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composite video inputs

Discussion in 'Digital TV & Video Players & Recorders' started by Neil Goodwill, Jun 3, 2005.

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  1. Neil Goodwill

    Neil Goodwill
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    I am a videographer, and investigating a way to record MPEG 2 from a camera covering long events that will go, after editing, to DVD.
    Some of the specs for freeview DVRs describe them as having composite video inputs, but others suggest there are only comp, RGB and svideo outputs. Needless to say I am confused, and would love to have any help you could offer me to suit my situation.
     
  2. MarkE19

    MarkE19
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    AFAIK none of the Freeview PVR's have any external source inputs. I think they will only record the digital stream received over the air.
    I would think that your best bet for recording long events would be to stream directly from a camcorder via firewire to a PC. DV footage from a camcorder recorded onto a HDD in a PC will take approx 14Gb per hour, so a 300Gb drive that is readilly available these days would hold something like (slight delay as I remove shoes & socks to do the adding up :rotfl: ) 20+ hours which I imagine should be plenty. The advantage of this is that the files are not highly compressed as MPEG-2 files would be and are therefore easier to edit accurately and with no loss of quality. Very basic editng packages such as the Free Movie Maker 2 that is part of the Windows XP SP2 install will give excellent quality results from the AVI/DV files you have captured.

    HTH,
    Mark.
     
  3. Neil Goodwill

    Neil Goodwill
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    Thanks for your reply, and useful info.
    DV capture is what I normally do, and is ideal for my normal line of work which is wedding videography, but recently I completed 13 DVDs of a 3 day cheerleading competition with over 60 hours of footage. I used Premiere 6 to capture and edit, but ironically had to capture again to MPEG 2 with a Hauppauge PVR250 on a different pc. I was thinking that if the target was dvd it would be easier to capture straight to MPEG, edit in Ulead Mediastudio Pro 7, then author in TMPEGenc DVD Author.
    I have read that the Humax PVR8000T has an svideo and a comp input on the second scart socket, but whether this translates to the onboard software I have no idea. I also have just realised that I would need a machine with a USB port to transfer the MPEG files to a pc.
    Any further help would be greatly appreciated. :thumbsup:
     
  4. Neil Goodwill

    Neil Goodwill
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    I have just discovered the ultimate dream machine! It's the Humax DRT800 see:-
    http://www.tivo.com/2.1.2.asp
    It even has firewire inputs. Expensive though. :)
     

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