modes 1776x1000 or 1920x1080 (http://www.avforums.com/forums/showpost.php?p=913896&postcount=247). Now my common sense tells me that this TV can't do 1920x1080, although the blurb on the Eisa Awards (http://www.eisa-awards.org/history/2004-2005/video.html) suggests otherwise: The JVC HV-36P38 is the first consumer TV that is able to display high definition video signals with a full resolution of 1920x1080 pixels through a dedicated Component input - five times the density of standard TV and DVD Video images. Now, am I wrong in thinking that only a resolution of 960x540 is needed for 1080i, or is 1920x1080 resolution actually needed for 1080i, which the TV supports, but 1080p requires something else which is why the set won't support it?

    Basically my intentions are, to hook the PC up to a GFX card which will output a native component signal through the TV-out (nvidia 6 series), and to set the TV to as high a resolution as possible, and upscale my DVD's/Divx files (am I wrong to be under the impression this will give the optimal image quality?).

    So any help would be appreciated about what the best quality this TV can achieve is. :lease:

    To be honest I'm starting to doubt whether it's as good as I first thought it was when I bought it.
     
  2. probedb

    probedb
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    I have a 28D40 (for sale) which is a later model and as far as I'm aware it can display: 480i/p, 576 i/p and 1080i. Not sure on the refresh rate for 1080i though I'm sure my computer runs it at 60hz.

    I have my Radeon 9800 Pro outputting 1080i over component. The screen res is actually 1776x1000i to get rid of overscan. I must say even upscaled freeview recordings look far better with a resize to 1920x1080 and ffdshow processing than they do on the tuner in the TV!
     
  3. Welwynnick

    Welwynnick
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    Yes, it is a good as you thought, if you can get a PC or scaler or de-interlacer or hi-def source to feed it. I'm sure the only PAL formats it supports are 576i/p and 1080i. These keep the crucial horizontal scanning frequency down to a moderate 15 to 33 kHz. 720p or 768p, being progressive, would have a rather higher scanning rate, which is probably too expensive.

    PC monitors manage it, but they are rather smaller. TVs normally work on only one video format and don't have to have multi-scan capability like PC monitors, which have to be much more flexible, higher performance, and more expensive.

    The maximum resolution is actually 1920 x 1080, which is partly a product of the screen, and partly the higher-performance electronics to drive it. It is only interlaced, though. 1080 progressive is a bit much for pretty much ANYTHING at the moment, but it won't be far away.

    Be interesting to know if anyone has connected a D-theater player up to one of these TVs.

    Nick
     

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