Concrete floor & ceiling = horrible acoustics

Discussion in 'Home Cinema Buying & Building' started by helvetica, Jul 15, 2015.

  1. helvetica

    helvetica
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    Hi folks. Building a house and the home cinema is in the basement - it's a great space, 10x6 meters, but with polished concrete floors and plaster over hollowcore ceiling the sound is very echoey. Is there a cheap / DIY solution that really works? I read about putting insulation board in a picture frame and hanging a few on the walls, along with plenty of soft furnishings. Or would I be better covering the ceiling in egg cartons, or convincing the missus to cover the floor with a giant rug?? I would appreciate hearing your experience in this area.
     
  2. Rob Sinden

    Rob Sinden
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    A thick carpet is probably the best solution. Otherwise there are lots of specialist ceilings that will reduce reverb time.
     
  3. Trollslayer

    Trollslayer
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    A carpet with good underlay - Cloud Nine underlay is popular.
     
  4. m4ccam

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    I've got the same problem with echo. We had a saxony carpet fitted with nearly an inch thick pile and 12 mm underlay and it hasn't done anything to help with the echo.
     
  5. helvetica

    helvetica
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    And I don't want to cover up the expensive concrete floor! I'm going to try lots of furniture. Might be interesting to record some sample sounds before and after to post here. A hand clap seems to be a decent basic test. Pity the iPhone microphone is a bit rubbish.
     
  6. sheggs

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    Flutter echo is caused by hard paarallel surfaces opposite each other. So firstly you have identify the different places it is coming from. This could be the walls, the floor and ceiling, all of them. So putting in a carpet may only kill the echo created between the floor and ceiling but still leave you with problems with the walls.Don't use anything like egg cartons that are not designed for this use, as they will be practically useless. If you have good DIY skills make your own acoustic panels. Lots ofg how to guides on the internet
     
  7. Ellisdj

    Ellisdj
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    Carpet didnt help me either - neither did a Huge material L Shaped sofa and foot stool/poof and other furniture. We had 2 ceiling lights that would ring as well with a hand clap - thats how it appeared at the time. Terrible echo in the room - room not huge either approx 17feet x 12feet x 8 feet
     
  8. jk330ci

    jk330ci
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    Did anyone resolve the echo in their rooms?
    When I cough or as mentioned above clap I can hear the reverb. My room is a lounge so could only get away with acoustic panels if they were family photos etc
    I have thick carpets and curtains on two walls.
     
  9. helvetica

    helvetica
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    It's a little better since we added more furniture, but way off ideal. Very tinny and bassey, no detail in the midrange. Netflix is different to sky is different to dvd etc. Best you can do is fill up the room over time and play with your setting, then forget about it and move on! It doesn't stop complete immersion in a great show, but you notice it more watching a poor movie i find
     
  10. Spraggle

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    Agreed: The more things in the room along the walls (ceiling and floor count), the less echoey you'll find it. Your concrete floor is lovely, but is a totally flat surface, and thus ripe for echo.
    You can scientifically work out at what reflection points to put things on these flat surfaces, but it's only useful information if you can put things in those locations! :)
    PS, totally got what you meant when you said about poor movies being more noticeably echoey, but it did make me think that all crap films have terrible soundtracks; like they all go to the same terrible mixing engineer :)
     

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